119 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Risk of punishment influences discrete and coordinated encoding of reward-guided actions by prefrontal cortex and VTA neurons

    Junchol Park, Bita Moghaddam
    Risk of punishment during reward seeking behavior is associated with a functional "disconnection" of the PFC-VTA circuit due to a transient loss of VTA-driven theta oscillation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Serotonergic neurons signal reward and punishment on multiple timescales

    Jeremiah Y Cohen et al.
    Serotonin-releasing neurons show tonic firing-rate changes correlating with global reward value in addition to phasic firing-rate changes correlating with local task events.
    1. Neuroscience

    Punishment insensitivity emerges from impaired contingency detection, not aversion insensitivity or reward dominance

    Philip Jean-Richard-dit-Bressel et al.
    Behavioral analyses show that individuals insensitive to punishment are afraid of aversive events, they are simply unable to change their behaviour to avoid them.
    1. Neuroscience

    Punishment insensitivity in humans is due to failures in instrumental contingency learning

    Philip Jean-Richard-dit-Bressel et al.
    Punishment insensitive individuals are not more impulsive or anxious, they dislike aversive outcomes and predictors of these outcomes, but are simply less likely to learn their control over them.
    1. Neuroscience

    Amygdala neural activity reflects spatial attention towards stimuli promising reward or threatening punishment

    Christopher J Peck, C Daniel Salzman
    Primate amygdala neurons provide a coordinated representation of space and motivational significance whereby amygdala responses to visual stimuli predicting either rewards or aversive stimuli could influence spatial attention in a similar manner.
    1. Neuroscience

    Catecholaminergic challenge uncovers distinct Pavlovian and instrumental mechanisms of motivated (in)action

    Jennifer C Swart et al.
    Motivational coupling of action to reward and inhibition to punishment is subserved by dissociable learning and choice processes, and is modulated by dopamine/noradrenaline transporter blockade.
    1. Neuroscience

    Learning the specific quality of taste reinforcement in larval Drosophila

    Michael Schleyer et al.
    The finding that fly maggots, equipped with only 10,000 neurons, process reinforcement not only by value but also by specific quality reveals a basic operating principle of brains and challenges current models of memory organization.
    1. Neuroscience

    Midbrain dopamine neurons signal aversion in a reward-context-dependent manner

    Hideyuki Matsumoto et al.
    Dopamine neurons signal value prediction errors (VPEs) integrating information about both reward and aversion, in low reward contexts, whereas VPEs in some dopamine neurons are distorted in high reward contexts.
    1. Neuroscience

    Affective bias as a rational response to the statistics of rewards and punishments

    Erdem Pulcu, Michael Browning
    Humans adjust the degree to which they learn from positive relative to negative outcomes as a function of how informative they estimate those outcomes to be.
    1. Neuroscience
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    A specific role for serotonin in overcoming effort cost

    Florent Meyniel et al.
    A selective reuptake inhibitor shows a beneficial effect in healthy humans during an effort-benefit tradeoff task, mediated at the computational level by a specific alleviation of effort cost.

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