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    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Adaptive Evolution: At the mercy of viruses

    Claus O Wilke, Sara L Sawyer
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    1. Neuroscience

    Neural Wiring: The circuitry of sex

    Joel Levine
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    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Meta-Research: Centralized scientific communities are less likely to generate replicable results

    Valentin Danchev et al.
    Analysis of data on drug-gene interactions suggests that decentralized collaboration will increase the robustness of scientific findings in biomedical research.
  1. Scientist and Parent: Part of the research family

    Emma Pewsey
    eLife is publishing a collection of articles and interviews with scientists who are parents to explore how to get the best of both worlds.
  2. Research: Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature

    Daniel S Himmelstein et al.
    The availability of almost all articles from toll access journals in the Sci-Hub repository will disrupt scholarly publishing towards more open models.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Science Forum: Unit of analysis issues in laboratory-based research

    Nick R Parsons et al.
    A simulation study is used to demonstrate how mistakes in identifying the experimental unit and the unit of analysis can lead to incorrect analyses and inappropriate inferences when reporting research studies.
  3. Point of View: The sustainable professor

    Elizabeth S Haswell
    Responsible agricultural practices provide a useful lens through which to consider the lives and careers of researchers.
    1. Cancer Biology

    Oncogene Regulation: Enhancers not required

    Ying Zheng, David Levens
    Laboratory mice with over half a megabase of DNA upstream of their Myc gene removed still thrive in the absence of stress.
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  4. Research: Financial costs and personal consequences of research misconduct resulting in retracted publications

    Andrew M Stern et al.
    In the first study attempting to formally quantify the deleterious impact of research misconduct on funding sources and publication output, we found that misconduct accounts for a small but substantial portion of American biomedical science funding dollars and damages the productivity and rate of funding acquisition of those who commit misconduct.