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    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Potential herd protection against Plasmodium falciparum infections conferred by mass antimalarial drug administrations

    Daniel M Parker et al.
    Given sufficient population adherence, mass drug administration for falciparum malaria can provide group level benefits, also known as ‘herd effects’.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Ecology
    Chlamydomonas illustration

    The Natural History of Model Organisms: From molecular manipulation of domesticated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to survival in nature

    Severin Sasso et al.
    Dubbed the 'green yeast', the model alga C. reinhardtii has profoundly advanced many areas of biology, but much remains to be learnt about its life in the wild.
    1. Neuroscience

    Arid1b haploinsufficient mice reveal neuropsychiatric phenotypes and reversible causes of growth impairment

    Cemre Celen et al.
    Mirroring human patients with ARID1B mutations, Arid1b haploinsufficient mice exhibited numerous neuropsychiatric defects and revealed IGF1 deficiency related growth impairment that could be ameliorated with growth hormone supplementation.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    The malaria parasite sheddase SUB2 governs host red blood cell membrane sealing at invasion

    Christine R Collins et al.
    Genetic analysis identifies an enzyme of the malaria parasite that is required to seal its host red blood cell membrane upon invasion, a key requirement of this important intracellular pathogen.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Evolutionarily distant I domains can functionally replace the essential ligand-binding domain of Plasmodium TRAP

    Dennis Klug et al.
    Exchange of the I domain in the Plasmodium surface protein TRAP against evolutionary distant I domains rescues infectivity of sporozoites.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    A comparative transcriptomic analysis of replicating and dormant liver stages of the relapsing malaria parasite Plasmodium cynomolgi

    Annemarie Voorberg-van der Wel et al.
    This comprehensive transcriptomic resource of dormant and replicating malaria liver parasites highlights the dearth of pathways that operate in the hypnozoites and the need to investigate druggability (i.e. selectivity and safety) of core pathways in malaria parasites.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Structure of the malaria vaccine candidate antigen CyRPA and its complex with a parasite invasion inhibitory antibody

    Paola Favuzza et al.
    The structure of the promising malaria blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen PfCyRPA and the characterization of a protective epitope are facilitating research on its essential role in parasite invasion, and will guide future epitope-focused vaccine design.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Blood-stage immunity to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria following chemoprophylaxis and sporozoite immunization

    Wiebke Nahrendorf et al.
    A novel mouse model of immunization against Plasmodium chabaudi involving infectious mosquito bites and drug-treatment elicits protection against blood-stage malaria parasites, and shows that protection is not necessarily life cycle stage-specific.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    The complex relationship of exposure to new Plasmodium infections and incidence of clinical malaria in Papua New Guinea

    Natalie E Hofmann et al.
    Under sustained malaria control in PNG, the incidence of distinct blood-stage infections quantifies heterogeneity in transmission, significantly predicting risk of both P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria episodes at a population and individual scale.
    1. Ecology
    2. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Tracking zoonotic pathogens using blood-sucking flies as 'flying syringes'

    Paul-Yannick Bitome-Essono et al.
    A field study coupled with a molecular analysis demonstrates that using hematophagous flies as 'flying syringes' could be used to investigate blood-borne pathogen diversity in wild vertebrates and act as an early detection tool of zoonotic pathogens.