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  1. The cone snail Conus geographicus eating a goby fish

    Episode 55: March 2019

    In this episode, we hear about fast-acting insulin in cone snails, the roots of addiction, new gene editing techniques and gender biases in joint first authors.
  2. March 2016

    Episode 28: March 2016

    In this episode we hear about aging, artificial fingertips, ancient DNA, antibiotic resistance and dengue fever.
  3. December 2014

    Episode 16: December 2014

    In this episode we hear about reproducibility, drug resistance, cells without walls, gene transfer, interspecies signalling, and stem cells.
  4. February 2015

    Episode 18: February 2015

    In this episode we hear about TB, HIV, social behaviour in ants, genetics in baboons and a surprising twist to the handshake.
  5. Episode 50: October 2018

    In this special episode, we discuss how tiny microbes in the gut – the microbiome – can have a huge impact on the lives of animals.
  6. August 2016

    Episode 31: August 2016

    In this episode we hear about human height, fish joints, colour vision, chimpanzees using tools and open science.
  7. Episode 3: August 2013

    Episode 3: August 2013

    In this episode we hear about the cocktail party effect, the role of psuedogene RNA in the immune response, the genetic origins of a common form of blindness, the flu vaccine, and the origins of schistosomiasis.
  8. April 2014

    Episode 11: April 2014

    In this episode we hear about neuropathic pain, gene therapy, insulin production, aging in worms, and how flatworms grow new body parts.
  9. A syringe injecting a clear liquid into the Earth

    Episode 56: April 2019

    In this episode, we hear about multipartite viruses, brain maps of people without hands, measles vaccinations, reproducible science, and how to spot premature babies.
  10. Parents and children work together to build a tower of blocks that feature images representing work and family activities that a scientist may take part in

    Scientist and Parent

    Edited by Emma Pewsey et al.
    A research career and family life are not incompatible.