168 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    Matthew S Kayser et al.
    A single night of sleep deprivation suppresses fighting behaviors in male fruit flies, with consequent impairments in reproductive fitness.
    1. Neuroscience

    Sleep deprivation causes memory deficits by negatively impacting neuronal connectivity in hippocampal area CA1

    Robbert Havekes et al.
    The loss of neuronal connectivity in a brain region called the hippocampus significantly contributes to the cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation.
    1. Neuroscience

    Olfactory connectivity mediates sleep-dependent food choices in humans

    Surabhi Bhutani et al.
    Sleep deprivation enhances energy-dense food choices and encoding of olfactory information in the human brain.
    1. Neuroscience

    Cerebral mGluR5 availability contributes to elevated sleep need and behavioral adjustment after sleep deprivation

    Sebastian C Holst et al.
    Multi-modal imaging, genetic and behavioral findings in humans and mice revealed that metabotropic glutamate receptors of subtype 5 contribute to the molecular machinery keeping track of sleep need and coping with physiological and behavioral consequences of sleep loss, pointing to novel targets for improved wakefulness and sleep.
    1. Neuroscience

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) adjusts clock-gene expression and REM-sleep recovery following sleep deprivation

    Marieke MB Hoekstra et al.
    The temperature-sensitive protein CIRBP contributes to the effect of sleep loss on the molecular circadian clock.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Sleep: To rebound or not to rebound

    Bethany A Stahl, Alex C Keene
    Sexual arousal in flies counteracts the effects of sleep deprivation.
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    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    Regulation of sleep homeostasis by sexual arousal

    Esteban J Beckwith et al.
    Sexual arousal, exposure to aphrodisiac pheromones, or mere activation of peripheral pheromone-sensing neurons can modulate sleep homeostasis and are able to counteract the effects of sleep deprivation in Drosophila.
    1. Neuroscience

    Identification of Redeye, a new sleep-regulating protein whose expression is modulated by sleep amount

    Mi Shi et al.
    A gene found in Drosophila, and named redeye, encodes a protein that accumulates during sleep deprivation and forms part of the homeostatic system that promotes and maintains sleep.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Autoresuscitation: The central role of serotonin

    Gary C Mouradian, Matthew R Hodges
    The neurotransmitter serotonin helps to co-ordinate the respiratory and cardiovascular responses of newborns to oxygen deprivation.
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    1. Neuroscience

    Sleep: Up all night on a redeye flight

    Leslie C Griffith
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