Browse the search results

Page 2 of 167
  1. Philosophy of Biology: Health, ecology and the microbiome

    S Andrew Inkpen
    The interactions between communities of microbial species and their human hosts raise questions about the nature of health and disease.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Meta-Research: Incidences of problematic cell lines are lower in papers that use RRIDs to identify cell lines

    Zeljana Babic et al.
    The use of Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) improves the proper use of cell lines in the biomedical literature.
  2. Meta-Research: How significant are the public dimensions of faculty work in review, promotion and tenure documents?

    Juan P Alperin et al.
    An analysis of review, promotion and tenure documents from 129 US and Canadian universities suggests institutions could better fulfill their public missions by changing how they incentivize the public dimensions of faculty work.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Point of View: Data science for the scientific life cycle

    Daphne Ezer, Kirstie Whitaker
    Each stage of the scientific life cycle stands to benefit from the introduction of data science techniques.
  3. Philosophy of Biology: Philosophical bias is the one bias that science cannot avoid

    Fredrik Andersen et al.
    Scientists should be aware of the non-empirical assumptions that influence all kinds of research.
    1. Ecology

    Biodiversity: Making wildlife welcome in urban areas

    Travis Gallo, Mason Fidino
    Careful design of the green spaces in cities will benefit both wild animals and humans.
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF
  4. Point of view: Motivating participation in open science by examining researcher incentives

    Sarah E Ali-Khan et al.
    A survey of researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital provides insights into the challenges and opportunities involved in adopting an open science policy across an entire patient-oriented academic institution.
  5. Research: Publication bias and the canonization of false facts

    Silas Boye Nissen et al.
    Publication bias, in which positive results are preferentially reported by authors and published by journals, can restrict the visibility of evidence against false claims and allow such claims to be canonized inappropriately as facts.
    1. Neuroscience

    Microbiome: Does the brain listen to the gut?

    Thomas Kuntz, Jack Gilbert
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF
  6. Point of View: Overflow in science and its implications for trust

    Sabina Siebert et al.
    Interviews with senior biomedical researchers reveal a perceived decline in trust in the scientific enterprise, in large part because the quantity of new data exceeds the field's ability to process it appropriately.