8 results found
    1. Ecology

    Ant colonies maintain social homeostasis in the face of decreased density

    Andreas P Modlmeier et al.
    Organizational resilience allows ant colonies to retain high interaction rates in the face of decreased density by altering their spatial and social dynamics.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    Point of View: Predictive regulation and human design

    Peter Sterling
    Why does the human regulatory system, which evolution tuned for small satisfactions, now constantly demand 'more'?
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Destructive disinfection of infected brood prevents systemic disease spread in ant colonies

    Christopher D Pull et al.
    Upon detecting a fatal infection using chemical cues, ants puncture the cuticle of sick brood and inject antimicrobial poison that disrupts the pathogen's life cycle and prevents it from reproducing, thus protecting the colony from disease.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Ecological feedback in quorum-sensing microbial populations can induce heterogeneous production of autoinducers

    Matthias Bauer et al.
    Quorum sensing enables heterogeneous production of autoinducers in microbial populations, suggesting an alternative mechanism to stochastic gene expression in bistable gene-regulatory circuits to control phenotypic heterogeneity.
    1. Neuroscience

    The roles of vision and antennal mechanoreception in hawkmoth flight control

    Ajinkya Dahake et al.
    Mechanosensors in the antennae of hawkmoths provide rapid sensory feedback for the control of fast flight manoeuvres, which acts in parallel to visual information.
    1. Ecology

    Sequential phenotypic constraints on social information use in wild baboons

    Alecia J Carter et al.
    Social information is a process encompassing information acquisition, application and exploitation that is constrained by an individual’s social, behavioural and demographic phenotype.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Disentangling strictly self-serving mutations from win-win mutations in a mutualistic microbial community

    Samuel Frederick Mock Hart et al.
    Whereas partner-serving phenotype is intuitively quantified as benefit release rate, molecular genetics revealed an example where this thinking fails, motivating a more general metric.
    1. Ecology

    Habitat and social factors shape individual decisions and emergent group structure during baboon collective movement

    Ariana Strandburg-Peshkin et al.
    For baboons on the move, habitat features across multiple spatial scales combine with social interactions to impact the movements of individuals, ultimately shaping the structure of the whole group.

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