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    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Phenotypic Diversity: Setting the bar

    Charles Y Feigin, Ricardo Mallarino
    Analyzing the genomes of rock pigeons demonstrates that genetic variation comes in many forms and can have unexpected origins.
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  1. Research: Publication bias and the canonization of false facts

    Silas Boye Nissen et al.
    Publication bias, in which positive results are preferentially reported by authors and published by journals, can restrict the visibility of evidence against false claims and allow such claims to be canonized inappropriately as facts.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology

    Cutting Edge: Anatomy of BioJS, an open source community for the life sciences

    Guy Yachdav et al.
    Community nurturing is the single most important factor in determining the sustainability of an open source project such as BioJS.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine

    Stem Cells: What silent mutations say about the human airways

    Matthew L Donne, Jason R Rock
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  2. Point of View: What does it take to recruit and retain senior women faculty?

    Fiona M Watt
    eLife deputy editor Fiona M Watt recounts some of her personal experiences as a senior female academic in a male-dominated environment.
    1. Neuroscience

    Neuroscience: Watching the brain in action

    Bradford Z Mahon
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    1. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Science Forum: Unit of analysis issues in laboratory-based research

    Nick R Parsons et al.
    A simulation study is used to demonstrate how mistakes in identifying the experimental unit and the unit of analysis can lead to incorrect analyses and inappropriate inferences when reporting research studies.
  3. Peer Review: Decisions, decisions

    Peter Rodgers
    Journals are exploring new approaches to peer review in order to reduce bias, increase transparency and respond to author preferences.
  4. Research: Gender bias in scholarly peer review

    Markus Helmer et al.
    Gender-bias in peer reviewing might persist even when gender-equity is reached because both male and female editors operate with a same-gender preference whose characteristics differ by editor-gender.