61 results found
    1. Neuroscience

    Loss of Frataxin induces iron toxicity, sphingolipid synthesis, and Pdk1/Mef2 activation, leading to neurodegeneration

    Kuchuan Chen et al.
    In Drosophila, the loss of Frataxin causes iron accumulation in the nervous system, which in turn enhances sphingolipid synthesis and activation of PDK1 and Mef2, which leads to neurodegeneration.
    1. Cell Biology

    A sphingolipid-dependent diffusion barrier confines ER stress to the yeast mother cell

    Lori Clay et al.
    Sphingolipids govern the compartmentalization of yeast cells through the assembly of lateral diffusion barriers in ER membranes.
    1. Neuroscience

    Loss of Frataxin activates the iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway in mammals

    Kuchuan Chen et al.
    The iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway is activated in mammals upon loss of Frataxin.
    1. Cell Biology

    The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    Florian Fröhlich et al.
    The retrograde vesicular trafficking GARP complex, which is mutated in a neurodegenerative disease, is important for sphingolipid homeostasis in yeast and mammalian cells.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    TORC2-dependent protein kinase Ypk1 phosphorylates ceramide synthase to stimulate synthesis of complex sphingolipids

    Alexander Muir et al.
    TORC2-Ypk1 signaling upregulates flux through the sphingolipid pathway not only by increasing the supply of long-chain base precursors, but also by increasing their use in synthesizing complex sphingolipids.
    1. Developmental Biology

    A novel sphingolipid-TORC1 pathway critically promotes postembryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Huanhu Zhu et al.
    A lipid acts to promote the development of nematode worm larvae through activation of an enzyme complex called TORC1.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

    Optical manipulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis using photoswitchable ceramides

    Matthijs Kol et al.
    Photoswitchable ceramides containing an azobenzene photoswitch behave as light-controllable substrates for both sphingomyelin synthase and glucosylceramide synthase.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Developmental Biology

    The ceramide synthase 2b gene mediates genomic sensing and regulation of sphingosine levels during zebrafish embryogenesis

    Karen Mendelson et al.
    Developing oocytes lacking Sphk2 sense high sphingosine levels and transcriptionally activate expression of the gene encoding Cers2b, to mediate a salvage pathway to reduce potentially toxic sphingosine.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Mitochondria-specific photoactivation to monitor local sphingosine metabolism and function

    Suihan Feng et al.
    Caged, photoactivatible sphingosine localized to mitochondria permits demonstration of the importance of subcellular localization on lipid metabolism and signaling.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Regulating G protein-coupled receptors by topological inversion

    Bray Denard et al.
    Multiple biochemical assays show that the topology of CCR5 and possibly other GPCRs may be inverted by ceramide or other sphingolipids through the process of regulated alternative translocation.

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