People

The working scientists who serve as eLife editors, our early-career advisors, governing board, and our executive staff all work in concert to realise eLife’s mission to accelerate discovery

Editor-in-Chief

  1. Randy Schekman

    Randy Schekman

    Editor-in-Chief

    Randy Schekman was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, with James Rothman and Thomas Sudhof. He is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His work concerns the mechanism of membrane assembly and vesicular traffic in eukaryotic cells. He and his laboratory discovered many of the genes and proteins required for secretion in yeast and they have applied this knowledge to understand human genetic diseases that affect core components of the secretory machinery. Among other awards, he shared the Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Lasker Award with James Rothman. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, he was elected President of the American Society for Cell Biology in 1999 and served as Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from 2006 to late 2011.

    Expertise
    Cell Biology
    Research focus
    membrane assembly
    vesicular trafficking
    protein transport
    animal and human cell biology

Deputy editors

  1. Eve Marder

    Eve Marder

    Deputy Editor

    Eve Marder is the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience at Brandeis University. Marder is a Past President of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Marder is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of the Biophysical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Society of Neuroethology. She received the Miriam Salpeter Award from WIN, the WF Gerard Prize from the SfN, the Miller Prize from the Society for Cognitive Neuroscience, the Karl Spenser Lashley Prize from the American Philosophical Society, and the Gruber Prize in Neuroscience. Marder served on the NIH BRAIN Initiative working group. Marder studies the dynamics of small neuronal networks, and her work was instrumental in demonstrating that neuronal circuits are not "hard-wired" but are reconfigured by neuromodulators to produce a variety of outputs. She now studies the extent to which similar network performance can arise from different sets of network parameters.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    systems neuroscience
    neurobiology
    central pattern generators
    neuromodulation
    homeostasis
    circuit dynamics
    neuronal excitability
    computational models of neuronal dynamics
  2. Fiona Watt

    Fiona Watt

    Deputy Editor

    Fiona Watt is internationally recognised for elucidating the mechanisms that control epidermal stem cell renewal, differentiation and tissue assembly, and discovering how those processes are deregulated in disease. She obtained her DPhil from Oxford University and was a postdoc at MIT. She established her first laboratory at the Kennedy Institute in London and then moved to the Cancer Research UK (CR-UK) London Research Institute (formerly known as the Imperial Cancer Research Fund), where she worked for 20 years. From 2007 to 2012 she was the inaugural Herchel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Cambridge, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research and Deputy Director of the CR-UK Cambridge Research Institute. Since 2012 she has been Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King’s College London. Fiona Watt is a member of EMBO, a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society and an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Expertise
    Cancer Biology
    Developmental Biology and Stem Cells
    Research focus
    cancer biology
    stem cell biology
    biology cancer cell stem
  3. Detlef Weigel

    Detlef Weigel

    Deputy Editor

    Detlef Weigel received his PhD in 1988 from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. After postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty of the Salk Institute in 1993. Since 2002, he has been director of the Department of Molecular Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. His current research interests focus on natural genetic variation and evolutionary genomics of plants. Examples of recent important projects are the 1001 Genomes project for Arabidopsis thaliana, and the systematic dissection of deleterious epistasis between Arabidopsis strains due to autoimmunity. Among the awards he has received are the Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Otto Bayer Award. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society.

    Expertise
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Plant Biology
    Research focus
    natural variation
    epigenetics
    evolutionary genomics
    plant biology
    genomics
    evolutionary biology

Senior editors

  1. Anna Akhmanova

    Anna Akhmanova

    Senior Editor

    Anna Akhmanova is a Professor of Cell Biology at the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She studied biochemistry and molecular biology at the Moscow State University and obtained her PhD at the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Akhmanova studies cytoskeletal organization and trafficking processes, which contribute to cell polarization, differentiation, vertebrate development and human disease. The main focus of the work in her group is the microtubule cytoskeleton. Research in the group relies on combining high-resolution live cell imaging and quantitative analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics with in vitro reconstitution experiments. Her work has resulted in identification and characterization of a broad variety of factors which control microtubule organization and dynamics and motor attachment to membrane organelles. Anna Akhmanova is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Expertise
    Cell Biology
    Research focus
    cytoskeletal dynamics
    microtubule-binding proteins
    microtubule-based motors
    membrane transport
  2. Richard Aldrich

    Richard Aldrich

    Senior Editor

    Rick Aldrich is the Karl Folkers Chair II in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research and Professor of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin. He joined the faculty in 2006 and served as chair until 2011. Previously he was on the faculty of Neurobiology (1985-1990) and of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (1990-2006) at Stanford University where he served as department chair from 2001–2004. He was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1990 to 2006. His work is on molecular mechanisms of ion channels and calcium signaling proteins, with an emphasis on understanding gated conformational changes and allosteric mechanisms. Work in the laboratory is multidisciplinary including electrophysiology, biochemistry, spectroscopy, informatics and computation. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He is past president of the Biophysical Society and the Society of General Physiologists, and has received the Kenneth Cole Award for Membrane Physiology from the Biophysical Society and Alden Spencer Award for Neuroscience Research from Columbia University.

    Expertise
    Biophysics and Structural Biology
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    ion channels
    calcium binding proteins
    membrane transport
    allostery and cooperativity
    cellular neurophysiology
    biochemical neuroscience
  3. Ian Baldwin

    Ian Baldwin

    Senior Editor

    Ian Baldwin studied biology and chemistry at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and graduated 1981 with an AB. In 1989, he received a PhD in Chemical Ecology from Cornell University, in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. He was an Assistant (1989), Associate (1993) and Full Professor (1996) in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. In 1996 he became the Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, where he now heads of the Department of Molecular Ecology. In 1999 he was appointed Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. In 2002 he founded the International Max Planck Research School at the Max Planck Institute in Jena. Baldwin's scientific work is devoted to understanding the traits that allow plants to survive in the real world. To achieve this, he has developed a molecular toolbox for the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) and a graduate program that trains “genome-enabled field biologists” to combine genomic and molecular genetic tools with field work to understand the genes that matter for plant-herbivore, -pollinator, -plant, -microbial interactions under real-world conditions. He has also been a driver behind the open-access publication efforts of the Max Planck Society.

    Expertise
    Ecology
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Plant Biology
    Research focus
    evolutionary biology
    plant biology
    evolution and ecology
    secondary metabolism
    organismic level gene function
  4. Naama Barkai

    Naama Barkai

    Senior Editor

    Naama Barkai is a systems and computational biologist interested in how bio-molecular circuits are designed. She joined the Weizmann Institute in 1999, following a post-doc (Princeton) and graduate studies (Hebrew University) in physics. She is currently chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics, and the head of the Azrieli and Kahan Centers for Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute. In 2013, Barkai was elected to a Vallee Foundation Visiting Professorship and awarded the Abisch Frankel prize.

    Expertise
    Computational and Systems Biology
    Research focus
    systems biology
    modeling
    functional genomics
    yeast genetics
    morphogen gradients
  5. Timothy Behrens

    Timothy Behrens

    Senior Editor

    Tim Behrens is Professor of Computational Neuroscience at Oxford University and University College London, and a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow. His work investigating the neural mechanisms that control behaviour has made an impact across scales from cells to brain regions across mammalian species. He has also developed widely used approaches for measuring brain connections non-invasively that have been taken up by the Human Connectome Project, where he is a senior investigator and chair of the anatomical connectivity team.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    brain imaging
    fMRI
    learning
    cognition
    behavioural neuroscience
    learning and decision making
    brain connectivity
    computational neuroscience
    neural coding
    Experimental organism
    macaque monkeys
  6. Marianne E Bronner

    Marianne E Bronner

    Senior Editor

    Marianne Bronner is a developmental biologist with a long-standing interest in specification, migration and differentiation of neural crest stem cells. Using a pan-vertebrate approach, her lab has been systematically studying the gene regulatory network responsible for neural crest formation and evolutionary origin. Born in Budapest, Hungary, Marianne’s family escaped to Austria during the Hungarian revolution when she was a small child. She received her ScB in Biophysics from Brown University and then a PhD in Biophysics from Johns Hopkins University. She assumed her first faculty position at the University of California, Irvine, before moving to Caltech in 1996. Marianne received the Conklin Medal from The Society for Developmental Biology in 2013, the Women in Cell Biology Senior Award from the American Society for Cell Biology in 2012, as well as several teaching awards from her institution. She was elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2015.

    Expertise
    Developmental Biology and Stem Cells
    Research focus
    neural crest
    peripheral nervous system
    placodes
    developmental neurobiology
    vertebrate development biology
    cell lineage
    cell migration
    vertebrate evolution
    Experimental organism
    chick
    lamprey
    zebrafish
    xenopus
  7. Arup K Chakraborty

    Arup K Chakraborty

    Senior Editor

    Arup Chakraborty is the Robert T Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at MIT. He is the founding Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He is also a founding steering committee member of the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. Chakraborty was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley from December 1988 to September 2005, after which he moved to MIT. The central theme of his research since 2000 is the development and application of theoretical/computational approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, to aid the quest for mechanistic principles in immunology, and then harness this understanding to aid the design of vaccines against mutable pathogens (e.g., HIV). A characteristic of his work is the impact of his studies on experimental immunology and clinical studies (he collaborates extensively with immunologists). Arup’s work at the interface of the physical and life sciences has been recognized by honors that include an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the EO Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Arup is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Expertise
    Biophysics and Structural Biology
    Computational and Systems Biology
    Immunology
    Research focus
    computational biology
    immunology
    statistical mechanics
    signaling
    virology
    protein evolution
  8. Philip Cole

    Senior Editor

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Research focus
    chemical biology
    signal transduction
    epigenetics
  9. Jonathan A Cooper

    Jonathan A Cooper

    Senior Editor

    Jon Cooper is a member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he is also a Senior Vice-President and Director of the Division of Basic Sciences. He holds an Affiliate Professor appointment in the Biochemistry department at the University of Washington. After undergraduate studies at the University of Cambridge and post-graduate research at the University of Warwick, he performed postdoctoral research with Bernard Moss at the NIH and with Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute. With Tony, he found that oncogenic retroviruses (Rous sarcoma virus and others) and growth factors (EGF and PDGF) stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of overlapping subsets of cell proteins, which were candidates to regulate cell proliferation and metabolism. He joined Fred Hutch in 1985 to continue the work he started at the Salk, investigating the mechanisms by which protein kinases regulate cell proliferation and transformation. His laboratory played important roles in establishing how Src is regulated, how activated growth factor receptors recruit signaling proteins, and Ras-Raf-MAPK signaling. In 1995, postdoc Brian Howell knocked out the gene for a Src substrate and observed a distinctive brain development phenotype. Efforts by several laboratories rapidly established a signaling pathway that regulates neuron migrations during brain development. Further studies on this pathway revealed the importance of ubiquitination and degradation for terminating signaling, and led in recent years to detailed investigation of the roles of Cullin-RING ligases in regulating signal transduction events in vivo and in cultured cells.

    Expertise
    Cell Biology
    Research focus
    signaling pathways
    cell migration
    phosphorylation
    cell transformation
  10. Harry Dietz

    Harry Dietz

    Senior Editor

    Dr Dietz is Victor A McKusick Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Molecular Biology & Genetics in the Institute of Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His undergraduate training in biomedical engineering was performed at Duke University and his MD degree was received from the Health Sciences University of Syracuse. Clinical and research training in pediatrics, pediatric cardiology, and genetics occurred at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr Dietz’s research is focused on elucidation of the etiology and pathogenesis of connective tissue disorders that involve the cardiovascular system. Dr Dietz has received multiple prestigious awards including the Curt Stern Award from the American Society of Human Genetics, the Taubman Prize for excellence in translational medical science, and the Harrington Prize from the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Harrington Discovery Institute. He is an inductee of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academy of American Physicians, The National Academy of Medicine, Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Sciences.

    Expertise
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Research focus
    human genetics
    extracellular matrix
    connective tissue disorders
    genetics of cardiovascular disease
  11. Ivan Dikic

    Ivan Dikic

    Senior Editor

    Ivan Dikic is a Professor and Chairman of Institute of Biochemistry II at the Medical School Goethe University and a member of the Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences in Frankfurt. He was trained as a medical doctor at Zagreb University and obtained his PhD in molecular biology with Joseph Schlessinger. His career is focused on studying intracellular signaling initially via protein tyrosine kinases where he revealed how multiple monoubiquitination controls EGFR endocytosis. His lab has pioneered a concept of Ubiquitin as a multivalent cellular signal that regulates multitude of physiological and pathophysiological processes including DNA repair, inflammation, cancer, infection and proteasomal degradation. Ivan’s group also provided structural and functional evidence for a new type of Ub chains that are Met1-linked (called linear ubiquitination) in promoting the NF-kB signaling. His current interests focus on selective autophagy, which is essential for the clearance of protein aggregates, pathogens, and damaged mitochondria from the cell. He has received many awards for his work including the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research, the Award of European Association for Cancer Research, the Hans Krebs Prize, the Leibniz Award and the Ernst Jung Award in Medicine. He is a Member of the German Academy for Sciences Leopoldina, Academia Europaea, Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Cell Biology
    Research focus
    ubiquitination
    autophagy
    endocytosis
    inflammation
    cancer biology
  12. Catherine Dulac

    Catherine Dulac

    Senior Editor

    Catherine Dulac is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences at Harvard University. Her work explores the molecular biology of pheromone detection and signaling in mammals, and the neural mechanisms underlying age-, species-, and sex-specific behaviors. She graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris; received her PhD from the University of Paris VI at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Embryology (Nogent-sur-Marne); and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and a member of the French Academy of Sciences, Institute of France. She is a recipient of the Liliane Bettencourt Prize, the Richard Lounsbery Award, the Perl/UNC Neuroscience Prize and the IPSEN Foundation Neuronal Plasticity prize.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    cellular and molecular neuroscience
    molecular and genetic basis of sex and species-specific social behavior
  13. Wendy S Garrett

    Wendy S Garrett

    Senior Editor

    Wendy Garrett is the Melvin J and Geraldine L. Glimcher Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute. Her work explores host-microbiota interactions underlying mucosal immune homeostasis, gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders, and cancer. She graduated from the Yale College; received her MD PhD from Yale University and completed post-graduate training at Harvard.

    Expertise
    Immunology
    Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    Research focus
    host-microbiota interactions
    microbiome
    mucosal immunology
  14. Christian S Hardtke

    Christian S Hardtke

    Senior Editor

    Christian Hardtke obtained a PhD in Developmental Biology from the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich in 1997 for his work on plant embryogenesis. He then moved to Yale University as an HFSP postdoctoral fellow to study photomorphogenesis, before joining McGill University as Assistant Professor in 2001. He was appointed Associate Professor at the University of Lausanne in 2004, where he became Full Professor and director of the Department of Plant Molecular Biology in 2010. His research revolves around the molecular genetic control of plant development, with a focus on quantitative aspects of plant growth and morphology. He is particularly interested in mechanisms of vascular tissue differentiation and their relation to root system architecture, as well as the intersection of these mechanisms with natural genetic variation.

    Expertise
    Plant Biology
    Research focus
    store-operated calcium channels
    plant development
    Arabidopsis
    brachypodium
    natural variation
    developmental cell biology
    Experimental organism
    birds
  15. Richard Ivry

    Richard Ivry

    Senior Editor

    Rich Ivry is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. Ivry studies various aspects of human performance using behavioral studies in healthy and neurologically impaired populations, brain stimulation, neuroimaging, and computational modeling. His work has advanced our understanding of how people select and implement movements, and acquire new motor skills, with a special interest in how subcortical systems interact with the cortex in sensorimotor control and learning. For over a decade, Ivry served as an associate editor for the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience and is co-author of the textbook, The Cognitive Neurosciences: The Biology of the Mind.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    cognitive neuroscience and psychology
    non-invasive brain stimulation
    human performance
    sensorimotor control and learning
  16. Prabhat Jha

    Prabhat Jha

    Senior Editor

    Prabhat Jha has been a key figure in epidemiology and economics of global health for the past decade. He is the University of Toronto Endowed Professor in Disease Control and Canada Research Chair at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the founding Director of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Professor Jha is a lead investigator of the Million Death Study in India, which quantifies the causes of premature mortality in over one million homes from 1997–2014 and which examines the contribution of key risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, diet, and environmental exposures. He is co-investigator of the Disease Control Priorities Network and the author of several influential books on tobacco control, including two that helped enable a global treaty on tobacco control, now signed by over 160 countries. Prior to founding CGHR, Professor Jha served as Senior Scientist for the World Health Organization, where he co-led the work on health and poverty for the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health. Earlier, he headed the World Bank team responsible for developing the Second National HIV/AIDS Control Program in India. His advisory work has included the Government of South Africa on its national health insurance plan, and the United States Institute of Medicine on global health. Notable recognitions include the Order of Canada (2013) for contributions to global health, the Luther Terry Award for Research on Tobacco Control (2012), The Globe and Mail 25 Transformational Canadians (2010), Top 40 Canadians under Age 40 Award (2004), the Ontario Premier’s Research Excellence Award (2004), and Gold Medal from the Poland Health Promotion Foundation (2000). Professor Jha holds an MD from the University of Manitoba and a DPhil from Oxford University, where he studied as a Canadian Rhodes Scholar.

    Expertise
    Epidemiology and Global Health
    Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    Research focus
    epidemiology
    global health
    infectious disease and population dynamics
    randomized controlled trials
  17. Sabine Kastner

    Sabine Kastner

    Senior Editor

    Sabine Kastner is Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology at Princeton University. Kastner studies the neural basis of visual perception, attention, and awareness in the primate brain using a combination of electrophysiology and neuroimaging methods. She has made numerous contributions particularly to the functional organization of the human attention network, the parcellation of the human parietal cortex, the role of the thalamus in perception and cognition, and the topographic and functional organization of the human visual system. Kastner has served as Reviewing and Senior Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience and currently serves as the Specialty Chief Editor for ‘Frontiers for young minds’ - Understanding neuroscience, the first open-access journal for children 8-14 that educates about neuroscience research.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    cognitive and systems neuroscience
    neuroimaging and intracranial electrophysiology
    experimental models: human and monkey brain
  18. Andrew J King

    Andrew J King

    Senior Editor

    Andrew King is Professor of Neurophysiology and a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, where he heads the Auditory Neuroscience Group in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. His research uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the neural basis for auditory perception and multisensory integration. His group is currently investigating the representation and coding of sound features by populations of neurons, how neural responses adjust to changes in the statistical distribution of sounds associated with different acoustic environments, and the capacity of the brain to compensate for the changes in inputs that result from hearing loss. He was awarded the Wellcome Prize in Physiology in 1990 and was made a Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    auditory system
    auditory perception
    multisensory integration
  19. John Kuriyan

    John Kuriyan

    Senior Editor

    John Kuriyan is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and also of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Before this, he was on the faculty at The Rockefeller University, New York, where he began his career in 1987, leaving for Berkeley in 2001. Since 1990, he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Kuriyan completed undergraduate studies in chemistry at Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA. His doctoral research, on the dynamics of proteins, was carried out at MIT, under the guidance of Greg Petsko and Martin Karplus (Harvard University). Kuriyan’s research is aimed at understanding the structure and mechanism of the enzymes and molecular switches that carry out cellular signal transduction and DNA replication. His laboratory uses x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins involved in signaling and replication, as well as biochemical, biophysical, and computational analyses to elucidate mechanisms. Kuriyan was elected to the US National Academy of Sciences in 2001.

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Biophysics and Structural Biology
    Research focus
    protein science and biochemistry
    signaling
    crystallography
    electron microscopy
    modeling
    molecular dynamics
  20. Wenhui Li

    Wenhui Li

    Senior Editor

    Wenhui Li is an Investigator of the National Institute of Biological Sciences (NIBS), Beijing, China. He received a bachelor’s degree in medicine from the Medical School of Lanzhou University in 1994 and his PhD from the Peking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in 2001. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School, Li joined NIBS as an Assistant Investigator in 2007 and rose to the rank of Investigator in 2015. His team at NIBS identified a liver bile acids transporter (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide, NTCP) as a functional receptor for Hepatitis B and D virus. Li’s research interest has been focusing on the molecular mechanisms of viral infections: currently his laboratory combines virology, biochemistry, immunology, and chemical biology to investigate molecular mechanisms of HBV/HDV infection.

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    Research focus
    virus infection
    hepatitis b/d virus
    receptor
    antivirals
  21. Vivek Malhotra

    Senior Editor

    Vivek Malhotra was a professor in the biology division at UC San Diego from 2007 and is now the ICREA Professor and Chair of the Cell and Developmental Biology at Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona. His research focuses on a central station of the secretory pathway, the Golgi complex. Specifically, his work has resulted in the identification of the machinery required for the sorting and packaging of secretory cargoes. His recent work has uncovered a novel secretory routing that bypasses the conventional pathway of protein secretion. He has identified new genes required for the export of bulky collagens and the regulated secretion of mucins. He received his BSc from Stirling University and was a Pirie–Reid scholar at Oxford; a Damon Runyon Walter Winchell and an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at Stanford; and Basil O’Conner scholar, established Investigator of the American Heart Association, and Senior Investigator of Sandler’s Foundation for Asthma at UC San Diego. He received the MERCK award from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is a fellow of the American association of the arts and science, and is an elected EMBO member.

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Cell Biology
    Research focus
    Golgi apparatus: biogenesis, structure, and function
    Collagen and Mucin secretion
  22. James Manley

    James Manley

    Senior Editor

    James Manley received a BS from Columbia University, a PhD from Stony Brook/Cold Spring Harbor Labs, and did postdoctoral work at MIT. He has been in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University since 1980, was Chair from 1995–2001, and Julian Clarence Levi Professor of Life Sciences since 1995. His research interests center on understanding the mechanisms and regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, especially with regard to mRNA splicing and 3’ end formation; how these processes are linked to transcription, cell signaling pathways, and maintenance of genomic stability; and how they contribute to cell differentiation and disease. He has authored or coauthored nearly 300 research articles and reviews on these topics, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. Dr. Manley is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Expertise
    Genes and Chromosomes
    Research focus
    chromosomes and gene expression
    transcription
    RNA processing
    translation
    RNA localization and turnover
  23. Michael Marletta

    Michael Marletta

    Senior Editor

    Michael Marletta is the Aldo DeBenedictis Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Previous to his appointment at UC Berkeley, he was a former President and CEO of The Scripps Research Institute. He has also been on the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he was an HHMI Investigator, and MIT. Marletta obtained an A.B. in chemistry and biology from the State University of New York at Fredonia, a Ph.D. from UCSF under George Kenyon and, after a postdoctoral appointment at MIT under Chris Walsh, began his independent career. His work has spanned protein chemistry and enzymology. He has made many contributions to our understanding of nitric oxide signaling and more generally in molecular mechanisms of gas sensing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. More recent studies have involved novel enzymes involved with cellulose degradation. Marletta is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Expertise
    Biochemistry
    Research focus
    chemical biology
    nitric oxide signaling
    gas sensing
    structural basis of enzyme activity
  24. Mark McCarthy

    Mark McCarthy

    Senior Editor

    Mark McCarthy is the Robert Turner Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Oxford, based at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. He is also a Consultant Physician at the Oxford University Hospitals Trust and is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Geneva. Following medical training in Cambridge and London, a spell as an MRC Travelling Fellow at the Whitehead Institute in Massachusetts, and 8 years at Imperial College, he moved to Oxford in 2002. He is a physician-scientist and human geneticist interested in the biological basis of complex disease. His research group is focused on the identification and characterisation of genetic variants influencing risk of type 2 diabetes and related traits, and on using those discoveries to drive biological inference and translational opportunities. He works closely with colleagues in Oxford and beyond to establish the mechanisms whereby T2D-risk variants influence islet function, and to explore the value of this information to drive clinical advances. He has played a major role in establishing and leading a number of the global initiatives in this field including the DIAGRAM, MAGIC, GIANT, EGG, GoT2D, ENGAGE, and T2D-GENES consortia. He has been a Senior Editor at eLife since 2015.

    Expertise
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Research focus
    genetics
    metabolism
    genome wide association and resequencing studies
    systems biology
    human genetics and genomics
    multifactorial disease
    metabolic disease
    biomarkers
  25. Sean Morrison

    Sean Morrison

    Senior Editor

    The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. Dr Morrison obtained his BSc in biology and chemistry from Dalhousie University (1991), then completed a PhD in immunology at Stanford University (1996), and a postdoctoral fellowship in neurobiology at Caltech (1999). From 1999 to 2011, Dr Morrison was at the University of Michigan where he Directed their Center for Stem Cell Biology. Recently, Dr Morrison moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he is the founding Director of the new Children’s Research Institute. Dr Morrison’s laboratory studies the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, as well as the role these mechanisms play in cancer. Dr Morrison was a Searle Scholar (2000–2003), was named in Technology Review Magazine’s list of 100 young innovators (2002), received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2003), the International Society for Hematology and Stem Cell’s McCulloch and Till Award (2007), the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award (2008), and a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Morrison has also been active in public policy issues surrounding stem cells. For example, he has twice testified before Congress and was a leader in the successful “Proposal 2” campaign to protect stem cell research in Michigan’s state constitution.

    Expertise
    Cancer Biology
    Developmental Biology and Stem Cells
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Research focus
    tissue stem cells
    blood
    cancer biology
    hematopoietic system
  26. Andrea Musacchio

    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Germany

    Andrea Musacchio is Director of the Department of Mechanistic Cell Biology at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund (Germany) since 2011, and he is also adjunct professor at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Before this, he worked at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan (Italy), where he established his first laboratory as an independent investigator in 1999. Musacchio completed undergraduate studies at the University of Rome-Tor Vergata and moved for his graduate studies to the EMBL in Heidelberg, working under the guidance of Dr. Matti Saraste on the structural analysis of signalling domains. He later moved to do his postdoctoral training at the Harvard Medical School under the guidance of Prof. Stephen C. Harrison, working on structures of clathrin. Work in the Musacchio laboratory focuses on the biochemical reconstitution, structural analysis, and functional investigation of kinetochores and centromeres, structures required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Musacchio is EMBO Member since 2009.

    Expertise
    Cell Biology
    Biochemistry
    Biophysics and Structural Biology
    Research focus
    kinetochore
    cell cycle
    centromere
  27. Michel C Nussenzweig

    Michel C Nussenzweig

    Senior Editor

    Michel Nussenzweig is the Zanvil A Cohn and Ralph Steinman Professor of Molecular Immunology and a Senior Physician at the Rockefeller University Hospital. Since 1990 he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr Nussenzweig obtained his PhD working with Dr Ralph Steinman on the role of Dendritic Cells in initiating immunity. He received his MD degree from New York University Medical School and trained in Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Massachusetts General Hospital. As a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr Philip Leder in the Deparment of Genetics at Harvard Medical School he became interested in the development of antibody producing B lymphocytes. Dr Nussenzweig’s current research is focused on understanding the development of humoral immune responses. His laboratory uses molecular biology, mouse genetics, and perfoms experimental medicine studies in human volunteers to elucidate basic principles in immunology and medicine. Dr Nussenzweig was elected to the US National Academy of Medicine in 2009 and the US National Academy of Sciences in 2011.

    Expertise
    Immunology
    Research focus
    adaptive immunity
    innate immunity
    HIV
    dendritic cells
  28. Aviv Regev

    Aviv Regev

    Senior Editor

    Aviv Regev is a computational biologist who joined the Broad Institute as a core member and MIT as a faculty member in 2006. Her work investigates how complex molecular networks function and evolve in the face of genetic and environmental changes, over time-scales ranging from minutes to millions of years. Regev received her MSc from Tel Aviv University, studying biology, computer science, and mathematics in the Interdisciplinary Program for the Fostering of Excellence, where she undertook research in both theoretical and experimental biology. She received her PhD in computational biology from Tel Aviv University. Prior to joining the Broad Institute, Regev was a fellow at the Bauer Center for Genomics Research at Harvard University, where she developed new approaches to the reconstruction of regulatory networks and modules from genomic data. Regev is also an associate professor in the Department of Biology at MIT
and director of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad. Regev is the Director of the Cell Circuits Program at the Broad and a lead principal investigator for the Center for Cell Circuits at the Broad Institute, a Center of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS). Regev has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist since 2009, and was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in 2013. She is a recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, a Sloan fellowship from the Sloan Foundation, the Overton Prize from the International Society for Computational Biology, and the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).

    (Image Credit: Maria Nemchuk)

    Expertise
    Computational and Systems Biology
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Research focus
    systems biology
    molecular networks
    computational biology
    single cell genomics
    regulatory networks
    systems immunology
    gene regulation
    evolution
  29. Charles Sawyers

    Charles Sawyers

    Senior Editor

    Charles Sawyers is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His studies of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase function in chronic myeloid leukemia, in collaboration with Brian Druker and Novartis, led to the development of the kinase inhibitor imatinib as primary therapy for CML. This was followed by his discovery that BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations confer imatinib resistance, and development of the second generation Abl kinase inhibitor dasatinib, in collaboration with Bristol Myers Squibb. Sawyers' current work in prostate cancer resulted in the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (MDV3100), discovered in collaboration with University of California, Los Angeles chemist Michael Jung, which received FDA approval in 2012. Sawyers is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and co-recipient of the 2009 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.

    Expertise
    Cancer Biology
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Research focus
    oncology and translational medicine
    oncology
    translational medicine
  30. Didier Stainier

    Didier Stainier

    Senior Editor

    Didier Stainier is the director of the Department of Developmental Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Bad Nauheim (Frankfurt), Germany. He studied Biology in Wales, Belgium and the USA (Brandeis University) where he got a BA in 1984. He then received his PhD in Biochemistry and Biophysics from Harvard University (1990) where he investigated the cellular basis of axon guidance and target recognition in the developing mouse brain with Wally Gilbert. After a Helen Hay Whitney postdoctoral fellowship with Mark Fishman at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston), where he initiated the studies on zebrafish cardiac development, he set up his lab at the University of California, San Francisco in 1995, where he expanded his research to investigate questions of cell differentiation, tissue morphogenesis, organ homeostasis and function, as well as organ regeneration, in the zebrafish cardiovascular system and endodermal organs. In 2012, he moved to the Max Planck Institute where he continues to utilize both forward and reverse genetic approaches to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms of developmental processes during vertebrate organ formation, in both zebrafish and mouse. He is also an Honorary Professor at Goethe University in Frankfurt. In addition to research and mentorship awards at UCSF, he was a Packard Fellow, Basil O’Connor scholar, established Investigator of the American Heart Association, received the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award in Developmental Biology, and was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academia Europaea and European Molecular Biology Organization, as well as an Officier de l’ordre de Léopold de Belgique.

    Expertise
    Developmental Biology and Stem Cells
    Research focus
    developmental genetics
    organogenesis
    tissue morphogenesis
    organ homeostasis
    Experimental organism
    zebrafish
  31. Gisela Storz

    Gisela Storz

    Senior Editor

    Gisela Storz has been an Investigator in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Maryland since 1991. She obtained a BA in Biochemistry from the University of Colorado in 1984 and a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1988, where she studied the bacterial response to oxidative stress working with Bruce Ames. Her current work is focused on understanding gene regulation in response to environmental signals and elucidating the roles of small RNAs and small proteins of less than 50 amino acids in these regulatory networks. Dr. Storz was the recipient of the American Society for Microbiology Eli Lilly Award and is a member of the American Academy of Microbiology, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and US National Academy of Sciences.

    Expertise
    Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    Research focus
    small noncoding RNAs
    oxidative stress
    gene regulation
    bacterial physiology
    regulatory RNAs
    Experimental organism
    E. coli
  32. Kevin Struhl

    Kevin Struhl

    Senior Editor

    Kevin Struhl received a BS and MS from MIT, a PhD from Stanford University Medical School, and did postdoctoral work at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. He has been in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School since 1982, was acting Chair from 1997–98, and has been the David Wesley Gaiser Professor since 1991. His research combines genetic, molecular, genomic, and evolutionary approaches to address a wide variety of fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structure in yeast. In addition, he is interested in elucidating transcriptional regulatory circuits that mediate the process of cellular transformation and the formation of cancer stem cells. He has authored or co-authored nearly 300 research articles and reviews, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He received the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and is a Distinguished Researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in Crete. Dr. Struhl is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Medicine.

    Expertise
    Cancer Biology
    Genes and Chromosomes
    Research focus
    transcription mechanisms
    gene regulation
    chromatin
    mRNA decay
    biological function
    cellular transformation
    cancer stem cells
  33. Tadatsugu Taniguchi

    Tadatsugu Taniguchi

    Senior Editor

    Tada Taniguchi is Professor Emeritus of The University of Tokyo and Project Professor of the Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Industrial Science of The University. He also serves as Director of the Max Planck–The University of Tokyo Center for Integrative Inflammology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Zurich. His work principally concerns the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene expression that underlie immunity and oncogenesis. Many of his research projects have stemmed from his original discovery of two cytokine genes, interferon-beta and interleukin-2. These discoveries have laid the groundwork for the molecular characterization of the various systems of cytokines as well as therapeutic advances achieved by the administration of cytokines. One extension of this research was his discovery of a new family of transcription factors, the interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), which he and others have since identified as playing integral roles in the regulation of the immunity, inflammation and cancer. He has received numerous awards, including the Robert Koch Prize, Pezcoller-AACR International Award for Cancer Research, and was bestowed the Person of Cultural Merit award from the Government of Japan. He was also elected Foreign Associate Member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, in 2003 and International Member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2016.

    Expertise
    Immunology
    Research focus
    inflammation
    innate immunity
    adaptive immunity
    immunological disease
    tumor immunity
    gene regulation in immune cells
    signaling in immune cells
    gene regulation in host defence
  34. Diethard Tautz

    Diethard Tautz

    Senior Editor

    Diethard Tautz is since 2006 Director of the Department for Evolutionary Genetics at the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, Germany. He did his PhD at the EMBL in Heidelberg, followed by postdoc phases on molecular evolution in Cambridge (UK) and on the molecular analysis of developmental processes in Drosophila at the MPI for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, where he joined the group of Herbert Jäckle. In 1991 he became Professor in the Department of Zoology in Munich and in 1998 he moved to a chair in "Evolutionary Genetics" at the Department of Genetics of the University of Cologne. In his research, he combined his interests in molecular evolution and developmental biology, and was one of the founders of the emerging Evo-Devo field. In parallel, he worked on questions of behavioral ecology and speciation mechanisms, based on his discovery of microsatellite-based DNA fingerprinting. His current interests center around studying the genetics of adaptations, using wild populations of the house mouse as a model system. He is also continuing his work on molecular evolution, with a special emphasis on the de novo evolution of genes. He has served as Editor-in-Chief for Development, Genes and Evolution, and was a co-founder of the open-access journal Frontiers in Zoology.

    Expertise
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Research focus
    evolutionary genetics
    population genomics
    molecular evolution
    evolution of development
    comparative genomics
    adaptation
    behavioral ecology
    speciation
  35. Jessica Tyler

    Jessica Tyler

    Senior Editor

    Jessica Tyler was born in England in 1969. After graduating from the University of Sheffield with a Bachelors degree and the Hans Krebs Prize in Biochemistry, she performed her PhD studies at the MRC Virology Unit in Glasgow, Scotland. During her postdoctoral studies with Dr James Kadonaga at the University of California, San Diego, she identified the key chromatin assembly factors Anti-silencing Function 1 (Asf1) and characterized Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) from Drosophila. In 2000, Dr Tyler started her first faculty position in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, USA. In the next 10 years, Dr Tyler revealed that chromatin assembly and disassembly not only regulates S phase events, but also gene expression and the DNA damage response. Dr Tyler was a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar and was awarded the Charlotte Friend Woman in Cancer Research Award for 2009 from the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR). Having risen rapidly to the rank of full professor at the University of Colorado, Dr Tyler moved in 2010 to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Her recent work has extended to the broader influence of chromatin assembly on mitosis, aging and cancer. She is now in the Department of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis, where she co-directs the Center for Cancer Epigenetics and holds the Edward Rotan Distinguished Professorship in Cancer Research. Her most proud achievement is being mother to 11 year-old triplets. In November 2015, she became a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York.

    Expertise
    Genes and Chromosomes
    Research focus
    epigenetic regulation
    chromatin
    gene expression
    mitosis
    aging
    cancer
  36. David Van Essen

    David Van Essen

    Senior Editor

    David Van Essen is Alumni Endowed Professor of Neurobiology at Washington University in St Louis. He is internationally known for his research on the structure, function, connectivity, and development of cerebral cortex in humans and nonhuman primates. He is a pioneer in neuroinformatics and data sharing efforts in neuroscience. He was Chair of the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology (1992–2012) and was previously on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (1976–1992). He has served as President of the Society for Neuroscience, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience, founding chair of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, and president of the Association of Medical School Neuroscience Department Chairs. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received the Krieg Cortical Discoverer Award from the Cajal Club, the Peter Raven Lifetime Achievement Award from the St Louis Academy of Science, and the Second Century Award from the Washington University School of Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator for the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project, a large-scale effort to characterize brain connectivity and its relation to behavior in a large population of healthy young adults.

    Expertise
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    cerebral cortex
    neuroanatomy
    neuroimaging
    systems neurophysiology
    vision
    non-human primates
  37. K VijayRaghavan

    K VijayRaghavan

    Senior Editor

    Vijay’s research aims to understand motor- and olfactory- circuit assembly: from deciphering how each component is made, interacts, and stabilises into functioning in the animal to allow behaviour in the real world. Related to the development of network function is its maintenance in the mature animal; another aspect of the work in the laboratory addresses how mature neurons and muscles are maintained. The laboratory uses a genetic approach, mainly using the fruit fly but also collaborating with those using mouse and cell-culture. VijayRaghavan is Secretary to the Government of India in the Ministry of Science and Technology in the Department of Biotechnology. He temporarily holds additional charge of the Department of Biotechnology. VijayRaghavan’s research continues at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Bangalore, India, where he is Distinguished Professor. He studied engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. His doctoral work was at TIFR, Mumbai and postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology. VijayRaghavan is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Foreign Associate of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Expertise
    Developmental Biology and Stem Cells
    Genes and Chromosomes
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    genetics and genomics
    developmental biology
    neurogenetics
    neurobiology
    genetic basis of behavior
  38. Gary Westbrook

    Gary Westbrook

    Senior Editor

    Gary Westbrook is a Senior Scientist and Co-Director of the Vollum Institute and Rocky and Julie Dixon Professor of Neurology at Oregon Health and Science University. Dr Westbrook is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Neuroscience. He has received Javits and Merit awards from NIH for his research as well as an International Cooperation Award from the Max Planck Society. Dr Westbrook received his medical training and did graduate study in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, followed by residencies in Internal Medicine and Neurology, and basic neuroscience research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Earlier work in his lab was mostly directed at the level of receptors, particularly N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the function of single synapses. The emphasis has now largely shifted to studies of small networks (microcircuits) in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Dr Westbrook maintains interests in clinical neurology, particularly epilepsy, as well as graduate research training – he currently serves as the director of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vollum/OHSU.

    Expertise
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    clinical neurology
    synaptic transmission
    olfactory system
    hippocampus
    neuroscience
    brain microcircuits
    neurological diseases
  39. Patricia Wittkopp

    Patricia Wittkopp

    Senior Editor

    Patricia Wittkopp received a BS from the University of Michigan, a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and did postdoctoral work at Cornell University. In 2005, she began a faculty position at the University of Michigan, where she is now an Arthur F Thurnau Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and LSA Honors Program. Her research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution of gene expression. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work. She was a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Fellow, an Alfred P Sloan Research Fellow, and a recipient of a March of Dimes Starter Scholar Award.

    Expertise
    Computational and Systems Biology
    Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    Research focus
    evolutionary genetics
    evolution and development
    gene expression
    regulatory networks
    allele-specific expression
  40. Huda Zoghbi

    Huda Zoghbi

    Senior Editor

    Huda Zoghbi is Professor of Pediatrics, Neurology, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. She is also an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital. Her research focuses on understanding normal brain development and on elucidating the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including the autism spectrum disorder, Rett syndrome, and late-onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    Expertise
    Human Biology and Medicine
    Neuroscience
    Research focus
    animal models of human disease and behavioural sciences
    neurodegenerative disorders
    polyglutamine disorders
    autism
    synaptic disorders
    neurogenetics