eLife works to improve research communication through open science and open technology innovation

Latest research

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Medicine

    The half-life of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin is regulated through O-glycosylation in mice, but not in humans

    Omar Al Rifai et al.
    In mice, but not in humans, the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin is O-glycosylated, a post-translational modification controlling its half-life in vivo.
    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Ral GTPases promote breast cancer metastasis by controlling biogenesis and organ targeting of exosomes

    Shima Ghoroghi et al.
    A combination of animal models reveal how the molecular mechanisms of exosome secretion (RalA/B-dependent) are linked to their cargo content and their function in breast cancer pre-metastatic niche formation.
    1. Cell Biology

    Cross-compartment signal propagation in the mitotic exit network

    Xiaoxue Zhou et al.
    The mitotic exit network signals from spindle pole bodies to the nucleolus through the dynamic localization of its terminal kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1.
    1. Developmental Biology

    Runx2-Twist1 interaction coordinates cranial neural crest guidance of soft palate myogenesis

    Xia Han et al.
    Identification of heterogenous cranial neural crest (CNC)-derived cell populations and their roles in guiding craniofacial muscle development through cell-cell interactions.
    1. Developmental Biology

    Reciprocal interaction between mesenchymal stem cells and transit amplifying cells regulates tissue homeostasis

    Junjun Jing et al.
    The molecular regulatory mechanisms that control the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells and transit amplifying cells to maintain tissue homeostasis.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Universal and taxon-specific trends in protein sequences as a function of age

    Jennifer E James et al.
    Ancient protein domains remain shaped by amino acid availability during early life, while young animal proteins are shaped by a need for high intrinsic structural disorder.