eLife works to improve research communication through open science and open technology innovation

Latest research

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cancer Biology

    Elevated FBXO45 promotes liver tumorigenesis through enhancing IGF2BP1 ubiquitination and subsequent PLK1 upregulation

    Xiao-Tong Lin et al.
    Using IGF2BP1-PLK1 axis as an example, targeting oncogenic signaling represents a direction treatment for HCC patients with high FBXO45 expression.
    1. Neuroscience

    Maturation of persistent and hyperpolarization-activated inward currents shapes the differential activation of motoneuron subtypes during postnatal development

    Simon A Sharples, Gareth B Miles
    Electrophysiological recordings from mouse spinal motoneurons reveal key roles for ion channels in establishing the differential activation of motoneuron subtypes during postnatal development.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Type 1 polyisoprenoid diphosphate phosphatase modulates geranylgeranyl-mediated control of HMG CoA reductase and UBIAD1

    Rania Elsabrouty et al.
    Type 1 polyisoprenoid diphosphate phosphatase (PDP1) contributes to interconversion of isoprenols and isoprenylpyrophosphates, balancing the sterol and nonsterol branches of the mevalonate pathway by regulating ERAD of HMG CoA reductase and ER-to-Golgi transport of UBIAD1.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Neutrophil-mediated oxidative stress and albumin structural damage predict COVID-19-associated mortality

    Mohamed A Badawy et al.
    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy quantitatively correlates structural damages of serum albumin with COVID-19 severity and mortality thus suggesting albumin replacement therapy as a strategy to rescue patients at risk of mortality.
    1. Neuroscience

    Population receptive fields in nonhuman primates from whole-brain fMRI and large-scale neurophysiology in visual cortex

    P Christiaan Klink et al.
    Within-species comparison of population receptive fields determined with fMRI and electrophysiology in nonhuman primates reveals the neuronal basis of blood-oxygen-level-dependent-based retinotopy.