eLife is an open-access journal that publishes promising research in the life and biomedical sciences

Latest research

    1. Cell Biology
    2. Developmental Biology and Stem Cells

    Extensive alternative splicing transitions during postnatal skeletal muscle development are required for calcium handling functions

    Amy E Brinegar et al.
    Global transcriptome changes, particularly alternative splicing, are highly dynamic the first 2 weeks after birth, and the example of calcineurin A splicing exemplifies the importance of alternative splicing during skeletal muscle development.
    1. Cell Biology

    Allosteric control of an asymmetric transduction in a G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer

    Junke Liu et al.
    In mGlu heterodimers, an oriented asymmetrical activation revealed complex allosteric interaction between subunits.
    1. Plant Biology

    BLADE-ON-PETIOLE proteins act in an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex to regulate PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 abundance

    Bo Zhang et al.
    The abundance of the PIF4 transcription factor, central in light and temperature signaling, is controlled by an E3 ligase encoded by BOP proteins.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Neuroscience

    High-intensity training enhances executive function in children in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    David Moreau et al.
    Short bursts of high-intensity exercise elicit robust improvements in core cognitive abilities, especially in individuals whose genotype is associated with lower cognitive performance.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Regulation of life span by the gut microbiota in the short-lived African turquoise killifish

    Patrick Smith et al.
    Resetting a young gut microbiota in middle-aged individuals extends life span and slows aging in the naturally short-lived turquoise killifish, a new vertebrate model organism to study how the microbiota affects the aging process.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine

    Loss of the melanocortin-4 receptor in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy

    Michael J Litt et al.
    The melanocortin-4 receptor knockout mouse exhibits a cardiomyopathy syndrome, which raises concerns about cardiovascular function in patients with the similar loss of function mutations, and perhaps even in the 1 in 1500 patients with heterozygous loss of the gene.