Pain-free publishing for your best science.

Randy Schekman 2013 Nobel Laureate, Editor-in-Chief
"It’s no longer necessary to endure endless cycles of revision and requests for new experiments. eLife editors, who are all working scientists, commit to providing clear and constructive feedback quickly."

Supported by:

Logos of the 3 eLife funders: Max Planck Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Wellcome Trust

Why publish with us?

  • Speed
    Get your results out fast

    Initial decisions are made in a few days, post-review decisions in about a month, and most articles go through only one round of revision. Every author also has the option to make their accepted manuscript openly available shortly after receiving a final decision.

  • Great backing
    We support early career scientists

    To support job, tenure and funding applications, the eLife Senior editor who handles your paper is willing to write a letter of recommendation that describes the significance of your article.

  • Review process
    Taking the pain out of peer review

    The scientist editors who run eLife will give you feedback that’s constructive and fair. If invited to revise your work, you’ll receive a single consolidated list of comments, so that you know exactly what you need to do to get your work published.

  • Research assessment
    eLife will not promote the Impact Factor

    We’ll promote your work, and provide quantitative and qualitative indicators about its reach and influence. eLife is working to expand and enrich the concept of research impact beyond the use of a single number and a journal name.

  • Reach
    Get great exposure

    eLife papers get great media coverage in venues like the New York Times and National Geographic. We make every paper more accessible to a broad set of readers – including students, colleagues in other fields, and the public – through Impact statements, plain language summaries (eLife Digests), and selected expert commentaries (eLife Insights). eLife articles are immediately and freely available to the world – and there’s no cost to publish.

  • Community driven
    Scientists make the decisions

    eLife is a unique, non-profit, researcher-driven initiative. Editorial decisions are made exclusively by working scientists in your field.

  • Marianne Bronner Caltech
    "We had a great experience publishing in eLife and were particularly amazed at the great publicity the paper received. My post-docs are now convinced that this is a good place to publish so I’m confident that the next paper we consider sending to [a high profile journal] will go to eLife."
  • Bassem Hassan KU Leuven
    "The reviewer consultation process where the reviewers, the reviewing editor and the senior editor all work together is fantastic. What a unique and positive experience. eLife is a truly transformative journal."
  • Wolf B. Frommer Carnegie Institution for Science
    "I am very happy my paper was accepted by eLife, but I have to say that it was a wonderful experience all around. Constructive criticism, plus rapid decisions and no big fuss. Congratulations for setting this journal up ... you guys will take eLife to the top."

Aims & scope

eLife publishes outstanding research in the life sciences and biomedicine, from the most fundamental and theoretical work, through to translational, applied, and clinical research. Our 36 Senior editors and 294-member Board of Reviewing Editors are among the most respected and accomplished individuals in their fields – from human genetics and neuroscience to biophysics and epidemiology. Where necessary, our Senior editors will also consult with external guest editors to evaluate new submissions.

Leadership team

  • Randy Schekman

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Randy Schekman was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, with James Rothman and Thomas Sudhof. He is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His work concerns the mechanism of membrane assembly and vesicular traffic in eukaryotic cells. He and his laboratory discovered many of the genes and proteins required for secretion in yeast and they have applied this knowledge to understand human genetic diseases that affect core components of the secretory machinery. Among other awards, he shared the Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Lasker Award with James Rothman. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, he was elected President of the American Society for Cell Biology in 1999 and served as Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from 2006 to late 2011.

    Keywords

    Membrane assembly; vesicular trafficking; protein transport; animal and human cell biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Randy Schekman has received funding from the HHMI, the UC Berkeley Miller Foundation and from the Glenn Foundation. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Annual Reviews of Cell and Developmental Biology, Head of Faculty for Cell Biology for F1000, the Scientific Director of the Jane Coffin Childs Fund (ends 2012), and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Tamasek Life Science laboratory, Singapore (ends 2012). He was the Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (until 2011), and was an elected Council member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (until this year).

  • Eve Marder

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Eve Marder

    is the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience at Brandeis University. Marder is a Past President of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Marder is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of the Biophysical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Society of Neuroethology. She received the Miriam Salpeter Award from WIN, the WF Gerard Prize from the SfN, the Miller Prize from the Society for Cognitive Neuroscience, the Karl Spenser Lashley Prize from the American Philosophical Society, and the Gruber Prize in Neuroscience. Marder served on the NIH BRAIN Initiative working group. Marder studies the dynamics of small neuronal networks, and her work was instrumental in demonstrating that neuronal circuits are not "hard-wired" but are reconfigured by neuromodulators to produce a variety of outputs. She now studies the extent to which similar network performance can arise from different sets of network parameters.

    Keywords

    Neurobiology; central pattern generators; neuromodulation; homeostasis; circuit dynamics; neuronal excitability; computational models of neuronal dynamics

    Competing interests statement: 

    Eve Marder is employed by Brandeis University. She receives research and training funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Leir Foundation, and the Swartz Foundation. She serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of Janelia Farm. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association of Science, and a Fellow of the Biophysical Society. She presently serves on editorial boards of Current Biology, Current Opinion in Neurobiology, and Progress in Neurobiology.

     

  • Fiona Watt

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Fiona Watt is internationally recognised for elucidating the mechanisms that control epidermal stem cell renewal, differentiation and tissue assembly, and discovering how those processes are deregulated in disease. She obtained her DPhil from Oxford University and was a postdoc at MIT. She established her first laboratory at the Kennedy Institute in London and then moved to the Cancer Research UK (CR-UK) London Research Institute (formerly known as the Imperial Cancer Research Fund), where she worked for 20 years. From 2007 to 2012 she was the inaugural Herchel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Cambridge, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research and Deputy Director of the CR-UK Cambridge Research Institute. Since 2012 she has been Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King’s College London. Fiona Watt is a member of EMBO, a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society and an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; stem cell biology; biology cancer cell stem

    Competing interests statement: 

    Fiona Watt receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK and the European Commission. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Expert Review of Dermatology, Cell Stem Cell, StemBook, the Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, and EMBO Molecular Medicine. She is a member of the ‘Faculty of 1000’ online review service (section head, stem cells and regeneration). She is a member of the International Society for Stem Cell Research Board of Directors, a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Canadian Stem Cell Network, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, North East England Stem Cell Institute, Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) of Kyoto University, Fondazione Piemontese per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), Ontario-wide Stem Cell initiative and Centre for Commercialization in Regenerative Medicine, and the Institute of Bioengineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). She is a member of the Wellcome Trust Investigator Awards, expert review group, Cell and Developmental Biology, and a member of the Steering Committee for the UK Stem Cell Bank.

  • Detlef Weigel

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Detlef Weigel received his PhD in 1988 from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. After postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty of the Salk Institute in 1993. Since 2002, he has been director of the Department of Molecular Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. His current research interests focus on natural genetic variation and evolutionary genomics of plants. Examples of recent important projects are the 1001 Genomes project for Arabidopsis thaliana, and the systematic dissection of deleterious epistasis between Arabidopsis strains due to autoimmunity. Among the awards he has received are the Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Otto Bayer Award. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society.

    Keywords

    Natural variation; epigenetics; evolutionary genomics; plant biology; genomics; evolutionary biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Detlef Weigel has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the Foundation of the State of Baden-Württemberg, the German Ministry for Education and Research, the European Commission, the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization, and several US Federal agencies. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology and Genome Biology. He is Chair of EMBO Council, and is serving or has recently served on the Advisory Boards of the Epigenomics of Plants International Consortium, Bayer Crop Science, The Arabidopsis Information Resource, Flanders Institute of Biotechnology, Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, and the Sainsbury Laboratory. He is a co-founder of Computomics and CeMet.

Senior editors
  • Anna Akhmanova

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Anna Akhmanova is a Professor of Cell Biology at the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She studied biochemistry and molecular biology at the Moscow State University and obtained her PhD at the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Akhmanova studies cytoskeletal organization and trafficking processes, which contribute to cell polarization, differentiation, vertebrate development and human disease. The main focus of the work in her group is the microtubule cytoskeleton. Research in the group relies on combining high-resolution live cell imaging and quantitative analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics with in vitro reconstitution experiments. Her work has resulted in identification and characterization of a broad variety of factors which control microtubule organization and dynamics and motor attachment to membrane organelles. Anna Akhmanova is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

     

    Keywords

    Cytoskeletal dynamics; microtubule-binding proteins; microtubule-based motors; membrane transport

    Competing interests statement: 

    Anna Akhmanova receives funding from the European Research Council, Human Frontier Science Program, and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience. She served on the editorial boards of BMC Cell Biology and Journal of Biological Chemistry. She is a currently on the editorial boards of PLOS Biology, Journal of Cell Science, Traffic, and BioArchitecture.

  • Richard Aldrich

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Neuroscience

    Rick Aldrich is the Karl Folkers Chair II in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research and Professor of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin. He joined the faculty in 2006 and served as chair until 2011. Previously he was on the faculty of Neurobiology (1985-1990) and of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (1990-2006) at Stanford University where he served as department chair from 20012004. He was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1990 to 2006. His work is on molecular mechanisms of ion channels and calcium signaling proteins, with an emphasis on understanding gated conformational changes and allosteric mechanisms. Work in the laboratory is multidisciplinary including electrophysiology, biochemistry, spectroscopy, informatics and computation. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He is past president of the Biophysical Society and the Society of General Physiologists, and has received the Kenneth Cole Award for Membrane Physiology from the Biophysical Society and Alden Spencer Award for Neuroscience Research from Columbia University.

    Keywords

    Ion channels; calcium binding proteins; membrane transport; allostery and cooperativity; cellular neurophysiology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Richard Aldrich is employed by The University of Texas at Austin. He receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health.He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He serves actively on the editorial boards of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and The Journal of General Physiology.

  • Ian Baldwin

    Expertise: 
    • Ecology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Ian Baldwin studied biology and chemistry at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and graduated 1981 with an AB. In 1989, he received a PhD in Chemical Ecology from Cornell University, in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. He was an Assistant (1989), Associate (1993) and Full Professor (1996) in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. In 1996 he became the Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, where he now heads of the Department of Molecular Ecology. In 1999 he was appointed Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. In 2002 he founded the International Max Planck Research School at the Max Planck Institute in Jena. Baldwin's scientific work is devoted to understanding the traits that allow plants to survive in the real world. To achieve this, he has developed a molecular toolbox for the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) and a graduate program that trains “genome-enabled field biologists” to combine genomic and molecular genetic tools with field work to understand the genes that matter for plant-herbivore, -pollinator, -plant, -microbial interactions under real-world conditions. He has also been driver behind the open-access publication efforts of the Max Planck Society.

    Major subject area(s)

    Plant biology; evolution and ecology; secondary metabolism; organismic level gene function

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ian Baldwin has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the US National Science Foundation, the AW Mellon Foundation, the European Research Council, and the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization. He currently serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Integrated Plant Biology; and previously, Oecologia, Ecological Studies Series, Chemoecology, and The Plant Journal. He serves on the advisory boards of the Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Lytle Preserve, Brigham Young University, and more MPG programs than can be listed; and previously, the Institute of the Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Jülich, the Minerva Center for Arid Ecosystems Research, Hebrew University, the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, the Swiss NSF Priority Program "Plant Survival in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems”, and the DFG Priority Programs "Biological radiations" and "Trophic interactions and dynamics of communities".

  • Naama Barkai

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology

    Naama Barkai is a systems and computational biologist interested in how bio-molecular circuits are designed. She joined the Weizmann Institute in 1999, following a post-doc (Princeton) and graduate studies (Hebrew University) in physics. She is currently chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics, and the head of the Azrieli and Kahan Centers for Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute. In 2013, Barkai was elected to a Vallee Foundation Visiting Professorship and awarded the Abisch Frankel prize.

    Keywords

    Systems biology; modeling; functional genomics; yeast genetics; morphogen gradients

    Competing interests statement: 

    Naama Barkai's main funding sources are from the European Research Council (ERC), the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), the Israel Science Foundation (ISF), Minerva, and the Bi-national Science Foundation (BSF). Barkai also serves on the editorial board of Development.

  • Timothy Behrens

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Tim Behrens is Professor of Computational Neuroscience at Oxford University and University College London, and a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow. His work investigating the neural mechanisms that control behaviour has made an impact across scales from cells to brain regions across mammalian species. He has also developed widely used approaches for measuring brain connections non-invasively that have been taken up by the Human Connectome Project, where he is a senior investigator and chair of the anatomical connectivity team.

    Keywords

    Cognition; behavioural neuroscience; learning and decision making; brain imaging; brain connectivity; computational neuroscience; neural coding 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tim Behrens receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, the James S McDonnell Foundation, the National Institute of Health, and the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. He is on the editorial board of PLOS Biology.

  • Marianne E Bronner

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Marianne Bronner is a developmental biologist with a long-standing interest in specification, migration and differentiation of neural crest stem cells. Using a pan-vertebrate approach, her lab has been systematically studying the gene regulatory network responsible for neural crest formation and evolutionary origin. Born in Budapest, Hungary, Marianne’s family escaped to Austria during the Hungarian revolution when she was a small child.  She received her ScB in Biophysics from Brown University and then a PhD in Biophysics from Johns Hopkins University. She assumed her first faculty position at the University of California, Irvine, before moving to Caltech in 1996.  Marianne received the Conklin Medal from The Society for Developmental Biology in 2013, the Women in Cell Biology Senior Award from the American Society for Cell Biology in 2012, as well as several teaching awards from her institution.  She was elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2015.

     

    Keywords
    Vertebrate development biology; cell lineage; cell migration; vertebrate evolution

    Competing interests statement: 

    Marianne Bronner is employed by the California Institute of Technology and receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health. She is on the board of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and member of several other societies (e.g., Society for Developmental Biology, the American Society for Cell Biology, Society for Neuroscience, International Society for Differentiation). In addition to being a Senior Editor for eLife, she is Editor-in-Chief of Developmental Biology and serves actively as monitoring editor of Journal of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology of the Cell, PLOS Biology and PNAS.  She is presently on the boards of the Sontag Foundation and Curci Foundation as well as the Conference Evaluation Committee of the Gordon Research Conferences.

  • Arup K Chakraborty

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Immunology

    Arup Chakraborty is the Robert T Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at MIT. He is the founding Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He is also a founding steering committee member of the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. Chakraborty was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley from December 1988 to September 2005, after which he moved to MIT. The central theme of his research since 2000 is the development and application of theoretical/computational approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, to aid the quest for mechanistic principles in immunology, and then harness this understanding to aid the design of vaccines against mutable pathogens (e.g., HIV). A characteristic of his work is the impact of his studies on experimental immunology and clinical studies (he collaborates extensively with immunologists). Arup’s work at the interface of the physical and life sciences has been recognized by honors that include an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the EO Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Arup is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Keywords
    Computational biology; immunology; statistical mechanics; signaling; virology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Arup Chakraborty is funded by the NIH and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard.

  • Jonathan A Cooper

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Jon Cooper is a member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he is also a Senior Vice-President and Director of the Division of Basic Sciences. He holds an Affiliate Professor appointment in the Biochemistry department at the University of Washington. After undergraduate studies at the University of Cambridge and post-graduate research at the University of Warwick, he performed postdoctoral research with Bernard Moss at the NIH and with Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute. With Tony, he found that oncogenic retroviruses (Rous sarcoma virus and others) and growth factors (EGF and PDGF) stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of overlapping subsets of cell proteins, which were candidates to regulate cell proliferation and metabolism. He joined Fred Hutch in 1985 to continue the work he started at the Salk, investigating the mechanisms by which protein kinases regulate cell proliferation and transformation. His laboratory played important roles in establishing how Src is regulated, how activated growth factor receptors recruit signaling proteins, and Ras-Raf-MAPK signaling. In 1995, postdoc Brian Howell knocked out the gene for a Src substrate and observed a distinctive brain development phenotype. Efforts by several laboratories rapidly established a signaling pathway that regulates neuron migrations during brain development. Further studies on this pathway revealed the importance of ubiquitination and degradation for terminating signaling, and led in recent years to detailed investigation of the roles of Cullin-RING ligases in regulating signal transduction events in vivo and in cultured cells.

     

    Keywords

    Signaling pathways; cell migration; phosphorylation; cell transformation

    Competing interests statement: 

    Jon Cooper receives research grants from the NIH and he serves on the editorial board of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

  • Harry Dietz

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine

    Dr Dietz is Victor A McKusick Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Molecular Biology & Genetics in the Institute of Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    His undergraduate training in biomedical engineering was performed at Duke University and his MD degree was received from the Health Sciences University of Syracuse.  Clinical and research training in pediatrics, pediatric cardiology, and genetics occurred at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 

    Dr Dietz’s research is focused on elucidation of the etiology and pathogenesis of connective tissue disorders that involve the cardiovascular system.  

    Dr Dietz has received multiple prestigious awards including the Curt Stern Award from the American Society of Human Genetics, the Taubman Prize for excellence in translational medical science, and the Harrington Prize from the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Harrington Discovery Institute. He is an inductee of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academy of American Physicians, The National Academy of Medicine, Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Sciences.

    Keywords

    Human genetics; extracellular matrix; connective tissue disorders; genetics of cardiovascular disease

    Competing interests statement: 

    Hal Dietz receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Heath, Leducq Foundation, Marfan Foundation, and Scleroderma Research Foundation.  He currently serves on the editorial board of Science Translation Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He serves on the advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline, is founder and consultant for Blade Therapeutics, and also consults for Eli Lilly and Bristol-Myers Squibb. He is President Elect of the American Society of Human Genetics.

  • Ivan Dikic

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Cell biology

    Ivan Dikic is a Professor and Chairman of Institute of Biochemistry II at the Medical School Goethe University and a member of the Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences in Frankfurt. He was trained as a medical doctor at Zagreb University and obtained his PhD in molecular biology with Joseph Schlessinger. His career is focused on studying intracellular signaling initially via protein tyrosine kinases where he revealed how multiple monoubiquitination controls EGFR endocytosis. His lab has pioneered a concept of Ubiquitin as a multivalent cellular signal that regulates multitude of physiological and pathophysiological processes including DNA repair, inflammation, cancer, infection and proteasomal degradation. Ivan’s group also provided structural and functional evidence for a new type of Ub chains that are Met1-linked (called linear ubiquitination) in promoting the NF-kB signaling. His current interests focus on selective autophagy, which is essential for the clearance of protein aggregates, pathogens, and damaged mitochondria from the cell.

    He has received many awards for his work including the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research, the Award of European Association for Cancer Research, the Hans Krebs Prize, the Leibniz Award and the Ernst Jung Award in Medicine. He is a Member of the German Academy for Sciences Leopoldina, Academia Europaea, Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization.


    Keywords

    Ubiquitination; autophagy; endocytosis; inflammation; cancer biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ivan Dikic receives funding from the Deutsche Forshungsemeinschaft and European Union, and serves as a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center of Protein Research Copenhagen, MRC Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination Unit Dundee, DKFZ-ZMBH Allianz. He is a chairman of the EMBO Publication Committee and is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, Developmental Cell, EMBO JournalEMBO Reports, BMC Biology, Biochemical Journal, and Cell Death and Differentiation.

  • Catherine Dulac

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Catherine Dulac is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences at Harvard University. Her work explores the molecular biology of pheromone detection and signaling in mammals, and the neural mechanisms underlying age-, species-, and sex-specific behaviors. She graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris; received her PhD from the University of Paris VI at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Embryology (Nogent-sur-Marne); and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and a member of the French Academy of Sciences, Institute of France. She is a recipient of the Liliane Bettencourt Prize, the Richard Lounsbery Award, the Perl/UNC Neuroscience Prize and the IPSEN Foundation Neuronal Plasticity prize.

    Keywords

    Cellular and molecular neuroscience; molecular and genetic basis of sex and species-specific social behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    Catherine Dulac receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. She is a member of the editorial boards of Current Opinion in Neurobiology and The Journal of Comparative Neurology. She is a member of selection committees for the following awards and prizes: McKnight Foundation Technical Innovation Award, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship Program, The Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, the New York Stem Cell Foundation Innovator Awards in Neuroscience, the Smith Family Awards Program for Excellence in Biomedical Research and the Searle Scholars. She also serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards for the following organizations: Senomyx, Allen Institute, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research. She is a member of the Visiting Committee for MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and she serves as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health Somatosensory and Chemosensory Study Section.

     

  • Wendy S Garrett

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wendy Garrett is the Melvin J and Geraldine L. Glimcher Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute. Her work explores host-microbiota interactions underlying mucosal immune homeostasis, gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders, and cancer. She graduated from the Yale College; received her MD PhD from Yale University and completed post-graduate training at Harvard.

    Keywords
    Host–microbiota interactions; microbiome; mucosal immunology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wendy Garrett receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, Hoffman-LaRoche, and Groupe Danone. She is a member of the Cell Reports and Journal of Clinical Microbiology editorial boards. She consults for Janssen and serves on the scientific advisory boards of Synlogic and Evelo Biosciences.

  • Christian S Hardtke

    Expertise: 
    • Plant biology

    Christian Hardtke obtained a PhD in Developmental Biology from the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich in 1997 for his work on plant embryogenesis. He then moved to Yale University as an HFSP postdoctoral fellow to study photomorphogenesis, before joining McGill University as Assistant Professor in 2001. He was appointed Associate Professor at the University of Lausanne in 2004, where he became Full Professor and director of the Department of Plant Molecular Biology in 2010. His research revolves around the molecular genetic control of plant development, with a focus on quantitative aspects of plant growth and morphology. He is particularly interested in mechanisms of vascular tissue differentiation and their relation to root system architecture, as well as the intersection of these mechanisms with natural genetic variation. 

    Keywords
    Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, natural variation, developmental cell biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Christian Hardtke has received funding from the Human Frontier Science Program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, various EU research programs and the Swiss National Science Foundation. He is currently an editor of Plant and Cell Physiology and also serves on the editorial board of EMBO Reports.

  • Tony Hunter

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Cell biology

    Tony Hunteris the Renato Dulbecco Chair in Cancer Research, Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center and an American Cancer Society Professor in the Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. In 1979, through his work on tumor viruses, he discovered a new class of protein kinase that phosphorylate tyrosine. He has spent most of the last 35 years studying protein kinases and phosphatases, and the role of protein phosphorylation in cell proliferation and the cell cycle, and how aberrant protein phosphorylation can cause cancer. His group also works on other types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including ubiquitylation and sumoylation, and crosstalk between PTMs. He has received many awards for his work on tyrosine phosphorylation, including a Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Wolf Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Philosophical Society.

    Keywords
    Signaling pathways in animal and human cells; cell cycle; phosphorylation; protein modification; cancer

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tony Hunter receives funding from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and serves as Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center funded by an NCI Cancer Center Support Grant. He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Cancer Center, the Van Andel Research Institute, and the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology. He is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, the Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesEMBO Journal, and EMBO Reports.

     

  • Prabhat Jha

    Expertise: 
    • Epidemiology & global health
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Prabhat Jha has been a key figure in epidemiology and economics of global health for the past decade. He is the University of Toronto Endowed Professor in Disease Control and Canada Research Chair at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the founding Director of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Professor Jha is a lead investigator of the Million Death Study in India, which quantifies the causes of premature mortality in over one million homes from 19972014 and which examines the contribution of key risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, diet, and environmental exposures. He is co-investigator of the Disease Control Priorities Network and the author of several influential books on tobacco control, including two that helped enable a global treaty on tobacco control, now signed by over 160 countries. Prior to founding CGHR, Professor Jha served as Senior Scientist for the World Health Organization, where he co-led the work on health and poverty for the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health. Earlier, he headed the World Bank team responsible for developing the Second National HIV/AIDS Control Program in India. His advisory work has included the Government of South Africa on its national health insurance plan, and the United States Institute of Medicine on global health. Notable recognitions include the Order of Canada (2013) for contributions to global health, the  Luther Terry Award for Research on Tobacco Control (2012), The Globe and Mail 25 Transformational Canadians (2010), Top 40 Canadians under Age 40 Award (2004), the Ontario Premier’s Research Excellence Award (2004), and Gold Medal from the Poland Health Promotion Foundation (2000). Professor Jha holds an MD from the University of Manitoba and a DPhil from Oxford University, where he studied as a Canadian Rhodes Scholar.

    Keywords

    Epidemiology; global health; infectious disease and population dynamics; randomized controlled trials

    Competing interests statement: 

    Prabhat Jha has received funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Canadian International Development Research Agency, Canadian International Development Agency, the International Science and Technology Program of the Canadian government, and the US National Institutes of Health. He serves on the editorial board of Demography India. He advises several agencies and the Canadian government on epidemiology, disease control strategies, and tobacco control, and serves on the advisory board of the UK Biobank.

  • Sabine Kastner

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Sabine Kastner is Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology at Princeton University. Kastner studies the neural basis of visual perception, attention, and awareness in the primate brain using a combination of electrophysiology and neuroimaging methods. She has made numerous contributions particularly to the functional organization of the human attention network, the parcellation of the human parietal cortex, the role of the thalamus in perception and cognition, and the topographic and functional organization of the human visual system. Kastner has served as Reviewing and Senior Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience and currently serves as the Specialty Chief Editor for ‘Frontiers for young minds’ - Understanding neuroscience, the first open-access journal for children 8-14 that educates about neuroscience research.

    Keywords
    Cognitive and systems neuroscience; neuroimaging and intracranial electrophysiology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sabine Kastner receives funding for her research from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the James S McDonnell Foundation. She serves on the editorial boards of Neuron, F1000, and Neuropsychologia.

  • Andrew J King

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Andrew King is Professor of Neurophysiology and a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, where he heads the Auditory Neuroscience Group in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. His research uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the neural basis for auditory perception and multisensory integration. His group is currently investigating the representation and coding of sound features by populations of neurons, how neural responses adjust to changes in the statistical distribution of sounds associated with different acoustic environments, and the capacity of the brain to compensate for the changes in inputs that result from hearing loss. He was awarded the Wellcome Prize in Physiology in 1990 and was made a Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011.

     

    Keywords

    Auditory system; auditory perception; multisensory integration

    Competing interests statement: 

    Andrew King receives funding for his research from the Wellcome Trust, the University of Oxford, and from Action on Hearing Loss. He serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Physiology and Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. He is a member of the Sir Henry Dale Fellowship Interview Committee, Action on Hearing Loss PhD Review Panel, Auditory Verbal UK Advisory Board, and the Agir Pour L’Audition Scientific Prize Committee.

  • John Kuriyan

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology

    John Kuriyan is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and also of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Before this, he was on the faculty at The Rockefeller University, New York, where he began his career in 1987, leaving for Berkeley in 2001. Since 1990, he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Kuriyan completed undergraduate studies in chemistry at Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA. His doctoral research, on the dynamics of proteins, was carried out at MIT, under the guidance of Greg Petsko and Martin Karplus (Harvard University). Kuriyan’s research is aimed at understanding the structure and mechanism of the enzymes and molecular switches that carry out cellular signal transduction and DNA replication. His laboratory uses x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins involved in signaling and replication, as well as biochemical, biophysical, and computational analyses to elucidate mechanisms. Kuriyan was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2001.

    Keywords

    Biochemistry and biophysics; structural biology of cell signaling and DNA replication

    Competing interests statement: 

    John Kuriyan has received funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the US National Institutes of Health, and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. He serves on the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and on the Scientific Advisory Boards of Carmot Therapeutics (San Francisco) and Jubilant Biosys (Bangalore). He is a founder of Nurix (San Francisco).

     

  • Wenhui Li

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wenhui Li is an Investigator of the National Institute of Biological Sciences (NIBS), Beijing, China. He received a bachelor’s degree in medicine from the Medical School of Lanzhou University in 1994 and his PhD from the Peking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in 2001. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School, Li joined NIBS as an Assistant Investigator in 2007 and rose to the rank of Investigator in 2015. His team at NIBS identified a liver bile acids transporter (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide, NTCP) as a functional receptor for Hepatitis B and D virus. Li’s research interest has been focusing on the molecular mechanisms of viral infections: currently his laboratory combines virology, biochemistry, immunology, and chemical biology to investigate molecular mechanisms of HBV/HDV infection.

    Keywords

    Virus infection; hepatitis B/D virus; receptor; antivirals

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wenhui Li receives funding from the Ministry of Science and Technology, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the Science and Technology Bureau of Beijing Municipal Government. He serves as a member of the editorial boards of Chin J Virol (2011–), Virologica Sinica (2013–), and J Biol Chem (2016–).

  • Richard Losick

    Expertise: 
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Richard Losick is the Maria Moors Cabot Professor of Biology, a Harvard College Professor, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences at Harvard University. He received his A.B. in Chemistry at Princeton University and a Ph.D. from MIT. He was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows. He is a past Chairman of the Departments of Cellular and Developmental Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Member of the American Philosophical Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. He is a recipient of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Selman A Waksman Award of the NAS, the Canada Gairdner Award, and the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize for Biology or Biochemistry of Columbia University.

    Keywords

    Microbiology; bacteria; fungi; protozoans

    Competing interests statement: 

    Richard Losick receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the scientific advisory boards for the Jane Coffin Childs Fund, the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis & HIV (K-RITH), and TenNor Therapeutics Limited. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.

  • Vivek Malhotra

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Vivek Malhotra was a professor in the biology division at UC San Diego until 2007 and is now the ICREA Professor and Chair of the Cell and Developmental Biology at Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona. His research focuses on a central station of the secretory pathway, the Golgi complex. Specifically, his work has resulted in the identification of the machinery required for the sorting and packaging of secretory cargoes. His recent work has uncovered a novel secretory routing that bypasses the conventional pathway of protein secretion. He received his BSc from Stirling University and was a Pirie–Reid scholar at Oxford; a Damon Runyon Walter Winchell and an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at Stanford; and Basil O’Conner scholar, established Investigator of the American Heart Association, and Senior Investigator of Sandler’s Foundation for Asthma at UC San Diego. He received the MERCK award from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is a fellow of the American association of the arts and science, and is an elected EMBO member.

    Keywords

    Golgi; membranes; protein secretions; cell compartmentation; organelle biogenesis and division

    Competing interests statement: 

    Vivek Malhotra receives funding from ERC/European Research Council, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, AGAUR and the Plan Nacional (Spain) He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of TIGEM (Naples, Italy), CNR (Naples, Italy), CBMSO (Madrid, Spain) and Department of Biotechnology (India). He has served on the editorial board of Cell and was an associate editor of Molecular Biology of the Cell. He is currently on the editorial boards of Journal of Cell Biology and Current Opinion in Cell Biology.

  • James Manley

    Expertise: 
    • Genes & chromosomes

    James Manley received a BS from Columbia University, a PhD from Stony Brook/Cold Spring Harbor Labs, and did postdoctoral work at MIT. He has been in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University since 1980, was Chair from 1995–2001, and Julian Clarence Levi Professor of Life Sciences since 1995. His research interests center on understanding the mechanisms and regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, especially with regard to mRNA splicing and 3’ end formation; how these processes are linked to transcription, cell signaling pathways, and maintenance of genomic stability; and how they contribute to cell differentiation and disease. He has authored or coauthored nearly 300 research articles and reviews on these topics, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. Dr. Manley is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Keywords

    Transcription; RNA processing; translation; RNA localization and turnover

    Competing interests statement: 

    Jim Manley receives research support from the National Institutes of Health and Columbia’s Motor Neuron Center. He is currently an Associate Editor of Gene Expression and Editor of Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is also on the editorial boards of Genes and Development, RNA, Molecular Cell, BMC Molecular Biology, BMC Biology, Recent Patents on DNA & Gene Sequences, and Transcription.

     

  • Michael Marletta

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry

    Michael Marletta is the Aldo DeBenedictis Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Previous to his appointment at UC Berkeley, he was a former President and CEO of The Scripps Research Institute. He has also been on the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he was an HHMI Investigator, and MIT. Marletta obtained an A.B. in chemistry and biology from the State University of New York at Fredonia, a Ph.D. from UCSF under George Kenyon and, after a postdoctoral appointment at MIT under Chris Walsh, began his independent career. His work has spanned protein chemistry and enzymology. He has made many contributions to our understanding of nitric oxide signaling and more generally in molecular mechanisms of gas sensing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. More recent studies have involved novel enzymes involved with cellulose degradation. Marletta is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Keywords

    Chemical biology; nitric oxide signaling; gas sensing; structural basis of enzyme activity

    Competing interests statement: 

    Michael Marletta has received funding from the NIH, HHMI, and Burroughs-Wellcome Fund. He was a member of the PNAS Editorial Board (until July 2012) and Biochemistry. He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of Lycera, Inc., Galleon Pharmaceuticals, Viamet Pharmaceuticals, and N30. He serves on the Scientific Review Board of HHMI. He is an External Review Board member of the Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Georgia Tech School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Chair, Natural Science Advisory Council, SUNY Fredonia. He is a co-founder of Omniox, Inc.

  • Mark McCarthy

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Mark McCarthy is the Robert Turner Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Oxford, based at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. He is also a Consultant Physician at the Oxford University Hospitals Trust and is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Geneva. Following medical training in Cambridge and London, a spell as an MRC Travelling Fellow at the Whitehead Institute in Massachusetts, and 8 years at Imperial College, he moved to Oxford in 2002. He is a physician-scientist and human geneticist interested in the biological basis of complex disease. His research group is focused on the identification and characterisation of genetic variants influencing risk of type 2 diabetes and related traits, and on using those discoveries to drive biological inference and translational opportunities. He works closely with colleagues in Oxford and beyond to establish the mechanisms whereby T2D-risk variants influence islet function, and to explore the value of this information to drive clinical advances. He has played a major role in establishing and leading a number of the global initiatives in this field including the DIAGRAM, MAGIC, GIANT, EGG, GoT2D, ENGAGE, and T2D-GENES consortia. He has been a Senior Editor at eLife since 2015.

    Keywords

    Human genetics and genomics; multifactorial disease; metabolic disease; biomarkers

    Competing interests statement: 

    Mark McCarthy has received funding from the UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Diabetes UK, British Heart Foundation, the (UK) National Institute for Health Research, the (US) National Institutes of Health, the European Commission, the Foundation of the NIH, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and from the Innovative Medicines Initiative. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards (or equivalent advisory committees) for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (Human Genetics), the H3A Bionet, and Genome Quebec. He is a member of the MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board and Cross Board Cohort Advisory Group. He has, via the IMI, received research funding, and/or has research collaborations with multiple pharma companies including Pfizer, Lilly, Sanofi-Aventis, NovoNordisk, and Boehringer Ingelheim.

  • Sean Morrison

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Human biology & medicine

    The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. Dr Morrison obtained his BSc in biology and chemistry from Dalhousie University (1991), then completed a PhD in immunology at Stanford University (1996), and a postdoctoral fellowship in neurobiology at Caltech (1999). From 1999 to 2011, Dr Morrison was at the University of Michigan where he Directed their Center for Stem Cell Biology. Recently, Dr Morrison moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he is the founding Director of the new Children’s Research Institute. Dr Morrison’s laboratory studies the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, as well as the role these mechanisms play in cancer. Dr Morrison was a Searle Scholar (2000–2003), was named in Technology Review Magazine’s list of 100 young innovators (2002), received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2003), the International Society for Hematology and Stem Cell’s McCulloch and Till Award (2007), the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award (2008), and a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Morrison has also been active in public policy issues surrounding stem cells. For example, he has twice testified before Congress and was a leader in the successful “Proposal 2” campaign to protect stem cell research in Michigan’s state constitution.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; tissue stem cells; hematopoietic system

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sean Morrison receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. In addition to being a Senior editor for eLife, he is a member of the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell, the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the EMBO Journal, the Faculty of 1000, Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Cancer Cell, EMBO Reports, and Stem Cell Reports. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the University of Washington Institute for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, the University of California, Los Angeles Broad Stem Cell Research Center, and the Common Fund for the National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine. He is President-Elect of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. He is a co-founder and shareholder in OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, a consultant and shareholder in G1 Therapeutics, a shareholder in Fate Therapeutics, and a consultant for Molecular Devices.

  • Michel Nussenzweig

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology

    Michel C Nussenzweig is the Zanvil A Cohn and Ralph Steinman Professor of Molecular Immunology and a Senior Physician at the Rockefeller University Hospital. Since 1990 he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr Nussenzweig obtained his PhD working with Dr Ralph Steinman on the role of Dendritic Cells in initiating immunity. He received his MD degree from New York University Medical School and trained in Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Massachusetts General Hospital. As a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr Philip Leder in the Deparment of Genetics at Harvard Medical School he became interested in the development of antibody producing B lymphocytes. Dr Nussenzweig’s current research is focused on understanding the development of humoral immune responses. His laboratory uses molecular biology, mouse genetics, and perfoms experimental medicine studies in human volunteers to elucidate basic principles in immunology and medicine. Dr Nussenzweig was elected to the US National Academy of Medicine in 2009 and the US National Academy of Sciences in 2011.

    Keywords
    Adaptive immunity; innate immunity; HIV; dendritic cells

    Competing interests statement: 

    Michel Nussenzweig has received funding from the Howard Hughes Insititute, the US National Institutes of Health, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Roberston Fund at Rockefeller University. He is an editor of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, and the Journal of Immunological Methods. He is on the scientific advisory board of Celldex Therapeutics.

  • Aviv Regev

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Aviv Regev is a computational biologist who joined the Broad Institute as a core member and MIT as a faculty member in 2006. Her work investigates how complex molecular networks function and evolve in the face of genetic and environmental changes, over time-scales ranging from minutes to millions of years. Regev received her MSc from Tel Aviv University, studying biology, computer science, and mathematics in the Interdisciplinary Program for the Fostering of Excellence, where she undertook research in both theoretical and experimental biology. She received her PhD in computational biology from Tel Aviv University. Prior to joining the Broad Institute, Regev was a fellow at the Bauer Center for Genomics Research at Harvard University, where she developed new approaches to the reconstruction of regulatory networks and modules from genomic data. Regev is also an associate professor in the Department of Biology at MIT
and director of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad. Regev is the Director of the Cell Circuits Program at the Broad and a lead principal investigator for the Center for Cell Circuits at the Broad Institute, a Center of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS). Regev has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist since 2009, and was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in 2013. She is a recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, a Sloan fellowship from the Sloan Foundation, the Overton Prize from the International Society for Computational Biology, and the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).

    (Image Credit: Maria Nemchuk)

    Keywords

    Computational biology; single cell genomics; systems biology; regulatory networks; systems immunology; gene regulation; evolution

    Competing interests statement: 

    Aviv Regev receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Sloan Foundation. She is on the external advisory board of the San Diego Center for Systems Biology, the FAS Center for Systems Biology at Harvard, the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing, the Jackson Laboratory, the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL), the SciLife Lab in Sweden, and ThermoFisher Scientific. She is on the advisory editorial board of Molecular Systems Biology and is an editorial board member of Genome Biology and Development. Regev is a consultant for Syros Phramaceuticals, GenePeeks, and CTIG (Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Group). Regev also worked for several years in the biotech industry in Israel, where she established and directed a bioinformatics research and development team at QBI, a functional genomics company.

     

  • Charles Sawyers

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Charles Sawyers is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His studies of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase function in chronic myeloid leukemia, in collaboration with Brian Druker and Novartis, led to the development of the kinase inhibitor imatinib as primary therapy for CML. This was followed by his discovery that BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations confer imatinib resistance, and development of the second generation Abl kinase inhibitor dasatinib, in collaboration with Bristol Myers Squibb. Sawyers' current work in prostate cancer resulted in the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (MDV3100), discovered in collaboration with University of California, Los Angeles chemist Michael Jung, which received FDA approval in 2012. Sawyers is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and co-recipient of the 2009 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.

    Keywords
    Oncology; translational medicine

    Competing interests statement: 

    Charles Sawyers receives research funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. He is President Elect of the American Association of Cancer Research and will serve as President from 201314. He is a Councilor of the American Association of Physicians (until 2017) and serves on the editorial boards of Cell and Cancer Cell, and as a scientific advisor to Agios, Aragon, Aveo, Housey Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Nextech, Pfizer, and Tracon.

     

  • Kevin Struhl

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Kevin Struhl received a BS and MS from MIT, a PhD from Stanford University Medical School, and did postdoctoral work at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. He has been in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School since 1982, was acting Chair from 1997–98, and has been the David Wesley Gaiser Professor since 1991. His research combines genetic, molecular, genomic, and evolutionary approaches to address a wide variety of fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structure in yeast. In addition, he is interested in elucidating transcriptional regulatory circuits that mediate the process of cellular transformation and the formation of cancer stem cells. He has authored or co-authored nearly 300 research articles and reviews, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He received the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and is a Distinguished Researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in Crete. Dr. Struhl is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Medicine.

    Keywords

    Transcription mechanisms; gene regulation; chromatin; mRNA decay; biological function; cellular transformation; cancer stem cells

  • Tadatsugu Taniguchi

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology

    Tada Taniguchi is currently Professor of the Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Industrial Science of The University of Tokyo and Director of the Max Planck–The University of Tokyo Center for Integrative Inflammology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Zurich under the supervision of Charles Weissmann. His work principally concerns the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene expression that underlie immunity and oncogenesis. Many of his research projects have stemmed from his original identification of two cytokine genes, interferon-beta and interleukin-2. These discoveries have laid the groundwork for the molecular characterization of the various systems of cytokines as well as therapeutic advances achieved by the administration of cytokines. One extension of this research was his discovery of a new family of transcription factors, the interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), which he and others have since identified as playing integral roles in the regulation of the immune system and cancer. He has received numerous awards, including the Robert Koch Prize, Pezcoller-AACR International Award for Cancer Research, and was bestowed the Person of Cultural Merit award from the Government of Japan. He was also elected Foreign Associate Member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, in 2003.

    Keywords

    Innate immunity; adaptive immunity; immunological disease; anti-tumor immunity; gene regulation in immune cells; signaling in immune cells; visualisation of immune responses 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tada Taniguchi has received funding from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology in Japan. He is a member of the editorial boards of Annual Review of Immunology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Immunity. He is a member of the board of directors of the Japan Molecular Biology Society, and served as member of the Science Council of Japan between 2005 and 2011. He also served as co-chairperson of the International Affairs Committee of The American Association for Cancer Research between 2002 and 2008.

     

  • Jessica Tyler

    Expertise: 
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Jessica Tyler was born in England in 1969. After graduating from the University of Sheffield with a Bachelors degree and the Hans Krebs Prize in Biochemistry, she performed her PhD studies at the MRC Virology Unit in Glasgow, Scotland. During her postdoctoral studies with Dr James Kadonaga at the University of California, San Diego, she identified the key chromatin assembly factors Anti-silencing Function 1 (Asf1) and characterized Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) from Drosophila. In 2000, Dr Tyler started her first faculty position in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, USA. In the next 10 years, Dr Tyler revealed that chromatin assembly and disassembly not only regulates S phase events, but also gene expression and the DNA damage response. Dr Tyler was a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar and was awarded the Charlotte Friend Woman in Cancer Research Award for 2009 from the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR). Having risen rapidly to the rank of full professor at the University of Colorado, Dr Tyler moved in 2010 to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Her recent work has extended to the broader influence of chromatin assembly on mitosis, aging and cancer. She is now in the Department of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis, where she co-directs the Center for Cancer Epigenetics and holds the Edward Rotan Distinguished Professorship in Cancer Research. Her most proud achievement is being mother to 11 year-old triplets. In November 2015, she became a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York.


    Keywords

    Epigenetic regulation; chromatin; gene expression; mitosis; aging; cancer

  • David Van Essen

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    David Van Essen is Alumni Endowed Professor of Neurobiology at Washington University in St Louis. He is internationally known for his research on the structure, function, connectivity, and development of cerebral cortex in humans and nonhuman primates. He is a pioneer in neuroinformatics and data sharing efforts in neuroscience. He was Chair of the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology (1992–2012) and was previously on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (1976–1992). He has served as President of the Society for Neuroscience, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience, founding chair of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, and president of the Association of Medical School Neuroscience Department Chairs. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received the Krieg Cortical Discoverer Award from the Cajal Club, the Peter Raven Lifetime Achievement Award from the St Louis Academy of Science, and the Second Century Award from the Washington University School of Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator for the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project, a large-scale effort to characterize brain connectivity and its relation to behavior in a large population of healthy young adults.

    Keywords

    Cerebral cortex; neuroanatomy; neuroimaging; systems neurophysiology; vision; non-human primates

    Competing interests statement: 

    David Van Essen is employed by Washington University in St Louis. He receives funding from the National Institutes of Health. He serves on the advisory board of the Allen Institute for Brain Science and the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Institute of Mental Health. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is on the editorial boards of Brain Connectivity, Journal of Comparative Neurology, and Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

  • K VijayRaghavan

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Genes & chromosomes
    • Neuroscience

    Vijay’s research aims to understand motor- and olfactory- circuit assembly: from deciphering how each component is made, interacts, and stabilises into functioning in the animal to allow behaviour in the real world. Related to the development of network function is its maintenance in the mature animal; another aspect of the work in the laboratory addresses how mature neurons and muscles are maintained. The laboratory uses a genetic approach, mainly using the fruit fly but also collaborating with those using mouse and cell-culture. VijayRaghavan is Secretary to the Government of India in the Ministry of Science and Technology in the Department of Biotechnology. He temporarily holds additional charge of the Department of Biotechnology. VijayRaghavan’s research continues at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Bangalore, India, where he is Distinguished Professor. He studied engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. His doctoral work was at TIFR, Mumbai and postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology. VijayRaghavan is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Foreign Associate of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Keywords

    Developmental biology; neurogenetics; neurobiology; genetic basis of behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    K VijayRaghavan currently receives research support from the Indo–French research agency CEFIPRA, and core support from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). Previous support was from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the Indian Department of Science and Technology (DST), Department of Biotechnology (DBT), CEFIPRA, the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). VijayRaghavan serves on the Board of Governors of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Janelia Farm Research Campus of the HHMI, Chair of the Research Council of the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, and Member of the Governing Council of the National Institute of Immunology. He is Associate Editor of BMC Developmental Biology, and a member of the editorial boards of Development, Seminars in Developmental Biology, and Bioconcepts. He is Chair of the Board of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-CAMP), a not-for-profit company of the National Centre for Biological Sciences and the stem cell institute, inStem, created to manage platform technologies and for technology transfer on the NCBS–inStem campus. He is a member of the board of the Madhuram Narayanan Centre for Exceptional Children, a not-for-profit school for disabled children in Chennai, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Human Frontier Science Program.

     

     

  • Gary Westbrook

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine
    • Neuroscience

    Gary Westbrook is a Senior Scientist and Co-Director of the Vollum Institute and Rocky and Julie Dixon Professor of Neurology at Oregon Health and Science University. Dr Westbrook is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Neuroscience. He has received Javits and Merit awards from NIH for his research as well as an International Cooperation Award from the Max Planck Society. Dr Westbrook received his medical training and did graduate study in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, followed by residencies in Internal Medicine and Neurology, and basic neuroscience research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Earlier work in his lab was mostly directed at the level of receptors, particularly N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the function of single synapses. The emphasis has now largely shifted to studies of small networks (microcircuits) in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Dr Westbrook maintains interests in clinical neurology, particularly epilepsy, as well as graduate research training – he currently serves as the director of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vollum/OHSU.

    Keywords

    Neuroscience; synaptic transmission; brain microcircuits; neurological diseases

    Competing interests statement: 

    Gary Westbrook is employed by Oregon Health and Science University. He receives research and training funding from the National Institutes of Health and the Ellison Medical Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He serves on Scientific Advisory Boards for Max Planck Institutes in Göttingen (MPIEM) and Florida (MPFI), the Myelin Repair Foundation, and on study sections for the National Institutes of Health. He is currently a member of editorial boards for Physiological Reviews and Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

  • Patricia Wittkopp

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Patricia Wittkopp received a BS from the University of Michigan, a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and did postdoctoral work at Cornell University. In 2005, she began a faculty position at the University of Michigan, where she is now an Arthur F Thurnau Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and LSA Honors Program. Her research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution of gene expression. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work. She was a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Fellow, an Alfred P Sloan Research Fellow, and a recipient of a March of Dimes Starter Scholar Award.

     

    Keywords

    Evolutionary genetics; evolution and development; gene expression; regulatory networks; allele-specific expression

    Competing interests statement: 

    Patricia Wittkopp has received research support from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, March of Dimes, and the Alfred P Sloan Foundation. She is currently an Associate Editor of Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution, and also serves on the Advisory Editorial Board of Trends in Genetics.

  • Huda Zoghbi

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Huda Zoghbi is Professor of Pediatrics, Neurology, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. She is also an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital. Her research focuses on understanding normal brain development and on elucidating the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including the autism spectrum disorder, Rett syndrome, and late-onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    Keywords

    Neurodegenerative disorders; polyglutamine disorders; autism; synaptic disorders; neurogenetics 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Huda Zoghbi is actively receiving funds from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, Rett Syndrome Research Trust, International Rett syndrome Foundation (and she is a member of advisory panels for all 4 organizations), Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children’s Hospital. She is Associate Editor of Annual Reviews of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial team of Cell and Neuron. She is Vice-Chair of the McKnight Neuroscience Fund and a member of the following Scientific Advisory Panels: the Jane Coffin Childs Fund,  Gruber Genetics Prize Jury, Janssen Prize Jury, Lasker Jury, and Vilcek Prize Jury. She was an elected member at large of the 2015 Class Membership Committee of the National Academy of Sciences.

All reviewing editors

  • Quarraisha Abdool Karim
    CAPRISA (South Africa)
    Research focus
    • HIV/AIDS
    • women and adolescent health
    • tuberculosis
  • Susan L Ackerman
    The Jackson Laboratory (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodegeneration
    • neurodevelopment
    • cerebellum
    • mouse genetics
  • Karen Adelman
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin structure
    • gene expression
    • transcription
  • Andres Aguilera
    University of Seville (Spain)
    Research focus
    • Genome instability
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • R loops
    • transcription-replication conflicts
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Julie Ahringer
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell fate
    • gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Asifa Akhtar
    Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Kari Alitalo
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • oncogenes
    • angiogenesis
    • vascular biology
  • Richard Amasino
    University of Wisconsin (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Brachypodium distachyon
  • Scott A Armstrong
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pediatric leukemia
    • cancer biology
  • Mohan Balasubramanian
    Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (Singapore) & University of Warwick (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cytokinesis
    • cell cycle
    • cytoskeleton
  • Utpal Banerjee
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Haematopoiesis
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Marlene Bartos
    University of Freiburg (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • GABAergic cells
    • network oscillations
    • synaptic plasticity
  • Philippe Bastiaens
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Systems biology
    • functional microscopy
    • signal transduction
    • quantitative biology
    • biosensors
  • David Baulcombe
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • RNA silencing
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Hugo J Bellen
    Baylor College of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Drosophila neurobiology
    • Drosophila neurodegeneration
    • Drosophila technology
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Nir Ben-Tal
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Structural bioinformatics
    • structure, function and motion in membrane proteins
    • protein interactions
  • James Berger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • microscopy
    • biochemistry
    • biophysics
    • DNA replication
    • ATPase mechanism
    • DNA topology
    • topoisomerases
    • helicases
  • Dwight Bergles
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Glia function
    • Neuron-glia interactions
  • Dominique Bergmann
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • plant development
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Carl T Bergstrom
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Game theory
    • network science
    • evolution
  • Richard M Berry
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Rotary molecular motors
    • bacterial flagellar motor
    • ATPase mechanism
    • single-molecule methods
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Upinder S Bhalla
    National Centre for Biological Sciences (India)
    Research focus
    • Olfaction
    • hippocampus
    • computational neuroscience
    • olfactory bulb
    • antibody
    • synapses
    • signaling
  • Pamela Bjorkman
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • immunology
    • HIV
  • Douglas L Black
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pre-mRNA splicing
    • post-transcriptional gene regulation
  • Clare Blackburn
    MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Thymus development, maintainance, and regeneration
    • thymic epithelial progenitor cell biology and regulation
    • differentiation of pluripotent cells
    • transcription factor networks
  • Benjamin J Blencowe
    University of Toronto (Canada)
    Research focus
    • RNA processing
    • epigenomics
    • transcriptome analyses
  • Jörg Bohlmann
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Metabolism
    • chemical ecology
    • plant genomics
    Experimental organism
    • Plants
  • Alexander Borst
    Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Visual processing
    • systems neuroscience
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Michael R Botchan
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Olga Boudker
    Weill Cornell Medical College (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane transport
    • glutamate pumps
  • Axel A Brakhage
    Friedrich Schiller University Jena and Hans-Knöll-Institut (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Infection biology of fungi
    • microbial secondary metabolism
    • microbial communication
    • biotechnology
    • transcription factors
    Experimental organism
    • Aspergillus
    • Myxococcus xanthus
    • Macrophages
    • Neutrophils
  • Hiram Brownell
    Boston College (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neuroscience
    • neuropsychology
    • methodology
    • communication impairments
  • Axel T Brunger
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • synaptic transmission
    • neurotransmitters
  • Margaret Buckingham
    Institut Pasteur (France)
    Research focus
    • Cardiogenesis
    • muscle stem cells
  • Christopher G Burd
    Yale University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Endocytosis
    • secretion
    • organelle biogenesis
    • phosphoinositide signaling
  • Neil Burgess
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • hippocampus
    • Episodic memory
    • Spatial navigation
    • Human short term memory
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • Rat
  • Ronald L Calabrese
    Emory University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Motor pattern generation
    • neuronal and small networks models
    • electrophysiological properties of neurons and synapse
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Leech
  • Xuetao Cao
    Zhejiang University School of Medicine (China)
    Research focus
    • Immunology of APCs
    • TLR signalling and immune regulation
    • cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy
  • Catherine Carr
    University of Maryland (United States)
    Research focus
    • Auditory neuroscience
  • Constance Cepko
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • viral vectors
    • retina
    • blindness
  • Agnieszka Chacinska
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (Poland)
    Research focus
    • Mitochondria
    • organelles
    • protein biogenesis
    • protein degradation
    • protein transport
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Baron Chanda
    University of Wisconsin - Madison (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channels
    • Voltage-gating
    • Temperature-sensing
    • Ligand-gating
    • Allostery and dynamics
    • Single molecule studies
    • Fluorometry
  • Moses V Chao
    New York University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular and cellular neurobiology
    • signal transduction
    • trophic factors
    • receptors
  • Zhijian J Chen
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • ubiquitin
  • Jon Clardy
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbial secondary metabolism
    • chemical communications
    • biosensors
    • chemical biology
    • microbial ecology and evolution
  • Jane Clarke
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Protein folding
    • protein misfolding
  • Philip Cole
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chemical biology
    • signal transduction
    • epigenetics
  • Kathleen Collins
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Telomerase
    • reverse transcriptase
    • ribonucleoprotein
    • Plant small RNAs
    • tRNA
    Experimental organism
    • Tetrahymena
  • Ben Cooper
    Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (Thailand)
    Research focus
    • Population biology of communicable diseases
    • antimicrobial resistance
    • epidemiological methods
  • Maurizio Corbetta
    Washington University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Attention networks
    • function and physiology of spontaneous activity
    • functional brain organization and stroke recovery
  • Giulio Cossu
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Stem cells
    • cell therapy
    • muscular dystrophies
    • clinical trials of cell therapies
  • Rui M Costa
    Champalimaud Center for the Unknown (Portugal)
    Research focus
    • Basal ganglia
    • striatum
    • dopamine
    • action
    • learning
    • electrophysiology
    • Cilia
    • motor
    • movement
    • cortex
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Iain D Couzin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Bird flocks
    • fish schools
    • insect swarms
    • consensus decision-making
    • collective behavior
    • evolution of migration
  • Ben Cravatt
    Scripps Research Institute (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chemical biology
    • neurochemistry
    • pharmacology
  • Jody C Culham
    Western University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Brain imaging
    • fMRI
    • Auditory neuroscience
    • vision
  • Michael Czech
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Insulin
    • metabolism
    • lipid-protein interactions
    • signal transduction
    • membranes
    • adipose
    • obesity
    • insulin resistance
    • diabetes
  • Chi V Dang
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
  • Lila Davachi
    New York University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Recognition
    • recollection
    • working memory
    • episodic encoding
  • Irwin Davidson
    Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/UDS (France)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • chromatin
    • cancer
  • Graeme W Davis
    University of California, San Francisco (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodegeneration
    • neural development
    • synaptic transmission
    • plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Roger Davis
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
  • Bernard de Massy
    Institute of Human Genetics, CNRS (France)
    Research focus
    • Recombination
    • meiosis
  • Ralph J DeBerardinis
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer
    • metabolism
    • medicine
    • genetics
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • mouse
  • Elisabetta Dejana
    FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (Italy)
    Research focus
    • Angiogenesis
    • cell adhesion
    • VE-cadherin
    • vascular permeability
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • endothelium
    • blood brain barrier
  • Job Dekker
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Spatial organisation of genomes
    • chromatin interaction networks
  • Raymond J Deshaies
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein degradation
    • proteasome
    • proteolysis
    • ubiquitin
  • Marcel Dicke
    Wageningen University (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Ecological entomology
    • plant–insect interactions
  • Andrew Dillin
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Aging mechanisms
    • heat shock response
    • endoplasmic reticulum stress
    • mitochondrial stress
  • Michael Doebeli
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modelling
    • evolution of diversity
    • social insects
    • ecology and evolution of microbial communities
  • Volker Dötsch
    Goethe University (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • signal transduction
  • Michael Dustin
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Immunological synapse
    • cell adhesion
    • T cell activation
    • immune cell migration
    • microscopy
  • Suzanne Eaton
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Developmental cell biology
    • tissue mechanics and morphogenesis
    • signaling
    • metabolism
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Sean R Eddy
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational genomics
    • RNA structure
    • homology search algorithms
  • Edward Egelman
    University of Virginia (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-EM
    • helicases
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
    • viruses
  • Howard Eichenbaum
    Boston University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neurobiology
    • hippocampus
    • antibody
  • Joel K Elmquist
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Body weight homeostasis
    • central autonomic control
    • diabetes and glucose homeostasis
    • neurobiology and neuroanatomy of the hypothalamus
  • Tonu Esko
    University of Tartu (Estonia)
    Research focus
    • Complex diseases
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Joaquin Espinosa
    University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Apoptosis
    • p53
    • tumor suppressors
    • cancer biology
  • Paul G Falkowski
    Rutgers University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Coral biology
    • biogeochemical cycles
    • biological oceanography
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • physiological adaptation
    • symbiosis
  • Reinhard Fässler
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • ECM
    • integrin adhesion and signalling
    • Cell biology
    • mouse genetics
  • Russ Fernald
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Behavioral biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • plant seeds
  • Jonathan Flint
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genetics
    • psychiatric disorders
  • Eduardo Franco
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Human biology and medicine
    • microbiology and infectious disease
    • cancer epidemiology and prevention
    • screening
    • human papillomavirus infection
  • Michael J Frank
    Brown University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational neuroscience
    • prefrontal cortex
    • basal ganglia
    • cognitive control
    • reinforcement learning
  • Matthew Freeman
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell signalling
    • trafficking
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Elaine Fuchs
    Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Skin stem cells
    • stem cells
    • tissue morphogenesis
    • epithelial polarity
    • transcriptional regulation during development
    • cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion
    • epithelial cancers
  • Fred Gage
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
    Research focus
    • Human stem cells
    • neurogenesis
  • Jack L Gallant
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neuroscience
    • computational neuroscience
    • systems neuroscience
  • Holger Gerhardt
    Max Delbrück Centre for Molecular Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • vascular biology
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
    • Zebrafish
  • Ronald N Germain
    National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (United States)
    Research focus
    • T-cell receptor signalling
    • immune cell migration
    • cell–cell interaction
  • Richard J Gilbertson
    Cambridge Cancer Center (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tumor biology
    • cancer stem cells
  • Michael Gilmore
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial cell biology
    • antibiotic resistance
    Experimental organism
    • Enterococci
  • Reid Gilmore
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Endoplasmic reticulum
    • protein translocation
  • Thomas Gingeras
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (United States)
    Research focus
    • Noncoding RNA
    • genome organisation
    • transcriptome analyses
    • DNA sequencing methods
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • David Ginsburg
    University of Michigan (United States)
    Research focus
    • genetics of global gene expression
    • mouse models of human disease
    • haematology
  • David D Ginty
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurotrophic factors
    • peripheral nervous system development
    • mechanosensory neurons
    • tactile processing
    • spinal cord
  • Christopher Glass
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • transcription
    • transcriptional genomics
    • macrophage biology
    • inflammation
  • Joseph G Gleeson
    The Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disease
    • brain development
  • Alison Goate
    The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States)
    Research focus
    • Dementia
    • addiction
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Yukiko Goda
    RIKEN Brain Science Institute (Japan)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • synapse cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • rodents
  • Michel Goedert
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tau
    • alpha-synuclein
    • neurodegeneration
    • protein misfolding
    • amyloid
  • Stephen P Goff
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Retrovirus replication
    • virus assembly
  • Joshua I Gold
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Perception
    • perceptual decision making
    • learning
    • electrophysiology
    Experimental organism
    • Primates
  • Michael R Green
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • RNA splicing
    • cancer molecular biology
  • Rachel Green
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mechanism of translation (bacterial and eukaryotic)
    • ribosome profiling
    • mRNA decay
    • translational control
    • ribosomes
  • Jean Greenberg
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Local and long distance signalling in innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • bacterial pathogens
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • N. benthamiana
    • Tomato
    • Pseudomonas
  • Peter Greenberg
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbe–microbe communication
  • Carol Greider
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Telomeres
  • Leslie C Griffith
    Brandeis University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Behavioral biology
    • molecular neurobiology
    • electrophysiology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Nikolaus Grigorieff
    Janelia Research Campus (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-EM
    • image processing
  • Eduardo A Groisman
    Yale University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial pathogens
    • symbionts
  • Taekjip Ha
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy
  • J Wade Harper
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein turnover
    • ubiquitin
    • autophagy
    • signal transduction
    • protein interactions
  • Maria J Harrison
    Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe symbioses
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant mineral nutrition
    Experimental organism
    • Glomus
    • Medicago
  • Stephen C Harrison
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • assembly and entry of viruses
    • membrane traffic
    • kinetochores
  • Richard P Harvey
    The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (Australia)
    Experimental organism
    • Mammalian heart
    • congenital heart diseases
    • cardiac regneration
    • cardiac gene regulatory networks
    • cardiac development
    • R. palustris
  • Simon I Hay
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Infectious diseases of the tropics
    • epidemiology
    Experimental organism
    • Plasmodia
    • Leishmania
    • viruses
  • Manajit Hayer-Hartl
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Molecular chaperones
    • protein folding and assembly
    • protein misfolding and aggregation
    • molecular machines
  • Edith Heard
    Institut Curie (France)
    Research focus
    • X-chromosome inactivation
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • nuclear organisation
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Ramanujan S Hegde
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Protein translocation
    • endoplasmic reticulum
    • quality control
    • protein degradation
    • membrane protein insertion
    • protein aggregation
    • in vitro reconstitution
  • Alan G Hinnebusch
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein synthesis
    • translational control
  • Helen Hobbs
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipid metabolism
    • cholesterol
    • human genetics
    • histones
  • Oliver Hobert
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • MicroRNAs
    • epigenetics
    • developmental neurobiology
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Valerie Horsley
    Yale University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Epithelial stem cells
    • adipocyte stem cells
    • adipose tissue
    • epithelial-mesenchymal interactions
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
  • John Huguenard
    Stanford University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Epilepsy
    • thalamocortical circuits
    • ion channels
    • Synaptic transmission
  • Tony Hyman
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Cell division
    • cytokinesis
    • cell polarity
    • organelles
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Johanna Ivaska
    University of Turku (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • addiction
    • migration
    • invasion
    • cancer
    • endosomal traffic
  • Richard Ivry
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Auditory neuroscience
    • temporal processing
    • executive control
    • motor learning
  • Elisa Izaurralde
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • RNA degradation
    • biochemistry
    • microRNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Reinhard Jahn
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • secretion
    • synaptic transmission
  • Torben Heick Jensen
    Aarhus University (Denmark)
    Research focus
    • RNA turnover
    • RNA processing
    • gene expression
    • transcription
  • Mark Jit
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Public Health England (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Immunisation
    • health economics
    • mathematical modelling of infectious diseases
  • Heidi Johansen-Berg
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Neural and cognitive plasticity
    • brain imaging
  • Katherine Jones
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional mechanisms
    • transcription mechanisms
    • HIV gene expression
    • APC / regulation of expression of growth control genes
  • Jos Jonkers
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Breast cancer
    • genetically engineered mouse models
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Frank Jülicher
    Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Active cellular processes
    • physics of the cytoskeleton and motor proteins
    • physics of cell division
    • tissues and developmental processes
    • ear & hearing
  • Merijn R Kant
    University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Chemical ecology
    • plant defense
    • plant--parasite interactions
    Experimental organism
    • Tomato
    • insects
    • mites
  • Lewis Kay
    University of Toronto (Canada)
    Research focus
    • NMR spectroscopy
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Laurent Keller
    University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Ecology
    • evolutionary genetics
    • social insects
  • Mary B Kennedy
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic plasticity
    • synaptic regulation
    • biochemical signal transduction networks
    • systems biology
  • Ole Kiehn
    Karolinska Institute (Sweden)
    Research focus
    • Neural circuits
    • motor
    • spinal cord
  • Eunjoon Kim
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (South Korea)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disorders
    • synapse development and plasticity
    • synaptic transmission
  • David Kleinfeld
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Active sensing
    • blood flow
    • brainstem
    • neuronal circuitry
    • optical imaging
    • sensorimotor control
  • Daniel J Kliebenstein
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe interactions
    • quantitative biology
    • genome-wide association studies
    • plant genomics
    • ecological genomics
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • secondary metabolism
    • plant–insect interactions
  • David M Knipe
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA topology
    • epigenetic regulation
    • latent infection
    • innate and intrinsic immunity
    • vaccines
  • Stephen C Kowalczykowski
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • membrane contact
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • single-molecule biophysics
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Michael Kozlov
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Modeling membrane shapes
    • membrane curvature
    • membrane fusion
    • membrane fission
    • membrane bending by proteins
  • Leonid Kruglyak
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Phenotypic variation
    • genetics of global gene expression
    • population genetics
    • Complex diseases
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Robb Krumlauf
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Hox genes
    • vertebrate development
    • axial patterning
    • craniofacial development
    • gene regulatory networks
    • developmental neurobiology
  • Urszula Krzych
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Malaria
    • adaptive immunity
    • vaccines
  • Werner Kühlbrandt
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • Retrotransposition
  • Tomohiro Kurosaki
    Osaka University (Japan)
    Research focus
    • B cells
    • antibody
    • signaling
  • Catherine Kyobutungi
    Africa Population Health Research Center (Kenya)
    Research focus
    • Epidemiology of non-communicable diseases
  • Pekka Lappalainen
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • alpha-synuclein
    • cytoskeleton -- membrane interplay
    • cell migration
  • Peter Latham
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • bayesian inference
    • network dynamics
    • neural coding
    • synaptic plasticity
  • Michael Laub
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • bacterial development
    • bacterial systems biology
    • signal transduction
  • Jeannie T Lee
    Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Noncoding RNA
    • X-chromosome inactivation
    • imprinting
    • epigenetics
    • chromatin
  • Bruno Lemaître
    Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • pattern recognition
    • entomopathogens
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • David Lentink
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Comparative biomechanics of flight
    Experimental organism
    • birds
    • insects
    • bats
    • plant seeds
  • Elena Levashina
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Malaria ecology
    • Mosquito immune system
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Richard Lewis
    Stanford University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channels
    • signal transduction
  • Marc Lipsitch
    Harvard School of Public Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modeling
    • evolution of pathogens
    • epidemiology of infectious diseases
    Experimental organism
    • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Cristina Lo Celso
    Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • topoisomerases
    • intravital microscopy
    • hematopoietic system
  • Ruth Loos
    The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States)
    Research focus
    • epidemiology
    • obesity and cardiometabolic traits
  • Liqun Luo
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • neural circuits
    • olfaction
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Gail Mandel
    Oregon Health and Science University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neuronal gene expression
    • astrocyte biology
  • Carol Mason
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Visual system development
    • Cell adhesion
    • axon guidance
  • Peggy Mason
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Nociceptive modulation
    • pain
    • serotonin
    • empathy
    • bulbospinal modulation
  • Joan Massagué
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • signaling
    • cell fate
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • metastasis
    Experimental organism
    • Human tissue
  • Diane Mathis
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • T cell activation
    • immunoregulation
    • autoimmunity
  • Sheila McCormick
    University of California, Berkeley & USDA Agricultural Research Service (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • signal transduction
    • plant gametophyte development
    • reproductive biology
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Tomato
  • Todd McDevitt
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Biomaterials
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • tissue engineering
  • Martin McMahon
    University of Utah (United States)
    Research focus
    • Metastatic melanoma
    • Lung cancer
    • Thyroid cancer
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
    • Human
  • Helen McNeill
    The Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cell polarity
    • eye movement
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Gil McVean
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
  • Tam Mignot
    Aix-Marseille University (France)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • motility
    • bacterial development
    • Bacterial cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • Myxococcus xanthus
  • Noboru Mizushima
    University of Tokyo (Japan)
    Research focus
    • Protein degradation
    • lysosome
    • autophagy
  • Lisa Monteggia
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Psychiatric disorders
    • depression
    • neurotrophin signaling
    • neurodevelopmental disorders
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • mouse
  • Andrew Morris
    University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • genetic epidemiology
    • methodological development
    • genome-wide association studies
  • Thomas D Mrsic-Flogel
    University of Oregon (United States)
    Research focus
    • Visual system development
    • high-resolution imaging
    • Sensory biology
  • Andrea Musacchio
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Kinetochore
    • cell cycle
    • centromere
  • Jeremy Nathans
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • planar cell polarity
    • photoreceptors
    • vision
    • ophthalmology
  • Klaus-Armin Nave
    Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Neuron-glia interactions
    • myelin-associated diseases
    • oligodendrocytes
    • Schwann cells
  • Richard A Neher
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolution of RNA viruses
    • biophysics
  • Sacha B Nelson
    Brandeis University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genome-wide gene expression in the nervous system
    • cellular and systems neurophysiology
    • forebrain development and function
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Other mammals
  • W James Nelson
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • cell adhesion
    • epithelia
    Experimental organism
    • Dictyostelium
  • Dianne Newman
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • Physiological functions of redox active "Secondary metabolites"
    Experimental organism
    • R. palustris
    • P. aeruginosa
  • Davis Ng
    Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory and National University of Singapore (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • Protein folding in the secretory pathway
    • regulation of organelle homeostasis
    • stress tolerance mechanisms
  • Timothy Nilsen
    Case Western Reserve University (United States)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • mechanism of miRNA function
    • RNA–protein interactions
    • mRNP composition and function
    • RNA biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Magnus Nordborg
    Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)
    Research focus
    • Adaptation
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
    • Molecular genetics
  • Thorsten Nurnberger
    University of Tübingen (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant immunity
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Roel Nusse
    Stanford School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • wnt signaling
    • stem cells
    • tissue repair
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
  • Duncan T Odom
    University of Cambridge / Cancer Research UK (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • transcriptional regulation
    • gene expression
    • evolution
    • genetics
  • Harry Orr
    University of Minnesota (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular genetics
    • neurodegenerative disease
    • spinocerebellar ataxia
  • Richard Palmiter
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genetics and behaviour
    • body weight control
    • catecholamines
    • mitochondria
  • Duojia Pan
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Maddy Parsons
    King's College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • motility
    • cell migration
    • adhesion receptor signalling
    • cancer metastasis
    • integrin signalling
  • Tatiana Pasternak
    University of Rochester (United States)
    Research focus
    • High level vision
    Experimental organism
    • Macaque monkeys
  • George H Perry
    Pennsylvania State University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Human evolution
    • Primates
    • Paleogenomics
    • Evolutionary and ecological genomics
  • Christine Petit
    Institut Pasteur (France)
    Research focus
    • Sensory biology
    • ear & hearing
    • genetics
  • Suzanne R Pfeffer
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane traffic
    • Complex diseases
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
    • secretory pathway
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
  • Joseph K Pickrell
    New York Genome Center & Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • population genetics
  • Jon Pines
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cyclins and Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cycosome (APC/C)
    • cell cycle
    • mitosis
    • spinocerebellar ataxia
  • Fiona M Powrie
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Mucosal immunity
    • inflammation
  • Ambra Pozzi
    Vanderbilt University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • extracellular matrix
    • mechanisms of fibrosis
    • receptor tyrosine kinases
    • kidney
    • cell signalling and translation
  • Nick J Proudfoot
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • transcription
  • Serge Przedborski
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Dementia
    • neurodegeneration
    • Mitochondria
  • Molly Przeworski
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolutionary biology
    • recombination
    Experimental organism
    • Primates
  • Louis Ptáĉek
    University of California, San Francisco (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurogenetics
    • circadian rhythms/sleep
    • episodic disorders
  • Yijun Qi
    Tsinghua University (China)
    Research focus
    • Plant small RNAs
    • long non-coding RNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Indira M Raman
    Northwestern University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Electrophysiology
    • ion channels
    • synaptic transmission
    • cerebellum
    • voltage-clamp
  • Mani Ramaswami
    Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)
    Research focus
    • Neurogenetics
    • neural circuits
    • olfaction
    • learning and memory
    • mechanisms of neuronal translational control
    • mRNA localization
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Jan-Marino Ramirez
    Seattle Children's Research Institute and University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Rhythmic activity
    • Rett syndrome
    • hypoxia
    • Epilepsy
  • Michael Rape
    UC Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ubiquitin
    • mitosis
  • Satyajit Rath
    National Institute of Immunology (India)
    Research focus
    • Physiological functions of redox active "Secondary metabolites"
    • lymphocyte development
    • lymphocyte responses
    • macrophage activation
    • immunity in disease
  • Jennifer Raymond
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • neural circuits
    • learning
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
  • Samara L Reck-Peterson
    University of California San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microtubule-based motors
    • intracellular transport
  • Danny Reinberg
    New York University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • chromatin biology
    • chromatin
    • histones
    • transcription
  • Jeremy Reiter
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cilia
  • Bing Ren
    University of California, San Diego School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • epigenomics
  • Fred Rieke
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Non-human primates
    • computational neuroscience
    • biophysics
  • Elizabeth Robertson
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional regulators
    • mammalian development
  • David Ron
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Chaperones
    • unfolded protein response
    • oxidative protein folding
    • protein synthesis
  • Christian Rosenmund
    Charité (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • neurotransmitter release
    • exocytosis
    • plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Other mammals
  • Lee L Rubin
    Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Spinal muscular atrophy
    • amyloid
    • Huntington's disease
    • reprogramming
  • Christian Rutz
    University of St Andrews (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Evolutionary ecology
    • Ecology
    • Animal tool use
    • Animal culture
    • Animal tracking (bio-logging/bio-telemetry)
    • Ornithology
    • Corvids
  • Shimon Sakaguchi
    Osaka University (Japan)
    Research focus
    • B cells
    • immune tolerance
    • autoimmune disease
    • tumor immunity
  • Emilio Salinas
    Wake Forest School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational neuroscience
    • perceptual decision making
    • neural circuit models
    • urgent choices
    • eye movement
    • monkey neurophysiology
    • vision
  • Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Regeneration
    Experimental organism
    • P. aeruginosa
  • Sjors HW Scheres
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • microscopy
    • molecular machines
  • Wolfram Schultz
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Reward
    • uncertainty
    • thalamocortical circuits
  • Kristin Scott
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • chemosensation
    • gustatory processing
    • Drosophila neuroscience
    • neural circuits
    • urgent choices
    Experimental organism
    • D. melanogaster
  • Jeffrey Settleman
    Calico Labs (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • signal transduction
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • signaling
    • epigenetics
  • Yibing Shan
    DE Shaw Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational structural biology
    • signaling
    • computational chemistry
    • molecular dynamics
  • Feng Shao
    National Institute of Biological Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial-fungal interaction
    • innate immunity
  • Kang Shen
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synapse
    • neuronal cytoskeleton
    • neuronal cell biology
    • developmental neurobiology
  • David Sherratt
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Ali Shilatifard
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin
    • ELLs
    • P-TEFb
    • Pol II
    • MLLs
    • chromosomal translocations and leukemia
    • enhancers
    • gene expression
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Barbara G Shinn-Cunningham
    Boston University (United States)
    Research focus
    • temperature-sensing
    • spatial hearing
    • neuro-electric imaging
    • neural coding
    • plasticity and learning in auditory tasks
  • Wenying Shou
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of cooperation and multi-level selection
    • microbial ecology and evolution
    • quantitative experimental biology
    • theoretical biology
  • Robert H Singer
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • mRNA localization
  • Frances K Skinner
    Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network (Canada)
    Research focus
    • hippocampus
    • neural circuit models
    • neurological diseases
  • Inna Slutsky
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • short-term plasticity
    • helicases
    Experimental organism
    • Rodents
  • Dominique Soldati-Favre
    University of Geneva (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Host-parasite interactions
    • apicomplexa biology
    • motility
    Experimental organism
    • Toxoplasma gondii
    • Plasmodium
  • Nahum Sonenberg
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Protein synthesis
    • cell signalling and translation
    • translational control of memory
  • Allan Spradling
    Carnegie Institution for Science (United States)
    Research focus
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • ovary
    • female reproduction
    • polyploid cell
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Deepak Srivastava
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Tissue stem cells
    • cardiac repair
    • cardiology
  • Gary Stacey
    University of Missouri (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development
    • host-microbe interactions
    • extracellular ATP
    • peptide transport
    Experimental organism
    • Soybean
  • Didier Y R Stainier
    Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Developmental genetics
    • Organogenesis
    • Tissue morphogenesis
    • Organ homeostasis
    Experimental organism
    • Zebrafish
  • Jonathan P Staley
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Catalysis
    • proofreading
    • RNA dynamics
  • Klaas Stephan
    University of Zurich and ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Translational neuromodeling
  • Beth Stevens
    Boston Children's Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neuron-glia interactions
    • synaptic pruning
    • phagocytic macrophages
    • microglia
  • Gisela Storz
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (United States)
    Research focus
    • Small noncoding RNAs
    • oxidative stress
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Sriram Subramaniam
    National Cancer Institute (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-electron microscopy
    • protein structure
    • HIV entry
    • correlative light and electron microscopy
    • electron tomography
    • automated image processing
  • Wesley Sundquist
    University of Utah (United States)
    Research focus
    • Virus-host interactions
    • retroviruses
    • HIV
    Experimental organism
    • Human cells
  • Karel Svoboda
    Janelia Research Campus (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cortex
    • somatosensation
    • imaging
    • calcium
    • neural circuits
    • sensorimotor
    • coding
    • synapse cell biology
    • dendrite
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Kenton J Swartz
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channel structure and mechanisms
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • temperature-sensing
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • lipid-protein interactions
  • Joseph S Takahashi
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular neuroscience
    • circadian clocks
    • mouse genetics
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
    • rodents
  • J Paul Taylor
    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurological disorders
    • RNA granules
    • protein quality control
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • M Dawn Teare
    University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tau
    • population genetics
    • epidemiology
  • Peter Tontonoz
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • lipid metabolism
    • obesity/diabetes
    • histones
  • Doris Y Tsao
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • monkey neurophysiology
    • mouse vision
    • neural circuit models
    • human brain stimulation with ultrasound
  • Naoshige Uchida
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Olfaction
    • perceptual decision making
    • learning
  • Eilon Vaadia
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Motor cortex
    • sensorimotor learning
    • brain machine Interface
    • cortical dynamics
    • neuronal synchrony
    • oscillations
    • active inference
    • motor control
  • Juan Valcárcel
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (Spain)
    Research focus
    • RNA processing
    • gene regulation
  • Alfonso Valencia
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (Spain)
    Research focus
    • Bioinformatics
    • structural bioinformatics
    • evodevo
    • cancer genomics
    • text mining
  • Wilfred van der Donk
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (United States)
    Research focus
    • Enzymology
    • chemical biology
    • natural product biosynthesis
    • cyclic peptides
    • antibiotics
  • Jos WM van der Meer
    Radboud University Medical Centre (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Infectious disease and host defense
    • innate immunity
    • trained immunity
    • immunodeficiency
    • autoinflammatory diseases
    • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Antoine M van Oijen
    University of Wollongong (Australia)
    Research focus
    • Single-molecule biophysics
    • protein--DNA interactions
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
  • Mark CW van Rossum
    University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • synaptic plasticity
    • noise in neural systems
    • the early visual system
    • retina
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • In vitro models of development and disease
    • Phenotypic variation
    • bone disease
    • tissue engineering
  • Amy J Wagers
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Blood-forming stem cells
    • muscle-forming stem cells
  • David Wallach
    The Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Immune defense
    • programmed cell death
    • activation of transcription factors
  • Yue Wang
    Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • Fungal pathogenesis
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • Bacterial-fungal interaction
    Experimental organism
    • Candida albicans
  • Zhiyong Wang
    Carnegie Institution for Science (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signaling networks and growth regulation
    • Signal transduction
    • Proteomics
    • Hormone
    Experimental organism
    • Maize
  • Clare M Waterman
    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Actin cytoskeleton
    • light microscopy
  • Oliver Weichenrieder
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Retrotransposition
    • regulatory mRNA
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • Karsten Weis
    ETH Zürich (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Nuclear transport
    • nuclear pore
    • mRNA transport
  • William I Weis
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell adhesion
    • wnt signaling
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • Andrew West
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurological disorders
    • neurodegeneration
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • rodents
  • Anne West
    Duke University Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional mechanisms
    • synapse development and plasticity
  • Tanya T Whitfield
    University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Animal models of human genetic disease
    • deafness
    • inner ear
    • sensory placodes
    Experimental organism
    • Zebrafish
  • Cynthia Wolberger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • enzymology
    • transcriptional regulation
    • ubiquitin signaling
  • Jerry L Workman
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein complexes
    • chromatin modification
    • regulation of gene transcription
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Yukiko M Yamashita
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan (United States)
    Research focus
    • Stem cells
    • stem cell niche
    • asymmetric division
    • spindle orientation
    • centrosome
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Wayne M Yokoyama
    Washington University (United States)
    Research focus
    • NK cells
    • innate immune system
    • topoisomerases
    • MCMV
    • CPXV
  • Richard J Youle
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mitochondria
    • cell death
  • Stephen G Young
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipoproteins
    • nuclear lamins
    • histones
    • triglyceride metabolism
    • cholesterol metabolism
  • Hao Yu
    National University of Singapore & Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • functional microscopy
    • plant reproductive development
    • phytohormone signalling
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Orchid
  • Hong Zhang
    Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Autophagy
    • lysosome
    • membrane contact
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Mingjie Zhang
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong S.A.R., China)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • neuronal development and signaling
    • cell polarity
    • scaffold proteins
  • Jian-Min Zhou
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)
    Research focus
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
  • Daniel Zilberman
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • epigenomics
    • evolution
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana

Biochemistry

Senior editors
  • Ivan Dikic

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Cell biology

    Ivan Dikic is a Professor and Chairman of Institute of Biochemistry II at the Medical School Goethe University and a member of the Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences in Frankfurt. He was trained as a medical doctor at Zagreb University and obtained his PhD in molecular biology with Joseph Schlessinger. His career is focused on studying intracellular signaling initially via protein tyrosine kinases where he revealed how multiple monoubiquitination controls EGFR endocytosis. His lab has pioneered a concept of Ubiquitin as a multivalent cellular signal that regulates multitude of physiological and pathophysiological processes including DNA repair, inflammation, cancer, infection and proteasomal degradation. Ivan’s group also provided structural and functional evidence for a new type of Ub chains that are Met1-linked (called linear ubiquitination) in promoting the NF-kB signaling. His current interests focus on selective autophagy, which is essential for the clearance of protein aggregates, pathogens, and damaged mitochondria from the cell.

    He has received many awards for his work including the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research, the Award of European Association for Cancer Research, the Hans Krebs Prize, the Leibniz Award and the Ernst Jung Award in Medicine. He is a Member of the German Academy for Sciences Leopoldina, Academia Europaea, Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization.


    Keywords

    Ubiquitination; autophagy; endocytosis; inflammation; cancer biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ivan Dikic receives funding from the Deutsche Forshungsemeinschaft and European Union, and serves as a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center of Protein Research Copenhagen, MRC Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination Unit Dundee, DKFZ-ZMBH Allianz. He is a chairman of the EMBO Publication Committee and is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, Developmental Cell, EMBO JournalEMBO Reports, BMC Biology, Biochemical Journal, and Cell Death and Differentiation.

  • Wenhui Li

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wenhui Li is an Investigator of the National Institute of Biological Sciences (NIBS), Beijing, China. He received a bachelor’s degree in medicine from the Medical School of Lanzhou University in 1994 and his PhD from the Peking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in 2001. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School, Li joined NIBS as an Assistant Investigator in 2007 and rose to the rank of Investigator in 2015. His team at NIBS identified a liver bile acids transporter (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide, NTCP) as a functional receptor for Hepatitis B and D virus. Li’s research interest has been focusing on the molecular mechanisms of viral infections: currently his laboratory combines virology, biochemistry, immunology, and chemical biology to investigate molecular mechanisms of HBV/HDV infection.

    Keywords

    Virus infection; hepatitis B/D virus; receptor; antivirals

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wenhui Li receives funding from the Ministry of Science and Technology, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the Science and Technology Bureau of Beijing Municipal Government. He serves as a member of the editorial boards of Chin J Virol (2011–), Virologica Sinica (2013–), and J Biol Chem (2016–).

  • Michael Marletta

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry

    Michael Marletta is the Aldo DeBenedictis Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Previous to his appointment at UC Berkeley, he was a former President and CEO of The Scripps Research Institute. He has also been on the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he was an HHMI Investigator, and MIT. Marletta obtained an A.B. in chemistry and biology from the State University of New York at Fredonia, a Ph.D. from UCSF under George Kenyon and, after a postdoctoral appointment at MIT under Chris Walsh, began his independent career. His work has spanned protein chemistry and enzymology. He has made many contributions to our understanding of nitric oxide signaling and more generally in molecular mechanisms of gas sensing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. More recent studies have involved novel enzymes involved with cellulose degradation. Marletta is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Keywords

    Chemical biology; nitric oxide signaling; gas sensing; structural basis of enzyme activity

    Competing interests statement: 

    Michael Marletta has received funding from the NIH, HHMI, and Burroughs-Wellcome Fund. He was a member of the PNAS Editorial Board (until July 2012) and Biochemistry. He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of Lycera, Inc., Galleon Pharmaceuticals, Viamet Pharmaceuticals, and N30. He serves on the Scientific Review Board of HHMI. He is an External Review Board member of the Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Georgia Tech School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Chair, Natural Science Advisory Council, SUNY Fredonia. He is a co-founder of Omniox, Inc.

Reviewing editors
  • James Berger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • microscopy
    • biochemistry
    • biophysics
    • DNA replication
    • ATPase mechanism
    • DNA topology
    • topoisomerases
    • helicases
  • Douglas L Black
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pre-mRNA splicing
    • post-transcriptional gene regulation
  • Michael R Botchan
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Agnieszka Chacinska
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (Poland)
    Research focus
    • Mitochondria
    • organelles
    • protein biogenesis
    • protein degradation
    • protein transport
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Jon Clardy
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbial secondary metabolism
    • chemical communications
    • biosensors
    • chemical biology
    • microbial ecology and evolution
  • Philip Cole
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chemical biology
    • signal transduction
    • epigenetics
  • Kathleen Collins
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Telomerase
    • reverse transcriptase
    • ribonucleoprotein
    • Plant small RNAs
    • tRNA
    Experimental organism
    • Tetrahymena
  • Ben Cravatt
    Scripps Research Institute (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chemical biology
    • neurochemistry
    • pharmacology
  • Irwin Davidson
    Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/UDS (France)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • chromatin
    • cancer
  • Raymond J Deshaies
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein degradation
    • proteasome
    • proteolysis
    • ubiquitin
  • Paul G Falkowski
    Rutgers University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Coral biology
    • biogeochemical cycles
    • biological oceanography
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • physiological adaptation
    • symbiosis
  • Reid Gilmore
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Endoplasmic reticulum
    • protein translocation
  • Rachel Green
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mechanism of translation (bacterial and eukaryotic)
    • ribosome profiling
    • mRNA decay
    • translational control
    • ribosomes
  • Nikolaus Grigorieff
    Janelia Research Campus (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-EM
    • image processing
  • Manajit Hayer-Hartl
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Molecular chaperones
    • protein folding and assembly
    • protein misfolding and aggregation
    • molecular machines
  • Ramanujan S Hegde
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Protein translocation
    • endoplasmic reticulum
    • quality control
    • protein degradation
    • membrane protein insertion
    • protein aggregation
    • in vitro reconstitution
  • Helen Hobbs
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipid metabolism
    • cholesterol
    • human genetics
    • histones
  • Elisa Izaurralde
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • RNA degradation
    • biochemistry
    • microRNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Mary B Kennedy
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic plasticity
    • synaptic regulation
    • biochemical signal transduction networks
    • systems biology
  • Stephen C Kowalczykowski
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • membrane contact
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • single-molecule biophysics
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Werner Kühlbrandt
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • Retrotransposition
  • Noboru Mizushima
    University of Tokyo (Japan)
    Research focus
    • Protein degradation
    • lysosome
    • autophagy
  • Andrea Musacchio
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Kinetochore
    • cell cycle
    • centromere
  • Davis Ng
    Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory and National University of Singapore (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • Protein folding in the secretory pathway
    • regulation of organelle homeostasis
    • stress tolerance mechanisms
  • Timothy Nilsen
    Case Western Reserve University (United States)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • mechanism of miRNA function
    • RNA–protein interactions
    • mRNP composition and function
    • RNA biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Jon Pines
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cyclins and Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cycosome (APC/C)
    • cell cycle
    • mitosis
    • spinocerebellar ataxia
  • Michael Rape
    UC Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ubiquitin
    • mitosis
  • David Ron
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Chaperones
    • unfolded protein response
    • oxidative protein folding
    • protein synthesis
  • Ali Shilatifard
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin
    • ELLs
    • P-TEFb
    • Pol II
    • MLLs
    • chromosomal translocations and leukemia
    • enhancers
    • gene expression
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Gary Stacey
    University of Missouri (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development
    • host-microbe interactions
    • extracellular ATP
    • peptide transport
    Experimental organism
    • Soybean
  • Wilfred van der Donk
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (United States)
    Research focus
    • Enzymology
    • chemical biology
    • natural product biosynthesis
    • cyclic peptides
    • antibiotics
  • Antoine M van Oijen
    University of Wollongong (Australia)
    Research focus
    • Single-molecule biophysics
    • protein--DNA interactions
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
  • Oliver Weichenrieder
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Retrotransposition
    • regulatory mRNA
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • William I Weis
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell adhesion
    • wnt signaling
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • Stephen G Young
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipoproteins
    • nuclear lamins
    • histones
    • triglyceride metabolism
    • cholesterol metabolism
  • Mingjie Zhang
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong S.A.R., China)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • neuronal development and signaling
    • cell polarity
    • scaffold proteins

Biophysics & structural biology

Senior editors
  • Richard Aldrich

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Neuroscience

    Rick Aldrich is the Karl Folkers Chair II in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research and Professor of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin. He joined the faculty in 2006 and served as chair until 2011. Previously he was on the faculty of Neurobiology (1985-1990) and of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (1990-2006) at Stanford University where he served as department chair from 20012004. He was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1990 to 2006. His work is on molecular mechanisms of ion channels and calcium signaling proteins, with an emphasis on understanding gated conformational changes and allosteric mechanisms. Work in the laboratory is multidisciplinary including electrophysiology, biochemistry, spectroscopy, informatics and computation. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He is past president of the Biophysical Society and the Society of General Physiologists, and has received the Kenneth Cole Award for Membrane Physiology from the Biophysical Society and Alden Spencer Award for Neuroscience Research from Columbia University.

    Keywords

    Ion channels; calcium binding proteins; membrane transport; allostery and cooperativity; cellular neurophysiology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Richard Aldrich is employed by The University of Texas at Austin. He receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health.He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He serves actively on the editorial boards of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and The Journal of General Physiology.

  • Arup K Chakraborty

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Immunology

    Arup Chakraborty is the Robert T Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at MIT. He is the founding Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He is also a founding steering committee member of the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. Chakraborty was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley from December 1988 to September 2005, after which he moved to MIT. The central theme of his research since 2000 is the development and application of theoretical/computational approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, to aid the quest for mechanistic principles in immunology, and then harness this understanding to aid the design of vaccines against mutable pathogens (e.g., HIV). A characteristic of his work is the impact of his studies on experimental immunology and clinical studies (he collaborates extensively with immunologists). Arup’s work at the interface of the physical and life sciences has been recognized by honors that include an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the EO Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Arup is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Keywords
    Computational biology; immunology; statistical mechanics; signaling; virology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Arup Chakraborty is funded by the NIH and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard.

  • John Kuriyan

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology

    John Kuriyan is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and also of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Before this, he was on the faculty at The Rockefeller University, New York, where he began his career in 1987, leaving for Berkeley in 2001. Since 1990, he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Kuriyan completed undergraduate studies in chemistry at Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA. His doctoral research, on the dynamics of proteins, was carried out at MIT, under the guidance of Greg Petsko and Martin Karplus (Harvard University). Kuriyan’s research is aimed at understanding the structure and mechanism of the enzymes and molecular switches that carry out cellular signal transduction and DNA replication. His laboratory uses x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins involved in signaling and replication, as well as biochemical, biophysical, and computational analyses to elucidate mechanisms. Kuriyan was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2001.

    Keywords

    Biochemistry and biophysics; structural biology of cell signaling and DNA replication

    Competing interests statement: 

    John Kuriyan has received funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the US National Institutes of Health, and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. He serves on the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and on the Scientific Advisory Boards of Carmot Therapeutics (San Francisco) and Jubilant Biosys (Bangalore). He is a founder of Nurix (San Francisco).

     

Reviewing editors
  • Nir Ben-Tal
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Structural bioinformatics
    • structure, function and motion in membrane proteins
    • protein interactions
  • James Berger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • microscopy
    • biochemistry
    • biophysics
    • DNA replication
    • ATPase mechanism
    • DNA topology
    • topoisomerases
    • helicases
  • Richard M Berry
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Rotary molecular motors
    • bacterial flagellar motor
    • ATPase mechanism
    • single-molecule methods
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Pamela Bjorkman
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • immunology
    • HIV
  • Olga Boudker
    Weill Cornell Medical College (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane transport
    • glutamate pumps
  • Axel T Brunger
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • synaptic transmission
    • neurotransmitters
  • Baron Chanda
    University of Wisconsin - Madison (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channels
    • Voltage-gating
    • Temperature-sensing
    • Ligand-gating
    • Allostery and dynamics
    • Single molecule studies
    • Fluorometry
  • Jane Clarke
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Protein folding
    • protein misfolding
  • Volker Dötsch
    Goethe University (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • signal transduction
  • Edward Egelman
    University of Virginia (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-EM
    • helicases
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
    • viruses
  • Paul G Falkowski
    Rutgers University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Coral biology
    • biogeochemical cycles
    • biological oceanography
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • physiological adaptation
    • symbiosis
  • Nikolaus Grigorieff
    Janelia Research Campus (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-EM
    • image processing
  • Taekjip Ha
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy
  • Stephen C Harrison
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • assembly and entry of viruses
    • membrane traffic
    • kinetochores
  • Manajit Hayer-Hartl
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Molecular chaperones
    • protein folding and assembly
    • protein misfolding and aggregation
    • molecular machines
  • Reinhard Jahn
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • secretion
    • synaptic transmission
  • Frank Jülicher
    Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Active cellular processes
    • physics of the cytoskeleton and motor proteins
    • physics of cell division
    • tissues and developmental processes
    • ear & hearing
  • Lewis Kay
    University of Toronto (Canada)
    Research focus
    • NMR spectroscopy
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Stephen C Kowalczykowski
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • membrane contact
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • single-molecule biophysics
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Werner Kühlbrandt
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • Retrotransposition
  • Richard Lewis
    Stanford University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channels
    • signal transduction
  • Andrea Musacchio
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Kinetochore
    • cell cycle
    • centromere
  • Samara L Reck-Peterson
    University of California San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microtubule-based motors
    • intracellular transport
  • Sjors HW Scheres
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • microscopy
    • molecular machines
  • Yibing Shan
    DE Shaw Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational structural biology
    • signaling
    • computational chemistry
    • molecular dynamics
  • Sriram Subramaniam
    National Cancer Institute (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cryo-electron microscopy
    • protein structure
    • HIV entry
    • correlative light and electron microscopy
    • electron tomography
    • automated image processing
  • Wesley Sundquist
    University of Utah (United States)
    Research focus
    • Virus-host interactions
    • retroviruses
    • HIV
    Experimental organism
    • Human cells
  • Kenton J Swartz
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channel structure and mechanisms
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • temperature-sensing
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • lipid-protein interactions
  • Antoine M van Oijen
    University of Wollongong (Australia)
    Research focus
    • Single-molecule biophysics
    • protein--DNA interactions
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
  • Clare M Waterman
    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Actin cytoskeleton
    • light microscopy
  • Oliver Weichenrieder
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Retrotransposition
    • regulatory mRNA
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • William I Weis
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell adhesion
    • wnt signaling
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • Cynthia Wolberger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • enzymology
    • transcriptional regulation
    • ubiquitin signaling
  • Mingjie Zhang
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong S.A.R., China)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • neuronal development and signaling
    • cell polarity
    • scaffold proteins

Cancer biology

Senior editors
  • Fiona Watt

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Fiona Watt is internationally recognised for elucidating the mechanisms that control epidermal stem cell renewal, differentiation and tissue assembly, and discovering how those processes are deregulated in disease. She obtained her DPhil from Oxford University and was a postdoc at MIT. She established her first laboratory at the Kennedy Institute in London and then moved to the Cancer Research UK (CR-UK) London Research Institute (formerly known as the Imperial Cancer Research Fund), where she worked for 20 years. From 2007 to 2012 she was the inaugural Herchel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Cambridge, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research and Deputy Director of the CR-UK Cambridge Research Institute. Since 2012 she has been Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King’s College London. Fiona Watt is a member of EMBO, a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society and an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; stem cell biology; biology cancer cell stem

    Competing interests statement: 

    Fiona Watt receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK and the European Commission. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Expert Review of Dermatology, Cell Stem Cell, StemBook, the Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, and EMBO Molecular Medicine. She is a member of the ‘Faculty of 1000’ online review service (section head, stem cells and regeneration). She is a member of the International Society for Stem Cell Research Board of Directors, a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Canadian Stem Cell Network, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, North East England Stem Cell Institute, Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) of Kyoto University, Fondazione Piemontese per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), Ontario-wide Stem Cell initiative and Centre for Commercialization in Regenerative Medicine, and the Institute of Bioengineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). She is a member of the Wellcome Trust Investigator Awards, expert review group, Cell and Developmental Biology, and a member of the Steering Committee for the UK Stem Cell Bank.

  • Tony Hunter

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Cell biology

    Tony Hunteris the Renato Dulbecco Chair in Cancer Research, Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center and an American Cancer Society Professor in the Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. In 1979, through his work on tumor viruses, he discovered a new class of protein kinase that phosphorylate tyrosine. He has spent most of the last 35 years studying protein kinases and phosphatases, and the role of protein phosphorylation in cell proliferation and the cell cycle, and how aberrant protein phosphorylation can cause cancer. His group also works on other types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including ubiquitylation and sumoylation, and crosstalk between PTMs. He has received many awards for his work on tyrosine phosphorylation, including a Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Wolf Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Philosophical Society.

    Keywords
    Signaling pathways in animal and human cells; cell cycle; phosphorylation; protein modification; cancer

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tony Hunter receives funding from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and serves as Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center funded by an NCI Cancer Center Support Grant. He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Cancer Center, the Van Andel Research Institute, and the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology. He is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, the Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesEMBO Journal, and EMBO Reports.

     

  • Sean Morrison

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Human biology & medicine

    The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. Dr Morrison obtained his BSc in biology and chemistry from Dalhousie University (1991), then completed a PhD in immunology at Stanford University (1996), and a postdoctoral fellowship in neurobiology at Caltech (1999). From 1999 to 2011, Dr Morrison was at the University of Michigan where he Directed their Center for Stem Cell Biology. Recently, Dr Morrison moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he is the founding Director of the new Children’s Research Institute. Dr Morrison’s laboratory studies the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, as well as the role these mechanisms play in cancer. Dr Morrison was a Searle Scholar (2000–2003), was named in Technology Review Magazine’s list of 100 young innovators (2002), received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2003), the International Society for Hematology and Stem Cell’s McCulloch and Till Award (2007), the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award (2008), and a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Morrison has also been active in public policy issues surrounding stem cells. For example, he has twice testified before Congress and was a leader in the successful “Proposal 2” campaign to protect stem cell research in Michigan’s state constitution.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; tissue stem cells; hematopoietic system

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sean Morrison receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. In addition to being a Senior editor for eLife, he is a member of the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell, the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the EMBO Journal, the Faculty of 1000, Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Cancer Cell, EMBO Reports, and Stem Cell Reports. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the University of Washington Institute for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, the University of California, Los Angeles Broad Stem Cell Research Center, and the Common Fund for the National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine. He is President-Elect of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. He is a co-founder and shareholder in OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, a consultant and shareholder in G1 Therapeutics, a shareholder in Fate Therapeutics, and a consultant for Molecular Devices.

  • Charles Sawyers

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Charles Sawyers is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His studies of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase function in chronic myeloid leukemia, in collaboration with Brian Druker and Novartis, led to the development of the kinase inhibitor imatinib as primary therapy for CML. This was followed by his discovery that BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations confer imatinib resistance, and development of the second generation Abl kinase inhibitor dasatinib, in collaboration with Bristol Myers Squibb. Sawyers' current work in prostate cancer resulted in the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (MDV3100), discovered in collaboration with University of California, Los Angeles chemist Michael Jung, which received FDA approval in 2012. Sawyers is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and co-recipient of the 2009 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.

    Keywords
    Oncology; translational medicine

    Competing interests statement: 

    Charles Sawyers receives research funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. He is President Elect of the American Association of Cancer Research and will serve as President from 201314. He is a Councilor of the American Association of Physicians (until 2017) and serves on the editorial boards of Cell and Cancer Cell, and as a scientific advisor to Agios, Aragon, Aveo, Housey Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Nextech, Pfizer, and Tracon.

     

  • Kevin Struhl

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Kevin Struhl received a BS and MS from MIT, a PhD from Stanford University Medical School, and did postdoctoral work at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. He has been in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School since 1982, was acting Chair from 1997–98, and has been the David Wesley Gaiser Professor since 1991. His research combines genetic, molecular, genomic, and evolutionary approaches to address a wide variety of fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structure in yeast. In addition, he is interested in elucidating transcriptional regulatory circuits that mediate the process of cellular transformation and the formation of cancer stem cells. He has authored or co-authored nearly 300 research articles and reviews, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He received the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and is a Distinguished Researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in Crete. Dr. Struhl is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Medicine.

    Keywords

    Transcription mechanisms; gene regulation; chromatin; mRNA decay; biological function; cellular transformation; cancer stem cells

Reviewing editors
  • Kari Alitalo
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • oncogenes
    • angiogenesis
    • vascular biology
  • Scott A Armstrong
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pediatric leukemia
    • cancer biology
  • Utpal Banerjee
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Haematopoiesis
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Xuetao Cao
    Zhejiang University School of Medicine (China)
    Research focus
    • Immunology of APCs
    • TLR signalling and immune regulation
    • cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy
  • Chi V Dang
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
  • Irwin Davidson
    Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/UDS (France)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • chromatin
    • cancer
  • Elisabetta Dejana
    FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (Italy)
    Research focus
    • Angiogenesis
    • cell adhesion
    • VE-cadherin
    • vascular permeability
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • endothelium
    • blood brain barrier
  • Joaquin Espinosa
    University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Apoptosis
    • p53
    • tumor suppressors
    • cancer biology
  • Eduardo Franco
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Human biology and medicine
    • microbiology and infectious disease
    • cancer epidemiology and prevention
    • screening
    • human papillomavirus infection
  • Richard J Gilbertson
    Cambridge Cancer Center (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tumor biology
    • cancer stem cells
  • Michael R Green
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • RNA splicing
    • cancer molecular biology
  • Johanna Ivaska
    University of Turku (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • addiction
    • migration
    • invasion
    • cancer
    • endosomal traffic
  • Jos Jonkers
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Breast cancer
    • genetically engineered mouse models
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Joan Massagué
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • signaling
    • cell fate
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • metastasis
    Experimental organism
    • Human tissue
  • Martin McMahon
    University of Utah (United States)
    Research focus
    • Metastatic melanoma
    • Lung cancer
    • Thyroid cancer
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
    • Human
  • Duojia Pan
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Ali Shilatifard
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin
    • ELLs
    • P-TEFb
    • Pol II
    • MLLs
    • chromosomal translocations and leukemia
    • enhancers
    • gene expression
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Alfonso Valencia
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (Spain)
    Research focus
    • Bioinformatics
    • structural bioinformatics
    • evodevo
    • cancer genomics
    • text mining

Cell biology

Senior editors
  • Randy Schekman

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Randy Schekman was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, with James Rothman and Thomas Sudhof. He is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His work concerns the mechanism of membrane assembly and vesicular traffic in eukaryotic cells. He and his laboratory discovered many of the genes and proteins required for secretion in yeast and they have applied this knowledge to understand human genetic diseases that affect core components of the secretory machinery. Among other awards, he shared the Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Lasker Award with James Rothman. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, he was elected President of the American Society for Cell Biology in 1999 and served as Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from 2006 to late 2011.

    Keywords

    Membrane assembly; vesicular trafficking; protein transport; animal and human cell biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Randy Schekman has received funding from the HHMI, the UC Berkeley Miller Foundation and from the Glenn Foundation. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Annual Reviews of Cell and Developmental Biology, Head of Faculty for Cell Biology for F1000, the Scientific Director of the Jane Coffin Childs Fund (ends 2012), and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Tamasek Life Science laboratory, Singapore (ends 2012). He was the Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (until 2011), and was an elected Council member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (until this year).

  • Anna Akhmanova

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Anna Akhmanova is a Professor of Cell Biology at the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She studied biochemistry and molecular biology at the Moscow State University and obtained her PhD at the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Akhmanova studies cytoskeletal organization and trafficking processes, which contribute to cell polarization, differentiation, vertebrate development and human disease. The main focus of the work in her group is the microtubule cytoskeleton. Research in the group relies on combining high-resolution live cell imaging and quantitative analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics with in vitro reconstitution experiments. Her work has resulted in identification and characterization of a broad variety of factors which control microtubule organization and dynamics and motor attachment to membrane organelles. Anna Akhmanova is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

     

    Keywords

    Cytoskeletal dynamics; microtubule-binding proteins; microtubule-based motors; membrane transport

    Competing interests statement: 

    Anna Akhmanova receives funding from the European Research Council, Human Frontier Science Program, and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience. She served on the editorial boards of BMC Cell Biology and Journal of Biological Chemistry. She is a currently on the editorial boards of PLOS Biology, Journal of Cell Science, Traffic, and BioArchitecture.

  • Jonathan A Cooper

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Jon Cooper is a member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he is also a Senior Vice-President and Director of the Division of Basic Sciences. He holds an Affiliate Professor appointment in the Biochemistry department at the University of Washington. After undergraduate studies at the University of Cambridge and post-graduate research at the University of Warwick, he performed postdoctoral research with Bernard Moss at the NIH and with Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute. With Tony, he found that oncogenic retroviruses (Rous sarcoma virus and others) and growth factors (EGF and PDGF) stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of overlapping subsets of cell proteins, which were candidates to regulate cell proliferation and metabolism. He joined Fred Hutch in 1985 to continue the work he started at the Salk, investigating the mechanisms by which protein kinases regulate cell proliferation and transformation. His laboratory played important roles in establishing how Src is regulated, how activated growth factor receptors recruit signaling proteins, and Ras-Raf-MAPK signaling. In 1995, postdoc Brian Howell knocked out the gene for a Src substrate and observed a distinctive brain development phenotype. Efforts by several laboratories rapidly established a signaling pathway that regulates neuron migrations during brain development. Further studies on this pathway revealed the importance of ubiquitination and degradation for terminating signaling, and led in recent years to detailed investigation of the roles of Cullin-RING ligases in regulating signal transduction events in vivo and in cultured cells.

     

    Keywords

    Signaling pathways; cell migration; phosphorylation; cell transformation

    Competing interests statement: 

    Jon Cooper receives research grants from the NIH and he serves on the editorial board of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

  • Ivan Dikic

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Cell biology

    Ivan Dikic is a Professor and Chairman of Institute of Biochemistry II at the Medical School Goethe University and a member of the Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences in Frankfurt. He was trained as a medical doctor at Zagreb University and obtained his PhD in molecular biology with Joseph Schlessinger. His career is focused on studying intracellular signaling initially via protein tyrosine kinases where he revealed how multiple monoubiquitination controls EGFR endocytosis. His lab has pioneered a concept of Ubiquitin as a multivalent cellular signal that regulates multitude of physiological and pathophysiological processes including DNA repair, inflammation, cancer, infection and proteasomal degradation. Ivan’s group also provided structural and functional evidence for a new type of Ub chains that are Met1-linked (called linear ubiquitination) in promoting the NF-kB signaling. His current interests focus on selective autophagy, which is essential for the clearance of protein aggregates, pathogens, and damaged mitochondria from the cell.

    He has received many awards for his work including the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research, the Award of European Association for Cancer Research, the Hans Krebs Prize, the Leibniz Award and the Ernst Jung Award in Medicine. He is a Member of the German Academy for Sciences Leopoldina, Academia Europaea, Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization.


    Keywords

    Ubiquitination; autophagy; endocytosis; inflammation; cancer biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ivan Dikic receives funding from the Deutsche Forshungsemeinschaft and European Union, and serves as a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center of Protein Research Copenhagen, MRC Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination Unit Dundee, DKFZ-ZMBH Allianz. He is a chairman of the EMBO Publication Committee and is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, Developmental Cell, EMBO JournalEMBO Reports, BMC Biology, Biochemical Journal, and Cell Death and Differentiation.

  • Tony Hunter

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Cell biology

    Tony Hunteris the Renato Dulbecco Chair in Cancer Research, Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center and an American Cancer Society Professor in the Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. In 1979, through his work on tumor viruses, he discovered a new class of protein kinase that phosphorylate tyrosine. He has spent most of the last 35 years studying protein kinases and phosphatases, and the role of protein phosphorylation in cell proliferation and the cell cycle, and how aberrant protein phosphorylation can cause cancer. His group also works on other types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including ubiquitylation and sumoylation, and crosstalk between PTMs. He has received many awards for his work on tyrosine phosphorylation, including a Gairdner International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Wolf Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Philosophical Society.

    Keywords
    Signaling pathways in animal and human cells; cell cycle; phosphorylation; protein modification; cancer

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tony Hunter receives funding from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and serves as Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center funded by an NCI Cancer Center Support Grant. He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Cancer Center, the Van Andel Research Institute, and the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology. He is on the editorial boards of CellMolecular Cell, the Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesEMBO Journal, and EMBO Reports.

     

  • Vivek Malhotra

    Expertise: 
    • Cell biology

    Vivek Malhotra was a professor in the biology division at UC San Diego until 2007 and is now the ICREA Professor and Chair of the Cell and Developmental Biology at Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona. His research focuses on a central station of the secretory pathway, the Golgi complex. Specifically, his work has resulted in the identification of the machinery required for the sorting and packaging of secretory cargoes. His recent work has uncovered a novel secretory routing that bypasses the conventional pathway of protein secretion. He received his BSc from Stirling University and was a Pirie–Reid scholar at Oxford; a Damon Runyon Walter Winchell and an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at Stanford; and Basil O’Conner scholar, established Investigator of the American Heart Association, and Senior Investigator of Sandler’s Foundation for Asthma at UC San Diego. He received the MERCK award from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is a fellow of the American association of the arts and science, and is an elected EMBO member.

    Keywords

    Golgi; membranes; protein secretions; cell compartmentation; organelle biogenesis and division

    Competing interests statement: 

    Vivek Malhotra receives funding from ERC/European Research Council, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, AGAUR and the Plan Nacional (Spain) He is a Scientific Advisory Board member of TIGEM (Naples, Italy), CNR (Naples, Italy), CBMSO (Madrid, Spain) and Department of Biotechnology (India). He has served on the editorial board of Cell and was an associate editor of Molecular Biology of the Cell. He is currently on the editorial boards of Journal of Cell Biology and Current Opinion in Cell Biology.

Reviewing editors
  • Kari Alitalo
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • oncogenes
    • angiogenesis
    • vascular biology
  • Mohan Balasubramanian
    Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (Singapore) & University of Warwick (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cytokinesis
    • cell cycle
    • cytoskeleton
  • Philippe Bastiaens
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Systems biology
    • functional microscopy
    • signal transduction
    • quantitative biology
    • biosensors
  • Dominique Bergmann
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • plant development
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Margaret Buckingham
    Institut Pasteur (France)
    Research focus
    • Cardiogenesis
    • muscle stem cells
  • Christopher G Burd
    Yale University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Endocytosis
    • secretion
    • organelle biogenesis
    • phosphoinositide signaling
  • Agnieszka Chacinska
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (Poland)
    Research focus
    • Mitochondria
    • organelles
    • protein biogenesis
    • protein degradation
    • protein transport
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Zhijian J Chen
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • ubiquitin
  • Michael Czech
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Insulin
    • metabolism
    • lipid-protein interactions
    • signal transduction
    • membranes
    • adipose
    • obesity
    • insulin resistance
    • diabetes
  • Chi V Dang
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
  • Roger Davis
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
  • Ralph J DeBerardinis
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer
    • metabolism
    • medicine
    • genetics
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • mouse
  • Elisabetta Dejana
    FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (Italy)
    Research focus
    • Angiogenesis
    • cell adhesion
    • VE-cadherin
    • vascular permeability
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • endothelium
    • blood brain barrier
  • Andrew Dillin
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Aging mechanisms
    • heat shock response
    • endoplasmic reticulum stress
    • mitochondrial stress
  • Volker Dötsch
    Goethe University (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • signal transduction
  • Joaquin Espinosa
    University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Apoptosis
    • p53
    • tumor suppressors
    • cancer biology
  • Reinhard Fässler
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • ECM
    • integrin adhesion and signalling
    • Cell biology
    • mouse genetics
  • Matthew Freeman
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell signalling
    • trafficking
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Carol Greider
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Telomeres
  • J Wade Harper
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein turnover
    • ubiquitin
    • autophagy
    • signal transduction
    • protein interactions
  • Ramanujan S Hegde
    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Protein translocation
    • endoplasmic reticulum
    • quality control
    • protein degradation
    • membrane protein insertion
    • protein aggregation
    • in vitro reconstitution
  • Valerie Horsley
    Yale University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Epithelial stem cells
    • adipocyte stem cells
    • adipose tissue
    • epithelial-mesenchymal interactions
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
  • Tony Hyman
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Cell division
    • cytokinesis
    • cell polarity
    • organelles
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Johanna Ivaska
    University of Turku (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • addiction
    • migration
    • invasion
    • cancer
    • endosomal traffic
  • Elisa Izaurralde
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • RNA degradation
    • biochemistry
    • microRNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Michael Kozlov
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Modeling membrane shapes
    • membrane curvature
    • membrane fusion
    • membrane fission
    • membrane bending by proteins
  • Werner Kühlbrandt
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • Retrotransposition
  • Pekka Lappalainen
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • alpha-synuclein
    • cytoskeleton -- membrane interplay
    • cell migration
  • Michael Laub
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • bacterial development
    • bacterial systems biology
    • signal transduction
  • Joan Massagué
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • signaling
    • cell fate
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • metastasis
    Experimental organism
    • Human tissue
  • Sheila McCormick
    University of California, Berkeley & USDA Agricultural Research Service (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • signal transduction
    • plant gametophyte development
    • reproductive biology
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Tomato
  • Helen McNeill
    The Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cell polarity
    • eye movement
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Noboru Mizushima
    University of Tokyo (Japan)
    Research focus
    • Protein degradation
    • lysosome
    • autophagy
  • Andrea Musacchio
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Kinetochore
    • cell cycle
    • centromere
  • W James Nelson
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • cell adhesion
    • epithelia
    Experimental organism
    • Dictyostelium
  • Davis Ng
    Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory and National University of Singapore (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • Protein folding in the secretory pathway
    • regulation of organelle homeostasis
    • stress tolerance mechanisms
  • Thorsten Nurnberger
    University of Tübingen (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant immunity
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Duojia Pan
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Maddy Parsons
    King's College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • motility
    • cell migration
    • adhesion receptor signalling
    • cancer metastasis
    • integrin signalling
  • Suzanne R Pfeffer
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane traffic
    • Complex diseases
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
    • secretory pathway
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
  • Jon Pines
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cyclins and Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cycosome (APC/C)
    • cell cycle
    • mitosis
    • spinocerebellar ataxia
  • Ambra Pozzi
    Vanderbilt University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • extracellular matrix
    • mechanisms of fibrosis
    • receptor tyrosine kinases
    • kidney
    • cell signalling and translation
  • Nick J Proudfoot
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • transcription
  • Michael Rape
    UC Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ubiquitin
    • mitosis
  • Samara L Reck-Peterson
    University of California San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microtubule-based motors
    • intracellular transport
  • Danny Reinberg
    New York University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • chromatin biology
    • chromatin
    • histones
    • transcription
  • Jeremy Reiter
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cilia
  • David Ron
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Chaperones
    • unfolded protein response
    • oxidative protein folding
    • protein synthesis
  • Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Regeneration
    Experimental organism
    • P. aeruginosa
  • Kang Shen
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synapse
    • neuronal cytoskeleton
    • neuronal cell biology
    • developmental neurobiology
  • David Sherratt
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Robert H Singer
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • mRNA localization
  • Jonathan P Staley
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Catalysis
    • proofreading
    • RNA dynamics
  • Peter Tontonoz
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • lipid metabolism
    • obesity/diabetes
    • histones
  • David Wallach
    The Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Immune defense
    • programmed cell death
    • activation of transcription factors
  • Yue Wang
    Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • Fungal pathogenesis
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • Bacterial-fungal interaction
    Experimental organism
    • Candida albicans
  • Clare M Waterman
    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Actin cytoskeleton
    • light microscopy
  • Karsten Weis
    ETH Zürich (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Nuclear transport
    • nuclear pore
    • mRNA transport
  • Richard J Youle
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mitochondria
    • cell death
  • Hong Zhang
    Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Autophagy
    • lysosome
    • membrane contact
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans

Computational & systems biology

Senior editors
  • Naama Barkai

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology

    Naama Barkai is a systems and computational biologist interested in how bio-molecular circuits are designed. She joined the Weizmann Institute in 1999, following a post-doc (Princeton) and graduate studies (Hebrew University) in physics. She is currently chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics, and the head of the Azrieli and Kahan Centers for Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute. In 2013, Barkai was elected to a Vallee Foundation Visiting Professorship and awarded the Abisch Frankel prize.

    Keywords

    Systems biology; modeling; functional genomics; yeast genetics; morphogen gradients

    Competing interests statement: 

    Naama Barkai's main funding sources are from the European Research Council (ERC), the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), the Israel Science Foundation (ISF), Minerva, and the Bi-national Science Foundation (BSF). Barkai also serves on the editorial board of Development.

  • Arup K Chakraborty

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Immunology

    Arup Chakraborty is the Robert T Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at MIT. He is the founding Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He is also a founding steering committee member of the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. Chakraborty was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley from December 1988 to September 2005, after which he moved to MIT. The central theme of his research since 2000 is the development and application of theoretical/computational approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, to aid the quest for mechanistic principles in immunology, and then harness this understanding to aid the design of vaccines against mutable pathogens (e.g., HIV). A characteristic of his work is the impact of his studies on experimental immunology and clinical studies (he collaborates extensively with immunologists). Arup’s work at the interface of the physical and life sciences has been recognized by honors that include an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the EO Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Arup is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Keywords
    Computational biology; immunology; statistical mechanics; signaling; virology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Arup Chakraborty is funded by the NIH and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard.

  • Aviv Regev

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Aviv Regev is a computational biologist who joined the Broad Institute as a core member and MIT as a faculty member in 2006. Her work investigates how complex molecular networks function and evolve in the face of genetic and environmental changes, over time-scales ranging from minutes to millions of years. Regev received her MSc from Tel Aviv University, studying biology, computer science, and mathematics in the Interdisciplinary Program for the Fostering of Excellence, where she undertook research in both theoretical and experimental biology. She received her PhD in computational biology from Tel Aviv University. Prior to joining the Broad Institute, Regev was a fellow at the Bauer Center for Genomics Research at Harvard University, where she developed new approaches to the reconstruction of regulatory networks and modules from genomic data. Regev is also an associate professor in the Department of Biology at MIT
and director of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad. Regev is the Director of the Cell Circuits Program at the Broad and a lead principal investigator for the Center for Cell Circuits at the Broad Institute, a Center of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS). Regev has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist since 2009, and was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in 2013. She is a recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, a Sloan fellowship from the Sloan Foundation, the Overton Prize from the International Society for Computational Biology, and the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).

    (Image Credit: Maria Nemchuk)

    Keywords

    Computational biology; single cell genomics; systems biology; regulatory networks; systems immunology; gene regulation; evolution

    Competing interests statement: 

    Aviv Regev receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Sloan Foundation. She is on the external advisory board of the San Diego Center for Systems Biology, the FAS Center for Systems Biology at Harvard, the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing, the Jackson Laboratory, the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL), the SciLife Lab in Sweden, and ThermoFisher Scientific. She is on the advisory editorial board of Molecular Systems Biology and is an editorial board member of Genome Biology and Development. Regev is a consultant for Syros Phramaceuticals, GenePeeks, and CTIG (Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Group). Regev also worked for several years in the biotech industry in Israel, where she established and directed a bioinformatics research and development team at QBI, a functional genomics company.

     

  • Patricia Wittkopp

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Patricia Wittkopp received a BS from the University of Michigan, a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and did postdoctoral work at Cornell University. In 2005, she began a faculty position at the University of Michigan, where she is now an Arthur F Thurnau Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and LSA Honors Program. Her research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution of gene expression. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work. She was a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Fellow, an Alfred P Sloan Research Fellow, and a recipient of a March of Dimes Starter Scholar Award.

     

    Keywords

    Evolutionary genetics; evolution and development; gene expression; regulatory networks; allele-specific expression

    Competing interests statement: 

    Patricia Wittkopp has received research support from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, March of Dimes, and the Alfred P Sloan Foundation. She is currently an Associate Editor of Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution, and also serves on the Advisory Editorial Board of Trends in Genetics.

Reviewing editors
  • Nir Ben-Tal
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Structural bioinformatics
    • structure, function and motion in membrane proteins
    • protein interactions
  • Carl T Bergstrom
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Game theory
    • network science
    • evolution
  • Alexander Borst
    Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Visual processing
    • systems neuroscience
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Ronald L Calabrese
    Emory University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Motor pattern generation
    • neuronal and small networks models
    • electrophysiological properties of neurons and synapse
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Leech
  • Ben Cooper
    Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (Thailand)
    Research focus
    • Population biology of communicable diseases
    • antimicrobial resistance
    • epidemiological methods
  • Job Dekker
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Spatial organisation of genomes
    • chromatin interaction networks
  • Michael Doebeli
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modelling
    • evolution of diversity
    • social insects
    • ecology and evolution of microbial communities
  • Sean R Eddy
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational genomics
    • RNA structure
    • homology search algorithms
  • David D Ginty
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurotrophic factors
    • peripheral nervous system development
    • mechanosensory neurons
    • tactile processing
    • spinal cord
  • Mary B Kennedy
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic plasticity
    • synaptic regulation
    • biochemical signal transduction networks
    • systems biology
  • Peter Latham
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • bayesian inference
    • network dynamics
    • neural coding
    • synaptic plasticity
  • Gil McVean
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
  • Andrew Morris
    University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • genetic epidemiology
    • methodological development
    • genome-wide association studies
  • Richard A Neher
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolution of RNA viruses
    • biophysics
  • Yibing Shan
    DE Shaw Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational structural biology
    • signaling
    • computational chemistry
    • molecular dynamics
  • Wenying Shou
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of cooperation and multi-level selection
    • microbial ecology and evolution
    • quantitative experimental biology
    • theoretical biology
  • Klaas Stephan
    University of Zurich and ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Translational neuromodeling
  • M Dawn Teare
    University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tau
    • population genetics
    • epidemiology
  • Alfonso Valencia
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (Spain)
    Research focus
    • Bioinformatics
    • structural bioinformatics
    • evodevo
    • cancer genomics
    • text mining
  • Mark CW van Rossum
    University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • synaptic plasticity
    • noise in neural systems
    • the early visual system
    • retina

Developmental biology & stem cells

Senior editors
  • Fiona Watt

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Fiona Watt is internationally recognised for elucidating the mechanisms that control epidermal stem cell renewal, differentiation and tissue assembly, and discovering how those processes are deregulated in disease. She obtained her DPhil from Oxford University and was a postdoc at MIT. She established her first laboratory at the Kennedy Institute in London and then moved to the Cancer Research UK (CR-UK) London Research Institute (formerly known as the Imperial Cancer Research Fund), where she worked for 20 years. From 2007 to 2012 she was the inaugural Herchel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Cambridge, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research and Deputy Director of the CR-UK Cambridge Research Institute. Since 2012 she has been Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King’s College London. Fiona Watt is a member of EMBO, a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society and an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; stem cell biology; biology cancer cell stem

    Competing interests statement: 

    Fiona Watt receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK and the European Commission. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Expert Review of Dermatology, Cell Stem Cell, StemBook, the Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, and EMBO Molecular Medicine. She is a member of the ‘Faculty of 1000’ online review service (section head, stem cells and regeneration). She is a member of the International Society for Stem Cell Research Board of Directors, a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Canadian Stem Cell Network, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, North East England Stem Cell Institute, Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) of Kyoto University, Fondazione Piemontese per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), Ontario-wide Stem Cell initiative and Centre for Commercialization in Regenerative Medicine, and the Institute of Bioengineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). She is a member of the Wellcome Trust Investigator Awards, expert review group, Cell and Developmental Biology, and a member of the Steering Committee for the UK Stem Cell Bank.

  • Marianne E Bronner

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Marianne Bronner is a developmental biologist with a long-standing interest in specification, migration and differentiation of neural crest stem cells. Using a pan-vertebrate approach, her lab has been systematically studying the gene regulatory network responsible for neural crest formation and evolutionary origin. Born in Budapest, Hungary, Marianne’s family escaped to Austria during the Hungarian revolution when she was a small child.  She received her ScB in Biophysics from Brown University and then a PhD in Biophysics from Johns Hopkins University. She assumed her first faculty position at the University of California, Irvine, before moving to Caltech in 1996.  Marianne received the Conklin Medal from The Society for Developmental Biology in 2013, the Women in Cell Biology Senior Award from the American Society for Cell Biology in 2012, as well as several teaching awards from her institution.  She was elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2015.

     

    Keywords
    Vertebrate development biology; cell lineage; cell migration; vertebrate evolution

    Competing interests statement: 

    Marianne Bronner is employed by the California Institute of Technology and receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health. She is on the board of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and member of several other societies (e.g., Society for Developmental Biology, the American Society for Cell Biology, Society for Neuroscience, International Society for Differentiation). In addition to being a Senior Editor for eLife, she is Editor-in-Chief of Developmental Biology and serves actively as monitoring editor of Journal of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology of the Cell, PLOS Biology and PNAS.  She is presently on the boards of the Sontag Foundation and Curci Foundation as well as the Conference Evaluation Committee of the Gordon Research Conferences.

  • Sean Morrison

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Human biology & medicine

    The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. Dr Morrison obtained his BSc in biology and chemistry from Dalhousie University (1991), then completed a PhD in immunology at Stanford University (1996), and a postdoctoral fellowship in neurobiology at Caltech (1999). From 1999 to 2011, Dr Morrison was at the University of Michigan where he Directed their Center for Stem Cell Biology. Recently, Dr Morrison moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he is the founding Director of the new Children’s Research Institute. Dr Morrison’s laboratory studies the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, as well as the role these mechanisms play in cancer. Dr Morrison was a Searle Scholar (2000–2003), was named in Technology Review Magazine’s list of 100 young innovators (2002), received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2003), the International Society for Hematology and Stem Cell’s McCulloch and Till Award (2007), the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award (2008), and a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Morrison has also been active in public policy issues surrounding stem cells. For example, he has twice testified before Congress and was a leader in the successful “Proposal 2” campaign to protect stem cell research in Michigan’s state constitution.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; tissue stem cells; hematopoietic system

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sean Morrison receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. In addition to being a Senior editor for eLife, he is a member of the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell, the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the EMBO Journal, the Faculty of 1000, Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Cancer Cell, EMBO Reports, and Stem Cell Reports. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the University of Washington Institute for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, the University of California, Los Angeles Broad Stem Cell Research Center, and the Common Fund for the National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine. He is President-Elect of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. He is a co-founder and shareholder in OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, a consultant and shareholder in G1 Therapeutics, a shareholder in Fate Therapeutics, and a consultant for Molecular Devices.

  • K VijayRaghavan

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Genes & chromosomes
    • Neuroscience

    Vijay’s research aims to understand motor- and olfactory- circuit assembly: from deciphering how each component is made, interacts, and stabilises into functioning in the animal to allow behaviour in the real world. Related to the development of network function is its maintenance in the mature animal; another aspect of the work in the laboratory addresses how mature neurons and muscles are maintained. The laboratory uses a genetic approach, mainly using the fruit fly but also collaborating with those using mouse and cell-culture. VijayRaghavan is Secretary to the Government of India in the Ministry of Science and Technology in the Department of Biotechnology. He temporarily holds additional charge of the Department of Biotechnology. VijayRaghavan’s research continues at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Bangalore, India, where he is Distinguished Professor. He studied engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. His doctoral work was at TIFR, Mumbai and postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology. VijayRaghavan is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Foreign Associate of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Keywords

    Developmental biology; neurogenetics; neurobiology; genetic basis of behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    K VijayRaghavan currently receives research support from the Indo–French research agency CEFIPRA, and core support from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). Previous support was from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the Indian Department of Science and Technology (DST), Department of Biotechnology (DBT), CEFIPRA, the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). VijayRaghavan serves on the Board of Governors of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Janelia Farm Research Campus of the HHMI, Chair of the Research Council of the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, and Member of the Governing Council of the National Institute of Immunology. He is Associate Editor of BMC Developmental Biology, and a member of the editorial boards of Development, Seminars in Developmental Biology, and Bioconcepts. He is Chair of the Board of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-CAMP), a not-for-profit company of the National Centre for Biological Sciences and the stem cell institute, inStem, created to manage platform technologies and for technology transfer on the NCBS–inStem campus. He is a member of the board of the Madhuram Narayanan Centre for Exceptional Children, a not-for-profit school for disabled children in Chennai, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Human Frontier Science Program.

     

     

Reviewing editors
  • Julie Ahringer
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell fate
    • gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Utpal Banerjee
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Haematopoiesis
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Clare Blackburn
    MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Thymus development, maintainance, and regeneration
    • thymic epithelial progenitor cell biology and regulation
    • differentiation of pluripotent cells
    • transcription factor networks
  • Margaret Buckingham
    Institut Pasteur (France)
    Research focus
    • Cardiogenesis
    • muscle stem cells
  • Constance Cepko
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • viral vectors
    • retina
    • blindness
  • Philip Cole
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chemical biology
    • signal transduction
    • epigenetics
  • Giulio Cossu
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Stem cells
    • cell therapy
    • muscular dystrophies
    • clinical trials of cell therapies
  • Graeme W Davis
    University of California, San Francisco (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodegeneration
    • neural development
    • synaptic transmission
    • plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Elisabetta Dejana
    FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (Italy)
    Research focus
    • Angiogenesis
    • cell adhesion
    • VE-cadherin
    • vascular permeability
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • endothelium
    • blood brain barrier
  • Suzanne Eaton
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Developmental cell biology
    • tissue mechanics and morphogenesis
    • signaling
    • metabolism
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Reinhard Fässler
    Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • ECM
    • integrin adhesion and signalling
    • Cell biology
    • mouse genetics
  • Elaine Fuchs
    Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Skin stem cells
    • stem cells
    • tissue morphogenesis
    • epithelial polarity
    • transcriptional regulation during development
    • cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion
    • epithelial cancers
  • Fred Gage
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
    Research focus
    • Human stem cells
    • neurogenesis
  • Holger Gerhardt
    Max Delbrück Centre for Molecular Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Vascular development and patterning
    • vascular biology
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
    • Zebrafish
  • David D Ginty
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurotrophic factors
    • peripheral nervous system development
    • mechanosensory neurons
    • tactile processing
    • spinal cord
  • Richard P Harvey
    The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (Australia)
    Experimental organism
    • Mammalian heart
    • congenital heart diseases
    • cardiac regneration
    • cardiac gene regulatory networks
    • cardiac development
    • R. palustris
  • Oliver Hobert
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • MicroRNAs
    • epigenetics
    • developmental neurobiology
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Valerie Horsley
    Yale University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Epithelial stem cells
    • adipocyte stem cells
    • adipose tissue
    • epithelial-mesenchymal interactions
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
    • mechanical regulation of tissues
  • Robb Krumlauf
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Hox genes
    • vertebrate development
    • axial patterning
    • craniofacial development
    • gene regulatory networks
    • developmental neurobiology
  • Cristina Lo Celso
    Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • topoisomerases
    • intravital microscopy
    • hematopoietic system
  • Todd McDevitt
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Biomaterials
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • tissue engineering
  • Helen McNeill
    The Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cell polarity
    • eye movement
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Jeremy Nathans
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • planar cell polarity
    • photoreceptors
    • vision
    • ophthalmology
  • Roel Nusse
    Stanford School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • wnt signaling
    • stem cells
    • tissue repair
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
  • Jeremy Reiter
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cilia
  • Elizabeth Robertson
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional regulators
    • mammalian development
  • Lee L Rubin
    Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Spinal muscular atrophy
    • amyloid
    • Huntington's disease
    • reprogramming
  • Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Regeneration
    Experimental organism
    • P. aeruginosa
  • Allan Spradling
    Carnegie Institution for Science (United States)
    Research focus
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • ovary
    • female reproduction
    • polyploid cell
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Deepak Srivastava
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Tissue stem cells
    • cardiac repair
    • cardiology
  • Didier Y R Stainier
    Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Developmental genetics
    • Organogenesis
    • Tissue morphogenesis
    • Organ homeostasis
    Experimental organism
    • Zebrafish
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • In vitro models of development and disease
    • Phenotypic variation
    • bone disease
    • tissue engineering
  • Amy J Wagers
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Blood-forming stem cells
    • muscle-forming stem cells
  • Tanya T Whitfield
    University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Animal models of human genetic disease
    • deafness
    • inner ear
    • sensory placodes
    Experimental organism
    • Zebrafish
  • Jerry L Workman
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein complexes
    • chromatin modification
    • regulation of gene transcription
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Yukiko M Yamashita
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan (United States)
    Research focus
    • Stem cells
    • stem cell niche
    • asymmetric division
    • spindle orientation
    • centrosome
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Hong Zhang
    Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Autophagy
    • lysosome
    • membrane contact
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans

Ecology

Senior editors
  • Ian Baldwin

    Expertise: 
    • Ecology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Ian Baldwin studied biology and chemistry at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and graduated 1981 with an AB. In 1989, he received a PhD in Chemical Ecology from Cornell University, in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. He was an Assistant (1989), Associate (1993) and Full Professor (1996) in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. In 1996 he became the Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, where he now heads of the Department of Molecular Ecology. In 1999 he was appointed Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. In 2002 he founded the International Max Planck Research School at the Max Planck Institute in Jena. Baldwin's scientific work is devoted to understanding the traits that allow plants to survive in the real world. To achieve this, he has developed a molecular toolbox for the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) and a graduate program that trains “genome-enabled field biologists” to combine genomic and molecular genetic tools with field work to understand the genes that matter for plant-herbivore, -pollinator, -plant, -microbial interactions under real-world conditions. He has also been driver behind the open-access publication efforts of the Max Planck Society.

    Major subject area(s)

    Plant biology; evolution and ecology; secondary metabolism; organismic level gene function

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ian Baldwin has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the US National Science Foundation, the AW Mellon Foundation, the European Research Council, and the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization. He currently serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Integrated Plant Biology; and previously, Oecologia, Ecological Studies Series, Chemoecology, and The Plant Journal. He serves on the advisory boards of the Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Lytle Preserve, Brigham Young University, and more MPG programs than can be listed; and previously, the Institute of the Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Jülich, the Minerva Center for Arid Ecosystems Research, Hebrew University, the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, the Swiss NSF Priority Program "Plant Survival in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems”, and the DFG Priority Programs "Biological radiations" and "Trophic interactions and dynamics of communities".

Reviewing editors
  • Carl T Bergstrom
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Game theory
    • network science
    • evolution
  • Jörg Bohlmann
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Metabolism
    • chemical ecology
    • plant genomics
    Experimental organism
    • Plants
  • Jon Clardy
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbial secondary metabolism
    • chemical communications
    • biosensors
    • chemical biology
    • microbial ecology and evolution
  • Iain D Couzin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Bird flocks
    • fish schools
    • insect swarms
    • consensus decision-making
    • collective behavior
    • evolution of migration
  • Marcel Dicke
    Wageningen University (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Ecological entomology
    • plant–insect interactions
  • Paul G Falkowski
    Rutgers University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Coral biology
    • biogeochemical cycles
    • biological oceanography
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • physiological adaptation
    • symbiosis
  • Maria J Harrison
    Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe symbioses
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant mineral nutrition
    Experimental organism
    • Glomus
    • Medicago
  • Merijn R Kant
    University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Chemical ecology
    • plant defense
    • plant--parasite interactions
    Experimental organism
    • Tomato
    • insects
    • mites
  • Laurent Keller
    University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Ecology
    • evolutionary genetics
    • social insects
  • Daniel J Kliebenstein
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe interactions
    • quantitative biology
    • genome-wide association studies
    • plant genomics
    • ecological genomics
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • secondary metabolism
    • plant–insect interactions
  • David Lentink
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Comparative biomechanics of flight
    Experimental organism
    • birds
    • insects
    • bats
    • plant seeds
  • George H Perry
    Pennsylvania State University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Human evolution
    • Primates
    • Paleogenomics
    • Evolutionary and ecological genomics
  • Christian Rutz
    University of St Andrews (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Evolutionary ecology
    • Ecology
    • Animal tool use
    • Animal culture
    • Animal tracking (bio-logging/bio-telemetry)
    • Ornithology
    • Corvids
  • Wenying Shou
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of cooperation and multi-level selection
    • microbial ecology and evolution
    • quantitative experimental biology
    • theoretical biology

Epidemiology & global health

Senior editors
  • Prabhat Jha

    Expertise: 
    • Epidemiology & global health
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Prabhat Jha has been a key figure in epidemiology and economics of global health for the past decade. He is the University of Toronto Endowed Professor in Disease Control and Canada Research Chair at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the founding Director of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Professor Jha is a lead investigator of the Million Death Study in India, which quantifies the causes of premature mortality in over one million homes from 19972014 and which examines the contribution of key risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, diet, and environmental exposures. He is co-investigator of the Disease Control Priorities Network and the author of several influential books on tobacco control, including two that helped enable a global treaty on tobacco control, now signed by over 160 countries. Prior to founding CGHR, Professor Jha served as Senior Scientist for the World Health Organization, where he co-led the work on health and poverty for the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health. Earlier, he headed the World Bank team responsible for developing the Second National HIV/AIDS Control Program in India. His advisory work has included the Government of South Africa on its national health insurance plan, and the United States Institute of Medicine on global health. Notable recognitions include the Order of Canada (2013) for contributions to global health, the  Luther Terry Award for Research on Tobacco Control (2012), The Globe and Mail 25 Transformational Canadians (2010), Top 40 Canadians under Age 40 Award (2004), the Ontario Premier’s Research Excellence Award (2004), and Gold Medal from the Poland Health Promotion Foundation (2000). Professor Jha holds an MD from the University of Manitoba and a DPhil from Oxford University, where he studied as a Canadian Rhodes Scholar.

    Keywords

    Epidemiology; global health; infectious disease and population dynamics; randomized controlled trials

    Competing interests statement: 

    Prabhat Jha has received funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Canadian International Development Research Agency, Canadian International Development Agency, the International Science and Technology Program of the Canadian government, and the US National Institutes of Health. He serves on the editorial board of Demography India. He advises several agencies and the Canadian government on epidemiology, disease control strategies, and tobacco control, and serves on the advisory board of the UK Biobank.

Reviewing editors
  • Quarraisha Abdool Karim
    CAPRISA (South Africa)
    Research focus
    • HIV/AIDS
    • women and adolescent health
    • tuberculosis
  • Ben Cooper
    Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (Thailand)
    Research focus
    • Population biology of communicable diseases
    • antimicrobial resistance
    • epidemiological methods
  • Eduardo Franco
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Human biology and medicine
    • microbiology and infectious disease
    • cancer epidemiology and prevention
    • screening
    • human papillomavirus infection
  • Simon I Hay
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Infectious diseases of the tropics
    • epidemiology
    Experimental organism
    • Plasmodia
    • Leishmania
    • viruses
  • Mark Jit
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Public Health England (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Immunisation
    • health economics
    • mathematical modelling of infectious diseases
  • Urszula Krzych
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Malaria
    • adaptive immunity
    • vaccines
  • Catherine Kyobutungi
    Africa Population Health Research Center (Kenya)
    Research focus
    • Epidemiology of non-communicable diseases
  • Marc Lipsitch
    Harvard School of Public Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modeling
    • evolution of pathogens
    • epidemiology of infectious diseases
    Experimental organism
    • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Ruth Loos
    The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States)
    Research focus
    • epidemiology
    • obesity and cardiometabolic traits
  • M Dawn Teare
    University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tau
    • population genetics
    • epidemiology

Genes & chromosomes

Senior editors
  • James Manley

    Expertise: 
    • Genes & chromosomes

    James Manley received a BS from Columbia University, a PhD from Stony Brook/Cold Spring Harbor Labs, and did postdoctoral work at MIT. He has been in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University since 1980, was Chair from 1995–2001, and Julian Clarence Levi Professor of Life Sciences since 1995. His research interests center on understanding the mechanisms and regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, especially with regard to mRNA splicing and 3’ end formation; how these processes are linked to transcription, cell signaling pathways, and maintenance of genomic stability; and how they contribute to cell differentiation and disease. He has authored or coauthored nearly 300 research articles and reviews on these topics, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. Dr. Manley is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Keywords

    Transcription; RNA processing; translation; RNA localization and turnover

    Competing interests statement: 

    Jim Manley receives research support from the National Institutes of Health and Columbia’s Motor Neuron Center. He is currently an Associate Editor of Gene Expression and Editor of Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is also on the editorial boards of Genes and Development, RNA, Molecular Cell, BMC Molecular Biology, BMC Biology, Recent Patents on DNA & Gene Sequences, and Transcription.

     

  • Kevin Struhl

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Kevin Struhl received a BS and MS from MIT, a PhD from Stanford University Medical School, and did postdoctoral work at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. He has been in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School since 1982, was acting Chair from 1997–98, and has been the David Wesley Gaiser Professor since 1991. His research combines genetic, molecular, genomic, and evolutionary approaches to address a wide variety of fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structure in yeast. In addition, he is interested in elucidating transcriptional regulatory circuits that mediate the process of cellular transformation and the formation of cancer stem cells. He has authored or co-authored nearly 300 research articles and reviews, and is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He received the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and is a Distinguished Researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in Crete. Dr. Struhl is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Medicine.

    Keywords

    Transcription mechanisms; gene regulation; chromatin; mRNA decay; biological function; cellular transformation; cancer stem cells

  • Jessica Tyler

    Expertise: 
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Jessica Tyler was born in England in 1969. After graduating from the University of Sheffield with a Bachelors degree and the Hans Krebs Prize in Biochemistry, she performed her PhD studies at the MRC Virology Unit in Glasgow, Scotland. During her postdoctoral studies with Dr James Kadonaga at the University of California, San Diego, she identified the key chromatin assembly factors Anti-silencing Function 1 (Asf1) and characterized Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) from Drosophila. In 2000, Dr Tyler started her first faculty position in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, USA. In the next 10 years, Dr Tyler revealed that chromatin assembly and disassembly not only regulates S phase events, but also gene expression and the DNA damage response. Dr Tyler was a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar and was awarded the Charlotte Friend Woman in Cancer Research Award for 2009 from the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR). Having risen rapidly to the rank of full professor at the University of Colorado, Dr Tyler moved in 2010 to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Her recent work has extended to the broader influence of chromatin assembly on mitosis, aging and cancer. She is now in the Department of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis, where she co-directs the Center for Cancer Epigenetics and holds the Edward Rotan Distinguished Professorship in Cancer Research. Her most proud achievement is being mother to 11 year-old triplets. In November 2015, she became a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York.


    Keywords

    Epigenetic regulation; chromatin; gene expression; mitosis; aging; cancer

  • K VijayRaghavan

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Genes & chromosomes
    • Neuroscience

    Vijay’s research aims to understand motor- and olfactory- circuit assembly: from deciphering how each component is made, interacts, and stabilises into functioning in the animal to allow behaviour in the real world. Related to the development of network function is its maintenance in the mature animal; another aspect of the work in the laboratory addresses how mature neurons and muscles are maintained. The laboratory uses a genetic approach, mainly using the fruit fly but also collaborating with those using mouse and cell-culture. VijayRaghavan is Secretary to the Government of India in the Ministry of Science and Technology in the Department of Biotechnology. He temporarily holds additional charge of the Department of Biotechnology. VijayRaghavan’s research continues at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Bangalore, India, where he is Distinguished Professor. He studied engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. His doctoral work was at TIFR, Mumbai and postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology. VijayRaghavan is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Foreign Associate of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Keywords

    Developmental biology; neurogenetics; neurobiology; genetic basis of behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    K VijayRaghavan currently receives research support from the Indo–French research agency CEFIPRA, and core support from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). Previous support was from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the Indian Department of Science and Technology (DST), Department of Biotechnology (DBT), CEFIPRA, the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). VijayRaghavan serves on the Board of Governors of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Janelia Farm Research Campus of the HHMI, Chair of the Research Council of the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, and Member of the Governing Council of the National Institute of Immunology. He is Associate Editor of BMC Developmental Biology, and a member of the editorial boards of Development, Seminars in Developmental Biology, and Bioconcepts. He is Chair of the Board of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-CAMP), a not-for-profit company of the National Centre for Biological Sciences and the stem cell institute, inStem, created to manage platform technologies and for technology transfer on the NCBS–inStem campus. He is a member of the board of the Madhuram Narayanan Centre for Exceptional Children, a not-for-profit school for disabled children in Chennai, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Human Frontier Science Program.

     

     

Reviewing editors
  • Karen Adelman
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin structure
    • gene expression
    • transcription
  • Andres Aguilera
    University of Seville (Spain)
    Research focus
    • Genome instability
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • R loops
    • transcription-replication conflicts
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Julie Ahringer
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell fate
    • gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Asifa Akhtar
    Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Richard Amasino
    University of Wisconsin (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Brachypodium distachyon
  • David Baulcombe
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • RNA silencing
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Douglas L Black
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pre-mRNA splicing
    • post-transcriptional gene regulation
  • Benjamin J Blencowe
    University of Toronto (Canada)
    Research focus
    • RNA processing
    • epigenomics
    • transcriptome analyses
  • Michael R Botchan
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA replication
    • DNA repair
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Irwin Davidson
    Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/UDS (France)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • chromatin
    • cancer
  • Roger Davis
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
  • Bernard de Massy
    Institute of Human Genetics, CNRS (France)
    Research focus
    • Recombination
    • meiosis
  • Job Dekker
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Spatial organisation of genomes
    • chromatin interaction networks
  • Thomas Gingeras
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (United States)
    Research focus
    • Noncoding RNA
    • genome organisation
    • transcriptome analyses
    • DNA sequencing methods
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Christopher Glass
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • transcription
    • transcriptional genomics
    • macrophage biology
    • inflammation
  • Michael R Green
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • RNA splicing
    • cancer molecular biology
  • Rachel Green
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mechanism of translation (bacterial and eukaryotic)
    • ribosome profiling
    • mRNA decay
    • translational control
    • ribosomes
  • Carol Greider
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Telomeres
  • Edith Heard
    Institut Curie (France)
    Research focus
    • X-chromosome inactivation
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • nuclear organisation
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Alan G Hinnebusch
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein synthesis
    • translational control
  • Torben Heick Jensen
    Aarhus University (Denmark)
    Research focus
    • RNA turnover
    • RNA processing
    • gene expression
    • transcription
  • Katherine Jones
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional mechanisms
    • transcription mechanisms
    • HIV gene expression
    • APC / regulation of expression of growth control genes
  • Stephen C Kowalczykowski
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • membrane contact
    • recombinational DNA repair
    • single-molecule biophysics
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Leonid Kruglyak
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Phenotypic variation
    • genetics of global gene expression
    • population genetics
    • Complex diseases
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Jeannie T Lee
    Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Noncoding RNA
    • X-chromosome inactivation
    • imprinting
    • epigenetics
    • chromatin
  • Gail Mandel
    Oregon Health and Science University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neuronal gene expression
    • astrocyte biology
  • Andrew Morris
    University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • genetic epidemiology
    • methodological development
    • genome-wide association studies
  • Andrea Musacchio
    Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Kinetochore
    • cell cycle
    • centromere
  • Timothy Nilsen
    Case Western Reserve University (United States)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • mechanism of miRNA function
    • RNA–protein interactions
    • mRNP composition and function
    • RNA biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Nick J Proudfoot
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • mRNA processing
    • transcription
  • Danny Reinberg
    New York University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • chromatin biology
    • chromatin
    • histones
    • transcription
  • Bing Ren
    University of California, San Diego School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • epigenomics
  • Ali Shilatifard
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin
    • ELLs
    • P-TEFb
    • Pol II
    • MLLs
    • chromosomal translocations and leukemia
    • enhancers
    • gene expression
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Robert H Singer
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • mRNA localization
  • Nahum Sonenberg
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Protein synthesis
    • cell signalling and translation
    • translational control of memory
  • Allan Spradling
    Carnegie Institution for Science (United States)
    Research focus
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • ovary
    • female reproduction
    • polyploid cell
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Jonathan P Staley
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Catalysis
    • proofreading
    • RNA dynamics
  • Gisela Storz
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (United States)
    Research focus
    • Small noncoding RNAs
    • oxidative stress
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Juan Valcárcel
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (Spain)
    Research focus
    • RNA processing
    • gene regulation
  • Cynthia Wolberger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • X-ray crystallography
    • enzymology
    • transcriptional regulation
    • ubiquitin signaling
  • Jerry L Workman
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein complexes
    • chromatin modification
    • regulation of gene transcription
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Daniel Zilberman
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • epigenomics
    • evolution
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana

Genomics & evolutionary biology

Senior editors
  • Detlef Weigel

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Detlef Weigel received his PhD in 1988 from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. After postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty of the Salk Institute in 1993. Since 2002, he has been director of the Department of Molecular Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. His current research interests focus on natural genetic variation and evolutionary genomics of plants. Examples of recent important projects are the 1001 Genomes project for Arabidopsis thaliana, and the systematic dissection of deleterious epistasis between Arabidopsis strains due to autoimmunity. Among the awards he has received are the Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Otto Bayer Award. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society.

    Keywords

    Natural variation; epigenetics; evolutionary genomics; plant biology; genomics; evolutionary biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Detlef Weigel has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the Foundation of the State of Baden-Württemberg, the German Ministry for Education and Research, the European Commission, the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization, and several US Federal agencies. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology and Genome Biology. He is Chair of EMBO Council, and is serving or has recently served on the Advisory Boards of the Epigenomics of Plants International Consortium, Bayer Crop Science, The Arabidopsis Information Resource, Flanders Institute of Biotechnology, Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, and the Sainsbury Laboratory. He is a co-founder of Computomics and CeMet.

  • Ian Baldwin

    Expertise: 
    • Ecology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Ian Baldwin studied biology and chemistry at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and graduated 1981 with an AB. In 1989, he received a PhD in Chemical Ecology from Cornell University, in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. He was an Assistant (1989), Associate (1993) and Full Professor (1996) in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. In 1996 he became the Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, where he now heads of the Department of Molecular Ecology. In 1999 he was appointed Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. In 2002 he founded the International Max Planck Research School at the Max Planck Institute in Jena. Baldwin's scientific work is devoted to understanding the traits that allow plants to survive in the real world. To achieve this, he has developed a molecular toolbox for the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) and a graduate program that trains “genome-enabled field biologists” to combine genomic and molecular genetic tools with field work to understand the genes that matter for plant-herbivore, -pollinator, -plant, -microbial interactions under real-world conditions. He has also been driver behind the open-access publication efforts of the Max Planck Society.

    Major subject area(s)

    Plant biology; evolution and ecology; secondary metabolism; organismic level gene function

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ian Baldwin has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the US National Science Foundation, the AW Mellon Foundation, the European Research Council, and the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization. He currently serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Integrated Plant Biology; and previously, Oecologia, Ecological Studies Series, Chemoecology, and The Plant Journal. He serves on the advisory boards of the Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Lytle Preserve, Brigham Young University, and more MPG programs than can be listed; and previously, the Institute of the Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Jülich, the Minerva Center for Arid Ecosystems Research, Hebrew University, the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, the Swiss NSF Priority Program "Plant Survival in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems”, and the DFG Priority Programs "Biological radiations" and "Trophic interactions and dynamics of communities".

  • Mark McCarthy

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Mark McCarthy is the Robert Turner Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Oxford, based at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. He is also a Consultant Physician at the Oxford University Hospitals Trust and is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Geneva. Following medical training in Cambridge and London, a spell as an MRC Travelling Fellow at the Whitehead Institute in Massachusetts, and 8 years at Imperial College, he moved to Oxford in 2002. He is a physician-scientist and human geneticist interested in the biological basis of complex disease. His research group is focused on the identification and characterisation of genetic variants influencing risk of type 2 diabetes and related traits, and on using those discoveries to drive biological inference and translational opportunities. He works closely with colleagues in Oxford and beyond to establish the mechanisms whereby T2D-risk variants influence islet function, and to explore the value of this information to drive clinical advances. He has played a major role in establishing and leading a number of the global initiatives in this field including the DIAGRAM, MAGIC, GIANT, EGG, GoT2D, ENGAGE, and T2D-GENES consortia. He has been a Senior Editor at eLife since 2015.

    Keywords

    Human genetics and genomics; multifactorial disease; metabolic disease; biomarkers

    Competing interests statement: 

    Mark McCarthy has received funding from the UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Diabetes UK, British Heart Foundation, the (UK) National Institute for Health Research, the (US) National Institutes of Health, the European Commission, the Foundation of the NIH, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and from the Innovative Medicines Initiative. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards (or equivalent advisory committees) for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (Human Genetics), the H3A Bionet, and Genome Quebec. He is a member of the MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board and Cross Board Cohort Advisory Group. He has, via the IMI, received research funding, and/or has research collaborations with multiple pharma companies including Pfizer, Lilly, Sanofi-Aventis, NovoNordisk, and Boehringer Ingelheim.

  • Aviv Regev

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Aviv Regev is a computational biologist who joined the Broad Institute as a core member and MIT as a faculty member in 2006. Her work investigates how complex molecular networks function and evolve in the face of genetic and environmental changes, over time-scales ranging from minutes to millions of years. Regev received her MSc from Tel Aviv University, studying biology, computer science, and mathematics in the Interdisciplinary Program for the Fostering of Excellence, where she undertook research in both theoretical and experimental biology. She received her PhD in computational biology from Tel Aviv University. Prior to joining the Broad Institute, Regev was a fellow at the Bauer Center for Genomics Research at Harvard University, where she developed new approaches to the reconstruction of regulatory networks and modules from genomic data. Regev is also an associate professor in the Department of Biology at MIT
and director of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad. Regev is the Director of the Cell Circuits Program at the Broad and a lead principal investigator for the Center for Cell Circuits at the Broad Institute, a Center of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS). Regev has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist since 2009, and was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in 2013. She is a recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, a Sloan fellowship from the Sloan Foundation, the Overton Prize from the International Society for Computational Biology, and the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).

    (Image Credit: Maria Nemchuk)

    Keywords

    Computational biology; single cell genomics; systems biology; regulatory networks; systems immunology; gene regulation; evolution

    Competing interests statement: 

    Aviv Regev receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Sloan Foundation. She is on the external advisory board of the San Diego Center for Systems Biology, the FAS Center for Systems Biology at Harvard, the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing, the Jackson Laboratory, the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL), the SciLife Lab in Sweden, and ThermoFisher Scientific. She is on the advisory editorial board of Molecular Systems Biology and is an editorial board member of Genome Biology and Development. Regev is a consultant for Syros Phramaceuticals, GenePeeks, and CTIG (Cancer Therapeutics Innovation Group). Regev also worked for several years in the biotech industry in Israel, where she established and directed a bioinformatics research and development team at QBI, a functional genomics company.

     

  • Patricia Wittkopp

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Patricia Wittkopp received a BS from the University of Michigan, a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and did postdoctoral work at Cornell University. In 2005, she began a faculty position at the University of Michigan, where she is now an Arthur F Thurnau Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and LSA Honors Program. Her research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution of gene expression. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work. She was a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Fellow, an Alfred P Sloan Research Fellow, and a recipient of a March of Dimes Starter Scholar Award.

     

    Keywords

    Evolutionary genetics; evolution and development; gene expression; regulatory networks; allele-specific expression

    Competing interests statement: 

    Patricia Wittkopp has received research support from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, March of Dimes, and the Alfred P Sloan Foundation. She is currently an Associate Editor of Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution, and also serves on the Advisory Editorial Board of Trends in Genetics.

Reviewing editors
  • Julie Ahringer
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Cell fate
    • gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Asifa Akhtar
    Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Gene expression
    • chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • transcription
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Richard Amasino
    University of Wisconsin (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Brachypodium distachyon
  • David Baulcombe
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • RNA silencing
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Carl T Bergstrom
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Game theory
    • network science
    • evolution
  • Benjamin J Blencowe
    University of Toronto (Canada)
    Research focus
    • RNA processing
    • epigenomics
    • transcriptome analyses
  • Jörg Bohlmann
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Metabolism
    • chemical ecology
    • plant genomics
    Experimental organism
    • Plants
  • Iain D Couzin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Bird flocks
    • fish schools
    • insect swarms
    • consensus decision-making
    • collective behavior
    • evolution of migration
  • Marcel Dicke
    Wageningen University (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Ecological entomology
    • plant–insect interactions
  • Michael Doebeli
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modelling
    • evolution of diversity
    • social insects
    • ecology and evolution of microbial communities
  • Jonathan Flint
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genetics
    • psychiatric disorders
  • Thomas Gingeras
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (United States)
    Research focus
    • Noncoding RNA
    • genome organisation
    • transcriptome analyses
    • DNA sequencing methods
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Merijn R Kant
    University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Chemical ecology
    • plant defense
    • plant--parasite interactions
    Experimental organism
    • Tomato
    • insects
    • mites
  • Laurent Keller
    University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Ecology
    • evolutionary genetics
    • social insects
  • Daniel J Kliebenstein
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe interactions
    • quantitative biology
    • genome-wide association studies
    • plant genomics
    • ecological genomics
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • secondary metabolism
    • plant–insect interactions
  • David Lentink
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Comparative biomechanics of flight
    Experimental organism
    • birds
    • insects
    • bats
    • plant seeds
  • Gil McVean
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
  • Andrew Morris
    University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • genetic epidemiology
    • methodological development
    • genome-wide association studies
  • Richard A Neher
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolution of RNA viruses
    • biophysics
  • Sacha B Nelson
    Brandeis University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genome-wide gene expression in the nervous system
    • cellular and systems neurophysiology
    • forebrain development and function
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Other mammals
  • Magnus Nordborg
    Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)
    Research focus
    • Adaptation
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
    • Molecular genetics
  • Duncan T Odom
    University of Cambridge / Cancer Research UK (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Transcription
    • transcriptional regulation
    • gene expression
    • evolution
    • genetics
  • George H Perry
    Pennsylvania State University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Human evolution
    • Primates
    • Paleogenomics
    • Evolutionary and ecological genomics
  • Joseph K Pickrell
    New York Genome Center & Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Statistical genetics
    • population genetics
  • Molly Przeworski
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolutionary biology
    • recombination
    Experimental organism
    • Primates
  • Wenying Shou
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of cooperation and multi-level selection
    • microbial ecology and evolution
    • quantitative experimental biology
    • theoretical biology
  • Oliver Weichenrieder
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Retrotransposition
    • regulatory mRNA
    • x-ray crystallography
    • structural biology
  • Jerry L Workman
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Protein complexes
    • chromatin modification
    • regulation of gene transcription
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Hao Yu
    National University of Singapore & Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • functional microscopy
    • plant reproductive development
    • phytohormone signalling
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Orchid
  • Daniel Zilberman
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • epigenomics
    • evolution
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana

Human biology & medicine

Senior editors
  • Harry Dietz

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine

    Dr Dietz is Victor A McKusick Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Molecular Biology & Genetics in the Institute of Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    His undergraduate training in biomedical engineering was performed at Duke University and his MD degree was received from the Health Sciences University of Syracuse.  Clinical and research training in pediatrics, pediatric cardiology, and genetics occurred at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 

    Dr Dietz’s research is focused on elucidation of the etiology and pathogenesis of connective tissue disorders that involve the cardiovascular system.  

    Dr Dietz has received multiple prestigious awards including the Curt Stern Award from the American Society of Human Genetics, the Taubman Prize for excellence in translational medical science, and the Harrington Prize from the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Harrington Discovery Institute. He is an inductee of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Academy of American Physicians, The National Academy of Medicine, Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Sciences.

    Keywords

    Human genetics; extracellular matrix; connective tissue disorders; genetics of cardiovascular disease

    Competing interests statement: 

    Hal Dietz receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Heath, Leducq Foundation, Marfan Foundation, and Scleroderma Research Foundation.  He currently serves on the editorial board of Science Translation Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He serves on the advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline, is founder and consultant for Blade Therapeutics, and also consults for Eli Lilly and Bristol-Myers Squibb. He is President Elect of the American Society of Human Genetics.

  • Mark McCarthy

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Mark McCarthy is the Robert Turner Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Oxford, based at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. He is also a Consultant Physician at the Oxford University Hospitals Trust and is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Geneva. Following medical training in Cambridge and London, a spell as an MRC Travelling Fellow at the Whitehead Institute in Massachusetts, and 8 years at Imperial College, he moved to Oxford in 2002. He is a physician-scientist and human geneticist interested in the biological basis of complex disease. His research group is focused on the identification and characterisation of genetic variants influencing risk of type 2 diabetes and related traits, and on using those discoveries to drive biological inference and translational opportunities. He works closely with colleagues in Oxford and beyond to establish the mechanisms whereby T2D-risk variants influence islet function, and to explore the value of this information to drive clinical advances. He has played a major role in establishing and leading a number of the global initiatives in this field including the DIAGRAM, MAGIC, GIANT, EGG, GoT2D, ENGAGE, and T2D-GENES consortia. He has been a Senior Editor at eLife since 2015.

    Keywords

    Human genetics and genomics; multifactorial disease; metabolic disease; biomarkers

    Competing interests statement: 

    Mark McCarthy has received funding from the UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Diabetes UK, British Heart Foundation, the (UK) National Institute for Health Research, the (US) National Institutes of Health, the European Commission, the Foundation of the NIH, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and from the Innovative Medicines Initiative. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards (or equivalent advisory committees) for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (Human Genetics), the H3A Bionet, and Genome Quebec. He is a member of the MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board and Cross Board Cohort Advisory Group. He has, via the IMI, received research funding, and/or has research collaborations with multiple pharma companies including Pfizer, Lilly, Sanofi-Aventis, NovoNordisk, and Boehringer Ingelheim.

  • Sean Morrison

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Human biology & medicine

    The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. Dr Morrison obtained his BSc in biology and chemistry from Dalhousie University (1991), then completed a PhD in immunology at Stanford University (1996), and a postdoctoral fellowship in neurobiology at Caltech (1999). From 1999 to 2011, Dr Morrison was at the University of Michigan where he Directed their Center for Stem Cell Biology. Recently, Dr Morrison moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he is the founding Director of the new Children’s Research Institute. Dr Morrison’s laboratory studies the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal and stem cell aging, as well as the role these mechanisms play in cancer. Dr Morrison was a Searle Scholar (2000–2003), was named in Technology Review Magazine’s list of 100 young innovators (2002), received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2003), the International Society for Hematology and Stem Cell’s McCulloch and Till Award (2007), the American Association of Anatomists Harland Mossman Award (2008), and a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Morrison has also been active in public policy issues surrounding stem cells. For example, he has twice testified before Congress and was a leader in the successful “Proposal 2” campaign to protect stem cell research in Michigan’s state constitution.

    Keywords
    Cancer biology; tissue stem cells; hematopoietic system

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sean Morrison receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. In addition to being a Senior editor for eLife, he is a member of the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell, the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the EMBO Journal, the Faculty of 1000, Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Cancer Cell, EMBO Reports, and Stem Cell Reports. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the University of Washington Institute for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, the University of California, Los Angeles Broad Stem Cell Research Center, and the Common Fund for the National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine. He is President-Elect of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. He is a co-founder and shareholder in OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, a consultant and shareholder in G1 Therapeutics, a shareholder in Fate Therapeutics, and a consultant for Molecular Devices.

  • Charles Sawyers

    Expertise: 
    • Cancer biology
    • Human biology & medicine

    Charles Sawyers is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His studies of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase function in chronic myeloid leukemia, in collaboration with Brian Druker and Novartis, led to the development of the kinase inhibitor imatinib as primary therapy for CML. This was followed by his discovery that BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations confer imatinib resistance, and development of the second generation Abl kinase inhibitor dasatinib, in collaboration with Bristol Myers Squibb. Sawyers' current work in prostate cancer resulted in the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (MDV3100), discovered in collaboration with University of California, Los Angeles chemist Michael Jung, which received FDA approval in 2012. Sawyers is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and co-recipient of the 2009 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.

    Keywords
    Oncology; translational medicine

    Competing interests statement: 

    Charles Sawyers receives research funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. He is President Elect of the American Association of Cancer Research and will serve as President from 201314. He is a Councilor of the American Association of Physicians (until 2017) and serves on the editorial boards of Cell and Cancer Cell, and as a scientific advisor to Agios, Aragon, Aveo, Housey Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Nextech, Pfizer, and Tracon.

     

  • Gary Westbrook

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine
    • Neuroscience

    Gary Westbrook is a Senior Scientist and Co-Director of the Vollum Institute and Rocky and Julie Dixon Professor of Neurology at Oregon Health and Science University. Dr Westbrook is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Neuroscience. He has received Javits and Merit awards from NIH for his research as well as an International Cooperation Award from the Max Planck Society. Dr Westbrook received his medical training and did graduate study in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, followed by residencies in Internal Medicine and Neurology, and basic neuroscience research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Earlier work in his lab was mostly directed at the level of receptors, particularly N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the function of single synapses. The emphasis has now largely shifted to studies of small networks (microcircuits) in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Dr Westbrook maintains interests in clinical neurology, particularly epilepsy, as well as graduate research training – he currently serves as the director of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vollum/OHSU.

    Keywords

    Neuroscience; synaptic transmission; brain microcircuits; neurological diseases

    Competing interests statement: 

    Gary Westbrook is employed by Oregon Health and Science University. He receives research and training funding from the National Institutes of Health and the Ellison Medical Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He serves on Scientific Advisory Boards for Max Planck Institutes in Göttingen (MPIEM) and Florida (MPFI), the Myelin Repair Foundation, and on study sections for the National Institutes of Health. He is currently a member of editorial boards for Physiological Reviews and Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Reviewing editors
  • Kari Alitalo
    University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • oncogenes
    • angiogenesis
    • vascular biology
  • Scott A Armstrong
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Pediatric leukemia
    • cancer biology
  • Utpal Banerjee
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Haematopoiesis
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Giulio Cossu
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Stem cells
    • cell therapy
    • muscular dystrophies
    • clinical trials of cell therapies
  • Michael Czech
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Insulin
    • metabolism
    • lipid-protein interactions
    • signal transduction
    • membranes
    • adipose
    • obesity
    • insulin resistance
    • diabetes
  • Chi V Dang
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
  • Ralph J DeBerardinis
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer
    • metabolism
    • medicine
    • genetics
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • mouse
  • Tonu Esko
    University of Tartu (Estonia)
    Research focus
    • Complex diseases
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Joaquin Espinosa
    University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Apoptosis
    • p53
    • tumor suppressors
    • cancer biology
  • Jonathan Flint
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genetics
    • psychiatric disorders
  • Eduardo Franco
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Human biology and medicine
    • microbiology and infectious disease
    • cancer epidemiology and prevention
    • screening
    • human papillomavirus infection
  • Elaine Fuchs
    Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Skin stem cells
    • stem cells
    • tissue morphogenesis
    • epithelial polarity
    • transcriptional regulation during development
    • cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion
    • epithelial cancers
  • Richard J Gilbertson
    Cambridge Cancer Center (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tumor biology
    • cancer stem cells
  • David Ginsburg
    University of Michigan (United States)
    Research focus
    • genetics of global gene expression
    • mouse models of human disease
    • haematology
  • Joseph G Gleeson
    The Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disease
    • brain development
  • Michael R Green
    University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • RNA splicing
    • cancer molecular biology
  • Helen Hobbs
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipid metabolism
    • cholesterol
    • human genetics
    • histones
  • Johanna Ivaska
    University of Turku (Finland)
    Research focus
    • Integrins
    • addiction
    • migration
    • invasion
    • cancer
    • endosomal traffic
  • Eunjoon Kim
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (South Korea)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disorders
    • synapse development and plasticity
    • synaptic transmission
  • Ruth Loos
    The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States)
    Research focus
    • epidemiology
    • obesity and cardiometabolic traits
  • Joan Massagué
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • signaling
    • cell fate
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • metastasis
    Experimental organism
    • Human tissue
  • Todd McDevitt
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Biomaterials
    • stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis
    • tissue engineering
  • Duojia Pan
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • growth control
    • cancer biology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Suzanne R Pfeffer
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane traffic
    • Complex diseases
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
    • secretory pathway
    • endosomes
    • lysosomes
  • Jeffrey Settleman
    Calico Labs (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cancer biology
    • signal transduction
    • tumor heterogeneity
    • signaling
    • epigenetics
  • Dominique Soldati-Favre
    University of Geneva (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Host-parasite interactions
    • apicomplexa biology
    • motility
    Experimental organism
    • Toxoplasma gondii
    • Plasmodium
  • Deepak Srivastava
    Gladstone Institutes (United States)
    Research focus
    • Tissue stem cells
    • cardiac repair
    • cardiology
  • Peter Tontonoz
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • lipid metabolism
    • obesity/diabetes
    • histones
  • Jos WM van der Meer
    Radboud University Medical Centre (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Infectious disease and host defense
    • innate immunity
    • trained immunity
    • immunodeficiency
    • autoinflammatory diseases
    • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • In vitro models of development and disease
    • Phenotypic variation
    • bone disease
    • tissue engineering
  • Stephen G Young
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Research focus
    • Lipoproteins
    • nuclear lamins
    • histones
    • triglyceride metabolism
    • cholesterol metabolism

Immunology

Senior editors
  • Arup K Chakraborty

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Immunology

    Arup Chakraborty is the Robert T Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at MIT. He is the founding Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He is also a founding steering committee member of the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard. Chakraborty was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley from December 1988 to September 2005, after which he moved to MIT. The central theme of his research since 2000 is the development and application of theoretical/computational approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, to aid the quest for mechanistic principles in immunology, and then harness this understanding to aid the design of vaccines against mutable pathogens (e.g., HIV). A characteristic of his work is the impact of his studies on experimental immunology and clinical studies (he collaborates extensively with immunologists). Arup’s work at the interface of the physical and life sciences has been recognized by honors that include an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the EO Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Arup is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Keywords
    Computational biology; immunology; statistical mechanics; signaling; virology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Arup Chakraborty is funded by the NIH and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard.

  • Wendy S Garrett

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wendy Garrett is the Melvin J and Geraldine L. Glimcher Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute. Her work explores host-microbiota interactions underlying mucosal immune homeostasis, gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders, and cancer. She graduated from the Yale College; received her MD PhD from Yale University and completed post-graduate training at Harvard.

    Keywords
    Host–microbiota interactions; microbiome; mucosal immunology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wendy Garrett receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, Hoffman-LaRoche, and Groupe Danone. She is a member of the Cell Reports and Journal of Clinical Microbiology editorial boards. She consults for Janssen and serves on the scientific advisory boards of Synlogic and Evelo Biosciences.

  • Michel Nussenzweig

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology

    Michel C Nussenzweig is the Zanvil A Cohn and Ralph Steinman Professor of Molecular Immunology and a Senior Physician at the Rockefeller University Hospital. Since 1990 he has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr Nussenzweig obtained his PhD working with Dr Ralph Steinman on the role of Dendritic Cells in initiating immunity. He received his MD degree from New York University Medical School and trained in Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Massachusetts General Hospital. As a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr Philip Leder in the Deparment of Genetics at Harvard Medical School he became interested in the development of antibody producing B lymphocytes. Dr Nussenzweig’s current research is focused on understanding the development of humoral immune responses. His laboratory uses molecular biology, mouse genetics, and perfoms experimental medicine studies in human volunteers to elucidate basic principles in immunology and medicine. Dr Nussenzweig was elected to the US National Academy of Medicine in 2009 and the US National Academy of Sciences in 2011.

    Keywords
    Adaptive immunity; innate immunity; HIV; dendritic cells

    Competing interests statement: 

    Michel Nussenzweig has received funding from the Howard Hughes Insititute, the US National Institutes of Health, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Roberston Fund at Rockefeller University. He is an editor of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, and the Journal of Immunological Methods. He is on the scientific advisory board of Celldex Therapeutics.

  • Tadatsugu Taniguchi

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology

    Tada Taniguchi is currently Professor of the Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Industrial Science of The University of Tokyo and Director of the Max Planck–The University of Tokyo Center for Integrative Inflammology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Zurich under the supervision of Charles Weissmann. His work principally concerns the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene expression that underlie immunity and oncogenesis. Many of his research projects have stemmed from his original identification of two cytokine genes, interferon-beta and interleukin-2. These discoveries have laid the groundwork for the molecular characterization of the various systems of cytokines as well as therapeutic advances achieved by the administration of cytokines. One extension of this research was his discovery of a new family of transcription factors, the interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), which he and others have since identified as playing integral roles in the regulation of the immune system and cancer. He has received numerous awards, including the Robert Koch Prize, Pezcoller-AACR International Award for Cancer Research, and was bestowed the Person of Cultural Merit award from the Government of Japan. He was also elected Foreign Associate Member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, in 2003.

    Keywords

    Innate immunity; adaptive immunity; immunological disease; anti-tumor immunity; gene regulation in immune cells; signaling in immune cells; visualisation of immune responses 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tada Taniguchi has received funding from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology in Japan. He is a member of the editorial boards of Annual Review of Immunology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Immunity. He is a member of the board of directors of the Japan Molecular Biology Society, and served as member of the Science Council of Japan between 2005 and 2011. He also served as co-chairperson of the International Affairs Committee of The American Association for Cancer Research between 2002 and 2008.

     

Reviewing editors
  • Pamela Bjorkman
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • immunology
    • HIV
  • Xuetao Cao
    Zhejiang University School of Medicine (China)
    Research focus
    • Immunology of APCs
    • TLR signalling and immune regulation
    • cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy
  • Zhijian J Chen
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • ubiquitin
  • Michael Dustin
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Immunological synapse
    • cell adhesion
    • T cell activation
    • immune cell migration
    • microscopy
  • Ronald N Germain
    National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (United States)
    Research focus
    • T-cell receptor signalling
    • immune cell migration
    • cell–cell interaction
  • Christopher Glass
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • nuclear organisation
    • transcription
    • transcriptional genomics
    • macrophage biology
    • inflammation
  • David M Knipe
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA topology
    • epigenetic regulation
    • latent infection
    • innate and intrinsic immunity
    • vaccines
  • Urszula Krzych
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Malaria
    • adaptive immunity
    • vaccines
  • Tomohiro Kurosaki
    Osaka University (Japan)
    Research focus
    • B cells
    • antibody
    • signaling
  • Bruno Lemaître
    Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • pattern recognition
    • entomopathogens
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Diane Mathis
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • T cell activation
    • immunoregulation
    • autoimmunity
  • Fiona M Powrie
    Oxford University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Mucosal immunity
    • inflammation
  • Yijun Qi
    Tsinghua University (China)
    Research focus
    • Plant small RNAs
    • long non-coding RNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Satyajit Rath
    National Institute of Immunology (India)
    Research focus
    • Physiological functions of redox active "Secondary metabolites"
    • lymphocyte development
    • lymphocyte responses
    • macrophage activation
    • immunity in disease
  • Shimon Sakaguchi
    Osaka University (Japan)
    Research focus
    • B cells
    • immune tolerance
    • autoimmune disease
    • tumor immunity
  • Feng Shao
    National Institute of Biological Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial-fungal interaction
    • innate immunity
  • David Wallach
    The Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Immune defense
    • programmed cell death
    • activation of transcription factors
  • Wayne M Yokoyama
    Washington University (United States)
    Research focus
    • NK cells
    • innate immune system
    • topoisomerases
    • MCMV
    • CPXV

Microbiology & infectious disease

Senior editors
  • Wendy S Garrett

    Expertise: 
    • Immunology
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wendy Garrett is the Melvin J and Geraldine L. Glimcher Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute. Her work explores host-microbiota interactions underlying mucosal immune homeostasis, gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders, and cancer. She graduated from the Yale College; received her MD PhD from Yale University and completed post-graduate training at Harvard.

    Keywords
    Host–microbiota interactions; microbiome; mucosal immunology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wendy Garrett receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, Hoffman-LaRoche, and Groupe Danone. She is a member of the Cell Reports and Journal of Clinical Microbiology editorial boards. She consults for Janssen and serves on the scientific advisory boards of Synlogic and Evelo Biosciences.

  • Prabhat Jha

    Expertise: 
    • Epidemiology & global health
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Prabhat Jha has been a key figure in epidemiology and economics of global health for the past decade. He is the University of Toronto Endowed Professor in Disease Control and Canada Research Chair at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the founding Director of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Professor Jha is a lead investigator of the Million Death Study in India, which quantifies the causes of premature mortality in over one million homes from 19972014 and which examines the contribution of key risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, diet, and environmental exposures. He is co-investigator of the Disease Control Priorities Network and the author of several influential books on tobacco control, including two that helped enable a global treaty on tobacco control, now signed by over 160 countries. Prior to founding CGHR, Professor Jha served as Senior Scientist for the World Health Organization, where he co-led the work on health and poverty for the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health. Earlier, he headed the World Bank team responsible for developing the Second National HIV/AIDS Control Program in India. His advisory work has included the Government of South Africa on its national health insurance plan, and the United States Institute of Medicine on global health. Notable recognitions include the Order of Canada (2013) for contributions to global health, the  Luther Terry Award for Research on Tobacco Control (2012), The Globe and Mail 25 Transformational Canadians (2010), Top 40 Canadians under Age 40 Award (2004), the Ontario Premier’s Research Excellence Award (2004), and Gold Medal from the Poland Health Promotion Foundation (2000). Professor Jha holds an MD from the University of Manitoba and a DPhil from Oxford University, where he studied as a Canadian Rhodes Scholar.

    Keywords

    Epidemiology; global health; infectious disease and population dynamics; randomized controlled trials

    Competing interests statement: 

    Prabhat Jha has received funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Canadian International Development Research Agency, Canadian International Development Agency, the International Science and Technology Program of the Canadian government, and the US National Institutes of Health. He serves on the editorial board of Demography India. He advises several agencies and the Canadian government on epidemiology, disease control strategies, and tobacco control, and serves on the advisory board of the UK Biobank.

  • Wenhui Li

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Wenhui Li is an Investigator of the National Institute of Biological Sciences (NIBS), Beijing, China. He received a bachelor’s degree in medicine from the Medical School of Lanzhou University in 1994 and his PhD from the Peking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in 2001. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School, Li joined NIBS as an Assistant Investigator in 2007 and rose to the rank of Investigator in 2015. His team at NIBS identified a liver bile acids transporter (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide, NTCP) as a functional receptor for Hepatitis B and D virus. Li’s research interest has been focusing on the molecular mechanisms of viral infections: currently his laboratory combines virology, biochemistry, immunology, and chemical biology to investigate molecular mechanisms of HBV/HDV infection.

    Keywords

    Virus infection; hepatitis B/D virus; receptor; antivirals

    Competing interests statement: 

    Wenhui Li receives funding from the Ministry of Science and Technology, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the Science and Technology Bureau of Beijing Municipal Government. He serves as a member of the editorial boards of Chin J Virol (2011–), Virologica Sinica (2013–), and J Biol Chem (2016–).

  • Richard Losick

    Expertise: 
    • Microbiology & infectious disease

    Richard Losick is the Maria Moors Cabot Professor of Biology, a Harvard College Professor, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences at Harvard University. He received his A.B. in Chemistry at Princeton University and a Ph.D. from MIT. He was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows. He is a past Chairman of the Departments of Cellular and Developmental Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Member of the American Philosophical Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. He is a recipient of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Selman A Waksman Award of the NAS, the Canada Gairdner Award, and the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize for Biology or Biochemistry of Columbia University.

    Keywords

    Microbiology; bacteria; fungi; protozoans

    Competing interests statement: 

    Richard Losick receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the scientific advisory boards for the Jane Coffin Childs Fund, the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis & HIV (K-RITH), and TenNor Therapeutics Limited. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.

Reviewing editors
  • Axel A Brakhage
    Friedrich Schiller University Jena and Hans-Knöll-Institut (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Infection biology of fungi
    • microbial secondary metabolism
    • microbial communication
    • biotechnology
    • transcription factors
    Experimental organism
    • Aspergillus
    • Myxococcus xanthus
    • Macrophages
    • Neutrophils
  • Jon Clardy
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbial secondary metabolism
    • chemical communications
    • biosensors
    • chemical biology
    • microbial ecology and evolution
  • Eduardo Franco
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Human biology and medicine
    • microbiology and infectious disease
    • cancer epidemiology and prevention
    • screening
    • human papillomavirus infection
  • Michael Gilmore
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial cell biology
    • antibiotic resistance
    Experimental organism
    • Enterococci
  • Stephen P Goff
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Retrovirus replication
    • virus assembly
  • Jean Greenberg
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Local and long distance signalling in innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • bacterial pathogens
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • N. benthamiana
    • Tomato
    • Pseudomonas
  • Peter Greenberg
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Microbe–microbe communication
  • Eduardo A Groisman
    Yale University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial pathogens
    • symbionts
  • Simon I Hay
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Infectious diseases of the tropics
    • epidemiology
    Experimental organism
    • Plasmodia
    • Leishmania
    • viruses
  • Mark Jit
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Public Health England (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Immunisation
    • health economics
    • mathematical modelling of infectious diseases
  • David M Knipe
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • DNA topology
    • epigenetic regulation
    • latent infection
    • innate and intrinsic immunity
    • vaccines
  • Urszula Krzych
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Malaria
    • adaptive immunity
    • vaccines
  • Michael Laub
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • bacterial development
    • bacterial systems biology
    • signal transduction
  • Elena Levashina
    Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Malaria ecology
    • Mosquito immune system
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Marc Lipsitch
    Harvard School of Public Health (United States)
    Research focus
    • Mathematical modeling
    • evolution of pathogens
    • epidemiology of infectious diseases
    Experimental organism
    • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Tam Mignot
    Aix-Marseille University (France)
    Research focus
    • Signal transduction
    • motility
    • bacterial development
    • Bacterial cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • Myxococcus xanthus
  • Richard A Neher
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • population genetics
    • evolution of RNA viruses
    • biophysics
  • Dianne Newman
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Evolution of photosynthesis
    • Physiological functions of redox active "Secondary metabolites"
    Experimental organism
    • R. palustris
    • P. aeruginosa
  • Thorsten Nurnberger
    University of Tübingen (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant immunity
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Feng Shao
    National Institute of Biological Sciences (China)
    Research focus
    • Bacterial-fungal interaction
    • innate immunity
  • Dominique Soldati-Favre
    University of Geneva (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Host-parasite interactions
    • apicomplexa biology
    • motility
    Experimental organism
    • Toxoplasma gondii
    • Plasmodium
  • Gisela Storz
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (United States)
    Research focus
    • Small noncoding RNAs
    • oxidative stress
    Experimental organism
    • E. coli
  • Wesley Sundquist
    University of Utah (United States)
    Research focus
    • Virus-host interactions
    • retroviruses
    • HIV
    Experimental organism
    • Human cells

Neuroscience

Senior editors
  • Eve Marder

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Eve Marder

    is the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience at Brandeis University. Marder is a Past President of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Marder is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Fellow of the Biophysical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Society of Neuroethology. She received the Miriam Salpeter Award from WIN, the WF Gerard Prize from the SfN, the Miller Prize from the Society for Cognitive Neuroscience, the Karl Spenser Lashley Prize from the American Philosophical Society, and the Gruber Prize in Neuroscience. Marder served on the NIH BRAIN Initiative working group. Marder studies the dynamics of small neuronal networks, and her work was instrumental in demonstrating that neuronal circuits are not "hard-wired" but are reconfigured by neuromodulators to produce a variety of outputs. She now studies the extent to which similar network performance can arise from different sets of network parameters.

    Keywords

    Neurobiology; central pattern generators; neuromodulation; homeostasis; circuit dynamics; neuronal excitability; computational models of neuronal dynamics

    Competing interests statement: 

    Eve Marder is employed by Brandeis University. She receives research and training funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Leir Foundation, and the Swartz Foundation. She serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of Janelia Farm. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association of Science, and a Fellow of the Biophysical Society. She presently serves on editorial boards of Current Biology, Current Opinion in Neurobiology, and Progress in Neurobiology.

     

  • Richard Aldrich

    Expertise: 
    • Biophysics & structural biology
    • Neuroscience

    Rick Aldrich is the Karl Folkers Chair II in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research and Professor of Neuroscience at The University of Texas at Austin. He joined the faculty in 2006 and served as chair until 2011. Previously he was on the faculty of Neurobiology (1985-1990) and of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (1990-2006) at Stanford University where he served as department chair from 20012004. He was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1990 to 2006. His work is on molecular mechanisms of ion channels and calcium signaling proteins, with an emphasis on understanding gated conformational changes and allosteric mechanisms. Work in the laboratory is multidisciplinary including electrophysiology, biochemistry, spectroscopy, informatics and computation. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He is past president of the Biophysical Society and the Society of General Physiologists, and has received the Kenneth Cole Award for Membrane Physiology from the Biophysical Society and Alden Spencer Award for Neuroscience Research from Columbia University.

    Keywords

    Ion channels; calcium binding proteins; membrane transport; allostery and cooperativity; cellular neurophysiology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Richard Aldrich is employed by The University of Texas at Austin. He receives research funding from the National Institutes of Health.He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He serves actively on the editorial boards of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and The Journal of General Physiology.

  • Timothy Behrens

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Tim Behrens is Professor of Computational Neuroscience at Oxford University and University College London, and a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow. His work investigating the neural mechanisms that control behaviour has made an impact across scales from cells to brain regions across mammalian species. He has also developed widely used approaches for measuring brain connections non-invasively that have been taken up by the Human Connectome Project, where he is a senior investigator and chair of the anatomical connectivity team.

    Keywords

    Cognition; behavioural neuroscience; learning and decision making; brain imaging; brain connectivity; computational neuroscience; neural coding 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Tim Behrens receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, the James S McDonnell Foundation, the National Institute of Health, and the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. He is on the editorial board of PLOS Biology.

  • Catherine Dulac

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Catherine Dulac is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences at Harvard University. Her work explores the molecular biology of pheromone detection and signaling in mammals, and the neural mechanisms underlying age-, species-, and sex-specific behaviors. She graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris; received her PhD from the University of Paris VI at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Embryology (Nogent-sur-Marne); and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and a member of the French Academy of Sciences, Institute of France. She is a recipient of the Liliane Bettencourt Prize, the Richard Lounsbery Award, the Perl/UNC Neuroscience Prize and the IPSEN Foundation Neuronal Plasticity prize.

    Keywords

    Cellular and molecular neuroscience; molecular and genetic basis of sex and species-specific social behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    Catherine Dulac receives funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. She is a member of the editorial boards of Current Opinion in Neurobiology and The Journal of Comparative Neurology. She is a member of selection committees for the following awards and prizes: McKnight Foundation Technical Innovation Award, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship Program, The Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, the New York Stem Cell Foundation Innovator Awards in Neuroscience, the Smith Family Awards Program for Excellence in Biomedical Research and the Searle Scholars. She also serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards for the following organizations: Senomyx, Allen Institute, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research. She is a member of the Visiting Committee for MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and she serves as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health Somatosensory and Chemosensory Study Section.

     

  • Sabine Kastner

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Sabine Kastner is Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology at Princeton University. Kastner studies the neural basis of visual perception, attention, and awareness in the primate brain using a combination of electrophysiology and neuroimaging methods. She has made numerous contributions particularly to the functional organization of the human attention network, the parcellation of the human parietal cortex, the role of the thalamus in perception and cognition, and the topographic and functional organization of the human visual system. Kastner has served as Reviewing and Senior Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience and currently serves as the Specialty Chief Editor for ‘Frontiers for young minds’ - Understanding neuroscience, the first open-access journal for children 8-14 that educates about neuroscience research.

    Keywords
    Cognitive and systems neuroscience; neuroimaging and intracranial electrophysiology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Sabine Kastner receives funding for her research from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the James S McDonnell Foundation. She serves on the editorial boards of Neuron, F1000, and Neuropsychologia.

  • Andrew J King

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Andrew King is Professor of Neurophysiology and a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, where he heads the Auditory Neuroscience Group in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. His research uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the neural basis for auditory perception and multisensory integration. His group is currently investigating the representation and coding of sound features by populations of neurons, how neural responses adjust to changes in the statistical distribution of sounds associated with different acoustic environments, and the capacity of the brain to compensate for the changes in inputs that result from hearing loss. He was awarded the Wellcome Prize in Physiology in 1990 and was made a Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011.

     

    Keywords

    Auditory system; auditory perception; multisensory integration

    Competing interests statement: 

    Andrew King receives funding for his research from the Wellcome Trust, the University of Oxford, and from Action on Hearing Loss. He serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Physiology and Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. He is a member of the Sir Henry Dale Fellowship Interview Committee, Action on Hearing Loss PhD Review Panel, Auditory Verbal UK Advisory Board, and the Agir Pour L’Audition Scientific Prize Committee.

  • David Van Essen

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    David Van Essen is Alumni Endowed Professor of Neurobiology at Washington University in St Louis. He is internationally known for his research on the structure, function, connectivity, and development of cerebral cortex in humans and nonhuman primates. He is a pioneer in neuroinformatics and data sharing efforts in neuroscience. He was Chair of the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology (1992–2012) and was previously on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (1976–1992). He has served as President of the Society for Neuroscience, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience, founding chair of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, and president of the Association of Medical School Neuroscience Department Chairs. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received the Krieg Cortical Discoverer Award from the Cajal Club, the Peter Raven Lifetime Achievement Award from the St Louis Academy of Science, and the Second Century Award from the Washington University School of Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator for the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project, a large-scale effort to characterize brain connectivity and its relation to behavior in a large population of healthy young adults.

    Keywords

    Cerebral cortex; neuroanatomy; neuroimaging; systems neurophysiology; vision; non-human primates

    Competing interests statement: 

    David Van Essen is employed by Washington University in St Louis. He receives funding from the National Institutes of Health. He serves on the advisory board of the Allen Institute for Brain Science and the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Institute of Mental Health. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is on the editorial boards of Brain Connectivity, Journal of Comparative Neurology, and Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

  • K VijayRaghavan

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells
    • Genes & chromosomes
    • Neuroscience

    Vijay’s research aims to understand motor- and olfactory- circuit assembly: from deciphering how each component is made, interacts, and stabilises into functioning in the animal to allow behaviour in the real world. Related to the development of network function is its maintenance in the mature animal; another aspect of the work in the laboratory addresses how mature neurons and muscles are maintained. The laboratory uses a genetic approach, mainly using the fruit fly but also collaborating with those using mouse and cell-culture. VijayRaghavan is Secretary to the Government of India in the Ministry of Science and Technology in the Department of Biotechnology. He temporarily holds additional charge of the Department of Biotechnology. VijayRaghavan’s research continues at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Bangalore, India, where he is Distinguished Professor. He studied engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. His doctoral work was at TIFR, Mumbai and postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology. VijayRaghavan is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Foreign Associate of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

    Keywords

    Developmental biology; neurogenetics; neurobiology; genetic basis of behavior

    Competing interests statement: 

    K VijayRaghavan currently receives research support from the Indo–French research agency CEFIPRA, and core support from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). Previous support was from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the Indian Department of Science and Technology (DST), Department of Biotechnology (DBT), CEFIPRA, the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). VijayRaghavan serves on the Board of Governors of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Janelia Farm Research Campus of the HHMI, Chair of the Research Council of the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, and Member of the Governing Council of the National Institute of Immunology. He is Associate Editor of BMC Developmental Biology, and a member of the editorial boards of Development, Seminars in Developmental Biology, and Bioconcepts. He is Chair of the Board of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-CAMP), a not-for-profit company of the National Centre for Biological Sciences and the stem cell institute, inStem, created to manage platform technologies and for technology transfer on the NCBS–inStem campus. He is a member of the board of the Madhuram Narayanan Centre for Exceptional Children, a not-for-profit school for disabled children in Chennai, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Human Frontier Science Program.

     

     

  • Gary Westbrook

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine
    • Neuroscience

    Gary Westbrook is a Senior Scientist and Co-Director of the Vollum Institute and Rocky and Julie Dixon Professor of Neurology at Oregon Health and Science University. Dr Westbrook is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Neuroscience. He has received Javits and Merit awards from NIH for his research as well as an International Cooperation Award from the Max Planck Society. Dr Westbrook received his medical training and did graduate study in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, followed by residencies in Internal Medicine and Neurology, and basic neuroscience research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Earlier work in his lab was mostly directed at the level of receptors, particularly N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the function of single synapses. The emphasis has now largely shifted to studies of small networks (microcircuits) in the hippocampus and olfactory system. Dr Westbrook maintains interests in clinical neurology, particularly epilepsy, as well as graduate research training – he currently serves as the director of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vollum/OHSU.

    Keywords

    Neuroscience; synaptic transmission; brain microcircuits; neurological diseases

    Competing interests statement: 

    Gary Westbrook is employed by Oregon Health and Science University. He receives research and training funding from the National Institutes of Health and the Ellison Medical Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He serves on Scientific Advisory Boards for Max Planck Institutes in Göttingen (MPIEM) and Florida (MPFI), the Myelin Repair Foundation, and on study sections for the National Institutes of Health. He is currently a member of editorial boards for Physiological Reviews and Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

  • Huda Zoghbi

    Expertise: 
    • Neuroscience

    Huda Zoghbi is Professor of Pediatrics, Neurology, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. She is also an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital. Her research focuses on understanding normal brain development and on elucidating the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including the autism spectrum disorder, Rett syndrome, and late-onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    Keywords

    Neurodegenerative disorders; polyglutamine disorders; autism; synaptic disorders; neurogenetics 

    Competing interests statement: 

    Huda Zoghbi is actively receiving funds from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, Rett Syndrome Research Trust, International Rett syndrome Foundation (and she is a member of advisory panels for all 4 organizations), Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children’s Hospital. She is Associate Editor of Annual Reviews of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial team of Cell and Neuron. She is Vice-Chair of the McKnight Neuroscience Fund and a member of the following Scientific Advisory Panels: the Jane Coffin Childs Fund,  Gruber Genetics Prize Jury, Janssen Prize Jury, Lasker Jury, and Vilcek Prize Jury. She was an elected member at large of the 2015 Class Membership Committee of the National Academy of Sciences.

Reviewing editors
  • Susan L Ackerman
    The Jackson Laboratory (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodegeneration
    • neurodevelopment
    • cerebellum
    • mouse genetics
  • Marlene Bartos
    University of Freiburg (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • GABAergic cells
    • network oscillations
    • synaptic plasticity
  • Hugo J Bellen
    Baylor College of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Drosophila neurobiology
    • Drosophila neurodegeneration
    • Drosophila technology
    Experimental organism
    • S. cerevisiae
  • Dwight Bergles
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Glia function
    • Neuron-glia interactions
  • Upinder S Bhalla
    National Centre for Biological Sciences (India)
    Research focus
    • Olfaction
    • hippocampus
    • computational neuroscience
    • olfactory bulb
    • antibody
    • synapses
    • signaling
  • Alexander Borst
    Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Visual processing
    • systems neuroscience
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Olga Boudker
    Weill Cornell Medical College (United States)
    Research focus
    • Membrane transport
    • glutamate pumps
  • Hiram Brownell
    Boston College (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neuroscience
    • neuropsychology
    • methodology
    • communication impairments
  • Axel T Brunger
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Structural biology
    • synaptic transmission
    • neurotransmitters
  • Neil Burgess
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • hippocampus
    • Episodic memory
    • Spatial navigation
    • Human short term memory
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • Rat
  • Ronald L Calabrese
    Emory University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Motor pattern generation
    • neuronal and small networks models
    • electrophysiological properties of neurons and synapse
    • computational neuroscience
    Experimental organism
    • Leech
  • Catherine Carr
    University of Maryland (United States)
    Research focus
    • Auditory neuroscience
  • Constance Cepko
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • viral vectors
    • retina
    • blindness
  • Baron Chanda
    University of Wisconsin - Madison (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channels
    • Voltage-gating
    • Temperature-sensing
    • Ligand-gating
    • Allostery and dynamics
    • Single molecule studies
    • Fluorometry
  • Moses V Chao
    New York University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular and cellular neurobiology
    • signal transduction
    • trophic factors
    • receptors
  • Maurizio Corbetta
    Washington University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Attention networks
    • function and physiology of spontaneous activity
    • functional brain organization and stroke recovery
  • Rui M Costa
    Champalimaud Center for the Unknown (Portugal)
    Research focus
    • Basal ganglia
    • striatum
    • dopamine
    • action
    • learning
    • electrophysiology
    • Cilia
    • motor
    • movement
    • cortex
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • Jody C Culham
    Western University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Brain imaging
    • fMRI
    • Auditory neuroscience
    • vision
  • Lila Davachi
    New York University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Recognition
    • recollection
    • working memory
    • episodic encoding
  • Graeme W Davis
    University of California, San Francisco (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodegeneration
    • neural development
    • synaptic transmission
    • plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Howard Eichenbaum
    Boston University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neurobiology
    • hippocampus
    • antibody
  • Joel K Elmquist
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Body weight homeostasis
    • central autonomic control
    • diabetes and glucose homeostasis
    • neurobiology and neuroanatomy of the hypothalamus
  • Russ Fernald
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Behavioral biology
    • epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • plant seeds
  • Michael J Frank
    Brown University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational neuroscience
    • prefrontal cortex
    • basal ganglia
    • cognitive control
    • reinforcement learning
  • Jack L Gallant
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cognitive neuroscience
    • computational neuroscience
    • systems neuroscience
  • David D Ginty
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurotrophic factors
    • peripheral nervous system development
    • mechanosensory neurons
    • tactile processing
    • spinal cord
  • Joseph G Gleeson
    The Rockefeller University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disease
    • brain development
  • Alison Goate
    The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States)
    Research focus
    • Dementia
    • addiction
    Experimental organism
    • Human
  • Yukiko Goda
    RIKEN Brain Science Institute (Japan)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • synapse cell biology
    Experimental organism
    • rodents
  • Michel Goedert
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Tau
    • alpha-synuclein
    • neurodegeneration
    • protein misfolding
    • amyloid
  • Joshua I Gold
    University of Pennsylvania (United States)
    Research focus
    • Perception
    • perceptual decision making
    • learning
    • electrophysiology
    Experimental organism
    • Primates
  • Leslie C Griffith
    Brandeis University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Behavioral biology
    • molecular neurobiology
    • electrophysiology
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Oliver Hobert
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • MicroRNAs
    • epigenetics
    • developmental neurobiology
    Experimental organism
    • C. elegans
  • John Huguenard
    Stanford University School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Epilepsy
    • thalamocortical circuits
    • ion channels
    • Synaptic transmission
  • Richard Ivry
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Auditory neuroscience
    • temporal processing
    • executive control
    • motor learning
  • Reinhard Jahn
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Membrane proteins
    • secretion
    • synaptic transmission
  • Heidi Johansen-Berg
    University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Neural and cognitive plasticity
    • brain imaging
  • Mary B Kennedy
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic plasticity
    • synaptic regulation
    • biochemical signal transduction networks
    • systems biology
  • Ole Kiehn
    Karolinska Institute (Sweden)
    Research focus
    • Neural circuits
    • motor
    • spinal cord
  • Eunjoon Kim
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (South Korea)
    Research focus
    • Neurodevelopmental disorders
    • synapse development and plasticity
    • synaptic transmission
  • David Kleinfeld
    University of California, San Diego (United States)
    Research focus
    • Active sensing
    • blood flow
    • brainstem
    • neuronal circuitry
    • optical imaging
    • sensorimotor control
  • Robb Krumlauf
    Stowers Institute for Medical Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Hox genes
    • vertebrate development
    • axial patterning
    • craniofacial development
    • gene regulatory networks
    • developmental neurobiology
  • Peter Latham
    University College London (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • bayesian inference
    • network dynamics
    • neural coding
    • synaptic plasticity
  • Liqun Luo
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • neural circuits
    • olfaction
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Gail Mandel
    Oregon Health and Science University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neuronal gene expression
    • astrocyte biology
  • Carol Mason
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Visual system development
    • Cell adhesion
    • axon guidance
  • Peggy Mason
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Nociceptive modulation
    • pain
    • serotonin
    • empathy
    • bulbospinal modulation
  • Lisa Monteggia
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Psychiatric disorders
    • depression
    • neurotrophin signaling
    • neurodevelopmental disorders
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • mouse
  • Thomas D Mrsic-Flogel
    University of Oregon (United States)
    Research focus
    • Visual system development
    • high-resolution imaging
    • Sensory biology
  • Jeremy Nathans
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Developmental neurobiology
    • planar cell polarity
    • photoreceptors
    • vision
    • ophthalmology
  • Klaus-Armin Nave
    Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Neuron-glia interactions
    • myelin-associated diseases
    • oligodendrocytes
    • Schwann cells
  • Sacha B Nelson
    Brandeis University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genome-wide gene expression in the nervous system
    • cellular and systems neurophysiology
    • forebrain development and function
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Other mammals
  • Harry Orr
    University of Minnesota (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular genetics
    • neurodegenerative disease
    • spinocerebellar ataxia
  • Richard Palmiter
    University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Genetics and behaviour
    • body weight control
    • catecholamines
    • mitochondria
  • Tatiana Pasternak
    University of Rochester (United States)
    Research focus
    • High level vision
    Experimental organism
    • Macaque monkeys
  • Christine Petit
    Institut Pasteur (France)
    Research focus
    • Sensory biology
    • ear & hearing
    • genetics
  • Serge Przedborski
    Columbia University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Dementia
    • neurodegeneration
    • Mitochondria
  • Louis Ptáĉek
    University of California, San Francisco (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurogenetics
    • circadian rhythms/sleep
    • episodic disorders
  • Indira M Raman
    Northwestern University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Electrophysiology
    • ion channels
    • synaptic transmission
    • cerebellum
    • voltage-clamp
  • Mani Ramaswami
    Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)
    Research focus
    • Neurogenetics
    • neural circuits
    • olfaction
    • learning and memory
    • mechanisms of neuronal translational control
    • mRNA localization
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Jan-Marino Ramirez
    Seattle Children's Research Institute and University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Rhythmic activity
    • Rett syndrome
    • hypoxia
    • Epilepsy
  • Jennifer Raymond
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • neural circuits
    • learning
    • synaptic plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
  • Fred Rieke
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington (United States)
    Research focus
    • Non-human primates
    • computational neuroscience
    • biophysics
  • Christian Rosenmund
    Charité (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • neurotransmitter release
    • exocytosis
    • plasticity
    Experimental organism
    • Other mammals
  • Emilio Salinas
    Wake Forest School of Medicine (United States)
    Research focus
    • Computational neuroscience
    • perceptual decision making
    • neural circuit models
    • urgent choices
    • eye movement
    • monkey neurophysiology
    • vision
  • Wolfram Schultz
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Reward
    • uncertainty
    • thalamocortical circuits
  • Kristin Scott
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • chemosensation
    • gustatory processing
    • Drosophila neuroscience
    • neural circuits
    • urgent choices
    Experimental organism
    • D. melanogaster
  • Kang Shen
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Synapse
    • neuronal cytoskeleton
    • neuronal cell biology
    • developmental neurobiology
  • Barbara G Shinn-Cunningham
    Boston University (United States)
    Research focus
    • temperature-sensing
    • spatial hearing
    • neuro-electric imaging
    • neural coding
    • plasticity and learning in auditory tasks
  • Frances K Skinner
    Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network (Canada)
    Research focus
    • hippocampus
    • neural circuit models
    • neurological diseases
  • Inna Slutsky
    Tel Aviv University (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Synaptic transmission
    • short-term plasticity
    • helicases
    Experimental organism
    • Rodents
  • Nahum Sonenberg
    McGill University (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Protein synthesis
    • cell signalling and translation
    • translational control of memory
  • Klaas Stephan
    University of Zurich and ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
    Research focus
    • Translational neuromodeling
  • Beth Stevens
    Boston Children's Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neuron-glia interactions
    • synaptic pruning
    • phagocytic macrophages
    • microglia
  • Karel Svoboda
    Janelia Research Campus (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cortex
    • somatosensation
    • imaging
    • calcium
    • neural circuits
    • sensorimotor
    • coding
    • synapse cell biology
    • dendrite
    Experimental organism
    • Mouse
  • Kenton J Swartz
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (United States)
    Research focus
    • Ion channel structure and mechanisms
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • temperature-sensing
    • mechanisms of toxins and drugs
    • lipid-protein interactions
  • Joseph S Takahashi
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Molecular neuroscience
    • circadian clocks
    • mouse genetics
    Experimental organism
    • mouse
    • rodents
  • J Paul Taylor
    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurological disorders
    • RNA granules
    • protein quality control
    Experimental organism
    • Drosophila
  • Doris Y Tsao
    California Institute of Technology (United States)
    Research focus
    • monkey neurophysiology
    • mouse vision
    • neural circuit models
    • human brain stimulation with ultrasound
  • Naoshige Uchida
    Harvard University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Olfaction
    • perceptual decision making
    • learning
  • Eilon Vaadia
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)
    Research focus
    • Motor cortex
    • sensorimotor learning
    • brain machine Interface
    • cortical dynamics
    • neuronal synchrony
    • oscillations
    • active inference
    • motor control
  • Mark CW van Rossum
    University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • synaptic plasticity
    • noise in neural systems
    • the early visual system
    • retina
  • Andrew West
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)
    Research focus
    • Neurological disorders
    • neurodegeneration
    Experimental organism
    • Human
    • rodents
  • Anne West
    Duke University Medical Center (United States)
    Research focus
    • Transcriptional mechanisms
    • synapse development and plasticity

Plant biology

Senior editors
  • Detlef Weigel

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Detlef Weigel received his PhD in 1988 from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. After postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty of the Salk Institute in 1993. Since 2002, he has been director of the Department of Molecular Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. His current research interests focus on natural genetic variation and evolutionary genomics of plants. Examples of recent important projects are the 1001 Genomes project for Arabidopsis thaliana, and the systematic dissection of deleterious epistasis between Arabidopsis strains due to autoimmunity. Among the awards he has received are the Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Otto Bayer Award. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society.

    Keywords

    Natural variation; epigenetics; evolutionary genomics; plant biology; genomics; evolutionary biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Detlef Weigel has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the Foundation of the State of Baden-Württemberg, the German Ministry for Education and Research, the European Commission, the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization, and several US Federal agencies. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology and Genome Biology. He is Chair of EMBO Council, and is serving or has recently served on the Advisory Boards of the Epigenomics of Plants International Consortium, Bayer Crop Science, The Arabidopsis Information Resource, Flanders Institute of Biotechnology, Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, and the Sainsbury Laboratory. He is a co-founder of Computomics and CeMet.

  • Ian Baldwin

    Expertise: 
    • Ecology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology
    • Plant biology

    Ian Baldwin studied biology and chemistry at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire and graduated 1981 with an AB. In 1989, he received a PhD in Chemical Ecology from Cornell University, in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior. He was an Assistant (1989), Associate (1993) and Full Professor (1996) in the Department of Biology at SUNY Buffalo. In 1996 he became the Founding Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, where he now heads of the Department of Molecular Ecology. In 1999 he was appointed Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. In 2002 he founded the International Max Planck Research School at the Max Planck Institute in Jena. Baldwin's scientific work is devoted to understanding the traits that allow plants to survive in the real world. To achieve this, he has developed a molecular toolbox for the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata (coyote tobacco) and a graduate program that trains “genome-enabled field biologists” to combine genomic and molecular genetic tools with field work to understand the genes that matter for plant-herbivore, -pollinator, -plant, -microbial interactions under real-world conditions. He has also been driver behind the open-access publication efforts of the Max Planck Society.

    Major subject area(s)

    Plant biology; evolution and ecology; secondary metabolism; organismic level gene function

    Competing interests statement: 

    Ian Baldwin has received funding from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the US National Science Foundation, the AW Mellon Foundation, the European Research Council, and the Human Frontiers Science Program Organization. He currently serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Integrated Plant Biology; and previously, Oecologia, Ecological Studies Series, Chemoecology, and The Plant Journal. He serves on the advisory boards of the Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Lytle Preserve, Brigham Young University, and more MPG programs than can be listed; and previously, the Institute of the Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Jülich, the Minerva Center for Arid Ecosystems Research, Hebrew University, the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, the Swiss NSF Priority Program "Plant Survival in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems”, and the DFG Priority Programs "Biological radiations" and "Trophic interactions and dynamics of communities".

  • Christian S Hardtke

    Expertise: 
    • Plant biology

    Christian Hardtke obtained a PhD in Developmental Biology from the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich in 1997 for his work on plant embryogenesis. He then moved to Yale University as an HFSP postdoctoral fellow to study photomorphogenesis, before joining McGill University as Assistant Professor in 2001. He was appointed Associate Professor at the University of Lausanne in 2004, where he became Full Professor and director of the Department of Plant Molecular Biology in 2010. His research revolves around the molecular genetic control of plant development, with a focus on quantitative aspects of plant growth and morphology. He is particularly interested in mechanisms of vascular tissue differentiation and their relation to root system architecture, as well as the intersection of these mechanisms with natural genetic variation. 

    Keywords
    Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, natural variation, developmental cell biology

    Competing interests statement: 

    Christian Hardtke has received funding from the Human Frontier Science Program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, various EU research programs and the Swiss National Science Foundation. He is currently an editor of Plant and Cell Physiology and also serves on the editorial board of EMBO Reports.

Reviewing editors
  • Richard Amasino
    University of Wisconsin (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Brachypodium distachyon
  • David Baulcombe
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
    Research focus
    • Plant development and epigenetics
    • RNA silencing
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Dominique Bergmann
    Stanford University (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • plant development
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Jörg Bohlmann
    University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Research focus
    • Metabolism
    • chemical ecology
    • plant genomics
    Experimental organism
    • Plants
  • Marcel Dicke
    Wageningen University (Netherlands)
    Research focus
    • Ecological entomology
    • plant–insect interactions
  • Jean Greenberg
    University of Chicago (United States)
    Research focus
    • Local and long distance signalling in innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • bacterial pathogens
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • N. benthamiana
    • Tomato
    • Pseudomonas
  • Maria J Harrison
    Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe symbioses
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant mineral nutrition
    Experimental organism
    • Glomus
    • Medicago
  • Daniel J Kliebenstein
    University of California, Davis (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant–microbe interactions
    • quantitative biology
    • genome-wide association studies
    • plant genomics
    • ecological genomics
    • fungal cell cycle and morphogenesis
    • secondary metabolism
    • plant–insect interactions
  • Sheila McCormick
    University of California, Berkeley & USDA Agricultural Research Service (United States)
    Research focus
    • Cell polarity
    • signal transduction
    • plant gametophyte development
    • reproductive biology
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
    • Tomato
  • Magnus Nordborg
    Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)
    Research focus
    • Adaptation
    • population genetics
    • statistical genetics
    • Molecular genetics
  • Thorsten Nurnberger
    University of Tübingen (Germany)
    Research focus
    • Innate immunity
    • plant–microbe interactions
    • plant immunity
    Experimental organism
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Yijun Qi
    Tsinghua University (China)
    Research focus
    • Plant small RNAs
    • long non-coding RNAs
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Gary Stacey
    University of Missouri (United States)
    Research focus
    • Plant development
    • host-microbe interactions
    • extracellular ATP
    • peptide transport
    Experimental organism
    • Soybean
  • Zhiyong Wang
    Carnegie Institution for Science (United States)
    Research focus
    • Signaling networks and growth regulation
    • Signal transduction
    • Proteomics
    • Hormone
    Experimental organism
    • Maize
  • Hao Yu
    National University of Singapore & Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (Singapore)
    Research focus
    • functional microscopy
    • plant reproductive development
    • phytohormone signalling
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Orchid
  • Jian-Min Zhou
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)
    Research focus
    • Plant microbe interactions and signaling
  • Daniel Zilberman
    University of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Research focus
    • Chromatin biology
    • epigenetics
    • epigenomics
    • evolution
    Experimental organism
    • Rice
    • Arabidopsis thaliana

Past editors

Senior editors
  • Stylianos Antonarakis

    University of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)

    Stylianos Antonarakis

    Expertise: 
    • Human biology & medicine

    Stylianos E Antonarakis is Professor and Chairman of Genetic Medicine at the University of Geneva Medical School, and director of the iGE3 institute of Genetics and Genomics of Geneva. He is a physician-scientist, human geneticist, who extensively studied the relationship between genomic variation and phenotypic variation. He was educated in the University of Athens (MD and DSc) and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Human Genetics). His academic contributions at the Johns Hopkins and the University of Geneva spans more than 30 years, and include the understanding of the molecular bases of monogenic disorders and complex genetic disorders including the beta-thalassemias, hemophilias, trisomy 21, and the functional variability of the human genome. He has published extensively (more than 620 papers), is co-editor of the current edition of the classic textbook Genetics in Medicine, and he is listed as one of the highly cited scientists by the ISI institute (h-index 104). He was the President of the European Society of Human Genetics, and now the President of HUGO. His current interests and research projects are the functional analysis of the genome, effect of human genetic variation to phenotypic variation, the molecular pathogenesis of trisomy 21 and polygenic phenotypes, the functional characterization of the conserved fraction of the genome, diagnostics and prevention of genetic disorders, and the societal implications of genetics and genome research.

    Keywords
    Human genetics; genetic variation; genotype-phenotype map; genomics; medical genetics

     
    Competing interests statement: 

    Stylianos Antonarakis has received funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the European Union, the European Research Council (ERC), the National Institutes of Health, and the Lejeune, Gebert, and Ludwig foundations. He is the President of HUGO (the Human Genome Organization) since 2013, a member of the scientific council of the SNSF, and chair of the Genetics panel of the ERC. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards of Imagine (Paris), Bioacademy Institute (Athens), and the Centre for Applied Genomics (Toronto).

     

  • Joseph L Goldstein

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (United States)

    Joseph L Goldstein

  • James Kadonaga

    University of California, San Diego (United States)

    James Kadonaga

    Expertise: 
    • Biochemistry
    • Genes & chromosomes

    Jim Kadonaga was an undergraduate in Chemistry at MIT, a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Harvard University, and a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Biochemistry at UC Berkeley. He joined the faculty at UCSD in 1988 and served as the Chair of the Section of Molecular Biology from 2003 to 2007. Jim's research interests include the regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II as well as chromatin assembly and dynamics. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology. He also received the 2012 UCSD Chancellor's Associates Award for Excellence in Research in Science and Engineering. Jim is presently the Amylin Chair in the Life Sciences and a Distinguished Professor in the Section of Molecular Biology at UCSD.

    Keywords

    Transcription factors; chromatin modification; gene expression

    Competing interests statement: 

    Jim Kadonaga receives research support from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. He is currently on the Editorial Boards of Molecular Cell, PLOS Biology, and Transcription.

  • Chris Ponting

    University of Oxford (UK)

    Chris Ponting

    Expertise: 
    • Computational & systems biology
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Chris' research has had a substantial impact across diverse biomedical areas. The SMART domain database has been a major organisational principle that has proved to be of benefit across all of cellular and molecular biology; his evolutionary genomics research has provided guiding principles in differentiating genes that are similar – and those that are different – between model organisms and humans; his demonstration that approximately 8.2% of the human genome is functional demarcates the experiments necessary to fully understand transcriptional regulation; and, his evolutionary studies on non-coding RNAs provided the justification required for many that these contribute greatly to biological complexity. Chris is Deputy Director of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Functional Genomics Unit, is an Associate Faculty Member of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and is Professor of Genomics at the University of Oxford. He holds grants from the MRC, Parkinson's UK, Wellcome Trust, and the European Research Council (Advanced Grant).

    Competing interests statement: 

    Chris Ponting receives funding from the UK Medical Research Council, the European Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Parkinson’s UK and Systems Biology Limited. He serves on the editorial boards of Genome Biology, Human Molecular Genetics, and the Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics. He is Deputy Director of the MRC Functional Genomics Unit and an Associate Faculty Member of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. He is an elected member of EMBO and the Academy of Medical Sciences. He serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of ELIXIR and the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University.

  • Janet Rossant

    University of Toronto (Canada)

    Janet Rossant

    Expertise: 
    • Developmental biology & stem cells

    Janet Rossant grew up in the UK and trained at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. She joined the Canadian Hospital for Sick Children in 2005 as Head of its Research Institute. She is also a university professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto. Throughout her career, she has been a pioneer in manipulating the mouse embryo, deriving novel stem cell lines and interrogating the mouse genome. She is a Fellow of the Royal Societies of London (2000) and Canada (1993), and a Foreign Associate of the National Academies of Science, USA (2008). She was awarded the McLaughlin Medal of the Royal Society of Canada (1998), Eli Lilly/Robert L. Noble Prize from the National Cancer Institute of Canada (2000), Killam Prize for Health Sciences (2004), and FASEB Excellence in Science Award (2004). She received the 2007 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology along with the late Dr. Anne McLaren, and the 2007 Conklin Medal of the Society for Developmental Biology, of which she is a Past President.

    Keywords
    Vertebrate development biology; mouse models of human disease; stem cells

    Competing interests statement: 

    Janet Rossant receives funding from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Ontario Research Fund, and the SickKids Foundation. She is on the editorial boards of Cell Stem Cell and Stem Cells, and she is a member of the Medical Advisory board of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

     

  • Diethard Tautz

    Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology (Germany)

    Diethard Tautz

    Expertise: 
    • Genomics & evolutionary biology

    Diethard Tautz is since 2006 Director of the Department for Evolutionary Genetics at the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, Germany. He did his PhD at the EMBL in Heidelberg, followed by postdoc phases on molecular evolution in Cambridge (UK) and on the molecular analysis of developmental processes in Drosophila at the MPI for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, where he joined the group of Herbert Jäckle. In 1991 he became Professor in the Department of Zoology in Munich and in 1998 he moved to a chair in "Evolutionary Genetics" at the Department of Genetics of the University of Cologne. In his research, he combined his interests in molecular evolution and developmental biology, and was one of the founders of the emerging Evo-Devo field. In parallel, he worked on questions of behavioral ecology and speciation mechanisms, based on his discovery of microsatellite-based DNA fingerprinting. His current interests center around studying the genetics of adaptations, using wild populations of the house mouse as a model system. He is also continuing his work on molecular evolution, with a special emphasis on the de novo evolution of genes. He has served as Editor-in-Chief for Development, Genes and Evolution, and was a co-founder of the open-access journal Frontiers in Zoology.

    Keywords
    Molecular evolution; evolution of development; comparative genomics; adaptation; behavioral ecology; speciation

    Competing interests statement: 

    Diethard Tautz is funded by the Max-Planck Society and the European Research Council. He currently serves as Senior Editor for Molecular Ecology and on the editorial board of Frontiers in Zoology, Development Genes and Evolution, and Briefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics. He served on a number of Max-Planck committees and on the evaluation committees for academic institutions.

     

  • Xiaodong Wang

    National Institute of Biological Sciences (China)

    Xiaodong Wang

Reviewing editors
  • Salim Abdool Karim
    CAPRISA (South Africa)
  • Edoardo M Airoldi
    Harvard University (United States)
  • James Allison
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)
  • Dora E Angelaki
    Baylor College of Medicine (United States)
  • Andrea Ballabio
    Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (Italy)
  • Ben Barres
    Stanford School of Medicine (United States)
  • Andrea Brand
    University College London (United Kingdom)
  • Emery N Brown
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
  • Michael S Brown
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
  • Matteo Carandini
    University College London (United Kingdom)
  • Arul Chinnaiyan
    University of Michigan (United States)
  • Joanne Chory
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
  • David E Clapham
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School (United States)
  • Pascale Cossart
    Institut Pasteur (France)
  • Patrick Cramer
    Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)
  • Valerie Daggett
    University of Washington (United States)
  • George Q Daley
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
  • Robert B Darnell
    The Rockefeller University (United States)
  • Bart De Strooper
    VIB and KU Leuven (Belgium)
  • Emmanouil T Dermitzakis
    University of Geneva (Switzerland)
  • Peter A Edwards
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
  • Anne Ferguson-Smith
    Cambridge University (United Kingdom)
  • Jim Ferrell
    Stanford University (United States)
  • Nir Friedman
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)
  • Todd Golub
    Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (United States)
  • Bruce L Goode
    Brandeis University (United States)
  • Roderic Guigó
    Center for Genomic Regulation (Spain)
  • Bin Han
    National Center for Gene Research (China)
  • Greg Hannon
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (United States)
  • Michael Hausser
    University College London (United Kingdom)
  • Jules Hoffmann
    National Center for Scientific Research (France)
  • Brigid Hogan
    Duke University (United States)
  • Christine E Holt
    University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
  • Gerhard Hummer
    The Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany)
  • Barbara Imperiali
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
  • Steve Jackson
    University College London (United Kingdom)
  • Leemor Joshua-Tor
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (United States)
  • Nancy Kanwisher
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
  • Sekar Kathiresan
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (United States)
  • Jeffery W Kelly
    Scripps Research Institute (United States)
  • Philipp Khaitovich
    Partner Institute for Computational Biology (China)
  • Roberto Kolter
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
  • Antonio Lanzavecchia
    Institute for Research in Biomedicine (Switzerland)
  • Ruth Lehmann
    New York University School of Medicine (United States)
  • Beth Levine
    UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)
  • Michael Levitt
    Stanford University (United States)
  • Pat Levitt
    University of Southern California (United States)
  • John Mattick
    Garvan Institute of Medical Research (Australia)
  • Ruslan Medzhitov
    Yale University (United States)
  • Freda Miller
    The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto (Canada)
  • Todd C Mockler
    Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (United States)
  • Jodi Nunnari
    University of California, Davis (United States)
  • Hideyuki Okano
    Keio University (Japan)
  • Ewa Paluch
    University College London (United Kingdom)
  • Luis Parada
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)
  • Roy Parker
    University of Colorado (United States)
  • Mercedes Pascual
    University of Michigan (United States)
  • Dana Pe'er
    Columbia University (United States)
  • Sam Pfaff
    Salk Institute for Biological Studies (United States)
  • Nikolaus Pfanner
    University of Freiburg (Germany)
  • Kathrin Plath
    University of California, Los Angeles (United States)
  • Franck Polleux
    Columbia University (United States)
  • Carol Prives
    Columbia University (United States)
  • Rama Ranganathan
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical School (United States)
  • Ranulfo Romo
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)
  • Benoit Roux
    University of Chicago (United States)
  • David M Sabatini
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
  • Sema Sgaier
    Surgo Foundation and Harvard School of Public Health (United States)
  • Yigong Shi
    Tsinghua University (China)
  • John Stamatoyannopoulos
    University of Washington (United States)
  • Louis Staudt
    National Cancer Institute (United States)
  • Sarah Teichmann
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (United Kingdom)
  • Stephen Tollman
    Wits University (South Africa)
  • Misha Tsodyks
    Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
  • Victor Velculescu
    Johns Hopkins University (United States)
  • C Peter Verrijzer
    Erasmus MC (Netherlands)
  • Christopher T Walsh
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
  • Johannes Walter
    Harvard Medical School (United States)
  • Xiao-Jing Wang
    New York University (United States)
  • Stephen C West
    The Francis Crick Institute (United Kingdom)
  • Nicholas J White
    Mahidol University (Thailand)
  • Phil Zamore
    University of Massachusetts (United States)
  • Xiaowei Zhuang
    Harvard University (United States)

Board of Directors

  • Toby Coppel

    Toby is a Co-Founder and Partner at Mosaic Ventures, an early stage venture capital firm based in London. He has been in investing and operating roles in the internet sector since 1996. Prior to Mosaic, as a Partner at Virgin and an active angel investor over the past four years, Toby has made investments in companies such as Criteo, CreativeLive, Hailo, Pinterest and Transferwise, and served on boards including Criteo, Virgin Care, Virgin Galactic and Virgin Mobile (France). Toby was previously SVP Corporate Development and Chief Strategy Officer at Yahoo! from 2001-2007 where he led the team that invested $1 billion into Alibaba for a 40% ownership stake in 2005 and acquired over 30 startups, including Flickr, Inktomi and Overture, for an aggregate of over $4 billion. Toby also ran Yahoo!’s European operations from 2007-2009, a $1 billion division of Yahoo! with over 2,000 employees. Prior to this, Toby was an Internet Investor at Windsor Media and Allen & Company, and was a Financial Analyst at Goldman Sachs. Toby graduated with an MA from Oxford University, where he was awarded a First in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, and later earned an MBA (with Distinction) from Harvard Business School.

  • Christian Hernandez Gallardo

    Christian Hernandez Gallardo has over 16 years of operating experience in technology companies, developing and scaling products and businesses internationally. Prior to co-founding White Star Capital, Christian worked at Facebook and led the international expansion of the company's Business Development, Platform and Gaming Partnerships groups. He previously held leadership roles in the US and Europe at Google and Microsoft and started his career in technology at MicroStrategy, a start-up he joined prior to its 1999 IPO. Christian has worked closely with entrepreneurs and leading VCs and has been an active angel investor and advisor. He serves on the Board of Advisors of Seedcamp and the Digital Task force for the EVCA.

    Christian holds a degree in Economics from Duke University and an MBA from The Wharton School. Born in El Salvador and having grown up across the Latin America, the US and Europe, he now resides in London with his wife and three children.

  • Bill S Hansson

    Bill S Hansson is vice president of the Max Planck Society and Director at the Max Planck institute for chemical ecology. He was born in Jonstorp, in the south of Sweden, and studied biology at the University of Lund. After his PhD in ecology and a postdoctoral stay in the United States, he became Professor for Chemical Ecology, first in Lund and, beginning in 2001, at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Alnarp. In 2006, he was appointed Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society. As vice president of the Max Planck Society, Bill Hansson's main area of responsibility is the biological-medical section, where he is in charge of science and functionality in general. He also has a general responsibility for internationality and construction within the Max Planck Society. As head of the Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Bill Hansson focuses on neurophysiological and behavioral aspects of interactions between insects and their host plants. His main research interest is insect olfaction: How do insects detect odors, how is semiochemical information processed in the insect brain, and how does olfaction affect insect behavior? Bill Hansson is Honorary Professor at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena and a fellow of several national and international science academies, such as the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Royal Entomological Society. He has also received several distinguished awards for his research. He has lived in Jena with his wife and two children since 2007. Nevertheless, he maintains close ties to his home country, where he and his family usually spend the summer in their own forest.

  • Nouria Hernandez

    Nouria Hernandez was born in Geneva, Switzerland. She obtained a master in Biology from the University of Geneva in 1980 and a PhD from the University of Heidelberg in 1983. She carried out postdoctoral studies with Dr. Alan M. Weiner at Yale University and in 1987 joined Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory at Cold Spring Harbor, New York, as an Assistant Professor. She became a full Professor in 1993 and joined the Howard Hughes Medical Institute as an Associate Investigator in 1994, and an Investigator in 1999. In 2005, she joined the faculty of the University of Lausanne as the Director of the Center for Integrative Genomics (CIG). Nouria is a member of the EMBO and the Academia Europaea, and a recipient of the prize from the Professor Max Cloëtta Foundation. As of the summer of 2016, she will be the President of the University of Lausanne. Nouria studies mechanisms of gene expression using mammalian cultured cells and the mouse as models, and biochemistry and genomics as tools. She focuses on mechanisms of transcription by RNA polymerase III and on the functions of RNA polymerase III transcription regulation. 

  • Robert Tjian

    Robert Tjian is president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a position he has held since 2009, and a biochemist at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Tjian has made major contributions to the understanding of how genes work, including the pioneering discovery of proteins called transcription factors, which regulate gene expression. He received a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from UC Berkeley and a Ph.D. from Harvard. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory with James Watson, he joined the Berkeley faculty in 1979. He was named an HHMI investigator in 1987. Five years later, he co-founded the start-up company Tularik. Dr. Tjian is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He currently serves on the board of the Lasker Foundation and the journal eLife. He has served on the scientific boards of Genentech, Chiron and Amgen and has received numerous awards for his scientific contributions.

  • Mike Turner

    Mike Turner is currently Acting Director of Science and Head of Infection Biology at the Wellcome Trust. Before taking on the role of Acting Director of Science, he was Head of Infection and Immuno-Biology, a position he was appointed to in January 2014. The remit of the Infection and Immuno-biology department at the Trust includes all infectious diseases and immuno-biology of biomedical and veterinary relevance. Prior to joining the Trust, Mike was Professor of Parasitology at the University of Glasgow where his research interests focused on trypanosome, malaria and schistosome parasites.  

    Competing interests statement: 

     

     

Executive staff

  • Hannah Caton

    h [dot] caton [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Wei Mun Chan

    Wei Mun Chan joined eLife in September 2015, having previously worked in the Open Access Peer Review Management team at Wiley in Oxford. He has a PhD in Pharmacology from Imperial College, London, and prior to Wiley worked as a Senior Scientific Database Curator for UniProt at the European Bioinformatics Institute at Hinxton, UK. He works closely with the Executive Editor and the editorial team to ensure the smooth day-to-day running of and editorial health of the journal. wm [dot] chan [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Andy Collings

    After seven enjoyable years at PLOS, most latterly as Editorial manager for PLOS Computational Biology and PLOS Genetics, Andy joined eLife as the Managing editor in April 2012. Reporting to the Executive director, Andy has overall responsibility for the day-to-day running and editorial health of the journal, so if you have any feedback or ideas, please contact him: a.collings [at] elifesciences.org.

  • Lena Dowdall

    l.dowdall[at]elifesciences[dot]org

  • Hannah Drury

    h [dot] drury [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Nick Duffield

    n [dot] duffield [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • James Gilbert

    James Gilbert joined eLife in May 2012, having previously worked as a production assistant at BioMed Central. He has a degree in Natural Sciences and a Masters in History of Science from Durham University. He works with both the Editorial and Production teams to ensure the smooth review and publication of articles at eLife.

    j.gilbert[at]elifesciences[dot]org

  • Maria Guerreiro

    m [dot] guerreiro [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Melissa Harrison

    Melissa Harrison joins eLife as head of production operations and is instrumental in setting up the systems required to peer review and publish the content as efficiently as possible, utilizing new technologies and pushing available systems and vendors to the next level in automatable publication. She comes with good knowledge of production systems and technical requirements, and aims to advocate best practice in structuring and tagging content for reuse and mining, which is a crucial component of open-access publishing.

    Melissa spent a large part of her career at the BMJ Group working on the specialist journals, starting as production editor and working her way up to operations manager when she left.

    Since graduating from Kings College London with a degree in Biological Sciences she pursued her career in publishing and has fulfilled a number of roles in small publishing houses, from desk top publishing and cover design to commissioning and writing. She is also a fully trained copy editor. Melissa spent a short time working for an Indian publishing services vendor and so has experience of both sides of the fence.

    m.harrison [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Paul Kelly

    p.kelly [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Stuart King

    Stuart joined eLife in November 2013 following a PhD in molecular plant pathology at the John Innes Centre and the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK. Before that, he completed an undergraduate degree in biological sciences at Oxford.

    s.king [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Kora Korzec

    Kora enjoys almost a decade of diverse international communications experience from across private, public and non-profit sectors. She joined eLife in October 2014 from Engineers Without Borders UK, where she had expansive responsibilities in marketing, communications and project management. With a Master degree in psychology from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, Kora brings to the team her experience in social marketing and community engagement.

    k.korzec [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Nathan Lisgo

    n.lisgo [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Giuliano Maciocci

    Giuliano joined eLife in June 2015 after almost two decades in the high-tech corporate sector, where he applied his User Experience and Product Management skills to the creation of a broad range of digital experiences. With a strong focus on the user journey and a passion for innovation, Giuliano’s key mission at eLife is to explore new opportunities to expand eLife’s contribution to the scientific community, from an improved journal experience to innovative tools for authors and researchers. g [dot] maciocci [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Jennifer McLennan

    Jennifer comes to eLife with nearly seven years advocating for change in research communication and scholarly publishing with SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), which represents over 800 academic and research institutions worldwide and is a leading supporter of open access. As director of programs, Jennifer was responsible for the successful realization and promotion of SPARC initiatives – from grassroots legislative activism to organization mobilization on a global scale. Prior to SPARC, Jennifer led marketing and public relations for academic publishers and nonprofit organizations. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Victoria and a Master's degree in Business Administration from Athabasca University – both in Canada.

    Ç_
    j.mclennan [at] elifesciences [dot] org.

  • David Moulton

    d.moulton [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Emily Packer

    Emily brings approximately four years’ public relations experience to eLife, including work in both agency and in-house environments. Prior to eLife, she held the post of PR Manager for research and consulting firm GlobalData, where she led the team in spreading the word about the company and its research on the global healthcare and energy sectors, generating coverage in a variety of world-leading news outlets. Before GlobalData, she held PR Executive positions with Tangerine PR and Harvey & Hugo Marketing and PR, the latter of which she joined after graduating with a first class degree in Creative Writing with Journalism from the University of Chester.

    e [dot] packer [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Mark Patterson

    Mark Patterson was a researcher in human and yeast genetics for 12 years before moving into scientific publishing in 1994 as the Editor of Trends in Genetics. After a few years at Nature, where he was involved in the launch of the Nature Reviews Journals, he moved to the non-profit open-access startup publisher PLoS in 2003. As an editor, Mark helped to launch several of the PLoS Journals and was appointed as Director of Publishing in 2005. He was also one of the founders of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association. In November 2011, Mark joined the eLife team and has been building the professional staff team in Cambridge, UK, to help get the journal off the ground.

    m.patterson [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Naomi Penfold

    Naomi joined eLife in February 2016 after a PhD in the neuroscience of obesity at the Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK. Before this, she completed an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences, with Pharmacology as her specialism, at the University of Cambridge. Her interest in working to improve the biomedical and life sciences for all scientists involved was piqued by an internship in the science policy team at the Academy of Medical Sciences in London.

    n [dot] penfold [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Emma Pewsey

    Emma joined eLife in January 2014 whilst writing up her PhD about the corrosion of orthopaedic implants. Before this, she did a degree in natural sciences at the University of Cambridge, specialising in materials science. Her move from the lab into publishing was motivated by winning the Access to Understanding science-writing competition in 2013, for which one of the prizes was publication of her article in eLife.

    e.pewsey [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Susanna Richmond

    s [dot] richmond [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Siân Roderick

    Siân joins eLife, one of the world's newest scientific publishing companies, from one of the oldest, the Royal Society. She comes with the knowledge of more than 10 years in production at a range of publishers and has hands-on experience of all areas of the production process. Having graduated from Aberdeen University with a degree in physiology, Siân joined Future Drugs as a production editor where she was involved in all aspects of the production process. She then moved to the British Institute of Radiology's publishing team as production editor and later production coordinator working on both journals and books, before making her way through the ranks at the Royal Society from senior production editor to production manager. s.roderick [at] elifesciences [dot] org
  • Peter Rodgers

    Peter joined eLife as Features Editor in June 2012 and has worked in scientific publishing for more than twenty years. As Features Editor he oversees the non-research content of eLife and also the Digests that are included in all Research articles and Short reports. Previously he has been the Chief Editor of Nature Nanotechnology (2006-2012), where he had overall responsibility for all research and non-research content, and the Editor of Physics World magazine (1996-2005). Peter has a degree in physics from Imperial College London (1984) and a PhD from the Queen's University of Belfast (1988), and worked at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory before joining Physics World as an Assistant Editor in 1990.

  • Sarah Shailes

    Sarah joined eLife in September 2014 following a PhD studying friendly plant-microbe interactions at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK. Before that, she completed an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge, specializing in plant science. In her spare time she writes about plants and microbes on her blog (www.plantscientist.wordpress.com). s.shailes [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Alistair Shearer

    a [dot] shearer [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Giorgio Sironi

    I search for the harmony between form and context, which is a fancy way of saying I build software to fit in the world I'm in and its rapid changes.

    In the specific, my areas of expertise are testing, OOP design and distributed computing.

    g [dot] sironi [at] elifesciences [dot] org

  • Chris Wilkinson

    c [dot] wilkinson [at] elifesciences [dot] org

Review process

At eLife, we’ve taken a fresh approach to peer review to save you time, and to provide clear direction and constructive input. Decisions are quick and efficient; revision requests are designed to be clear and manageable; and multiple rounds of revision are usually avoided. Here’s how it works:

  1. Initial decisions are delivered quickly

    Our Senior editors decide whether initial submissions are appropriate for in-depth peer review, usually in consultation with members of the Board of Reviewing Editors.
  2. Active scientists make all decisions

    A Senior editor assigns a member of the Board of Reviewing Editors to oversee the peer-review process. The Reviewing editor usually reviews the article him or herself, calling on one or two additional reviewers as needed.
  3. Revision requests are consolidated

    Reviewers get together online to discuss their recommendations, refining their feedback, and striving to provide clear and concise guidance. If the work needs essential revisions before it can be published, the Reviewing editor incorporates those requirements into a single set of instructions.
  4. Limited rounds of revision

    Additional rounds of revision are largely eliminated, as the Reviewing editor is able to assess most revised submissions without further outside review.
  5. Decisions and responses are available for all to read

    In the interests of openness and transparency we publish the most substantive parts of the decision letter after review and the associated author responses.
4
days to initial decision *
33
days to post-review decision *
116
days submission to acceptance *
* median times, 2015

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