Community

The eLife community is working to help address some of the pressures on early-career scientists in a number of ways. Learn more about our work and advisory group, sign up for our monthly news, follow us on Twitter, and explore recent activities below.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest

  1. Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: Introducing the eLife Global South Committee for Open Science

    The newly-formed Global South Committee for Open Science will advise eLife on how best to promote equitable collaboration and inclusion.
  2. eLife Ambassadors Survey: Why postdocs leave labs?

    Discussions throughout the eLife Ambassadors programme have led to this initiative to investigate the reasons behind the premature departure of postdocs from research groups and the consequential impact of this phenomenon amid the ongoing postdoc crisis.
  3. Line drawing of a human figure sitting on a stylised brain, in front of white sparks on a lilac background. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Outgrowing self-denial

    Jay K Goldberg
    After hitting rock bottom a few months into a prestigious fellowship, a postdoc recounts how they found their way to ADHD medication, therapy, and better mental health.
  4. eLife Latest: Welcoming our newest editors in Africa

    Meet the 17 researchers in Africa who have just joined our editorial board.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    Special Issue: Systems Genetics

    Edited by David James et al.
    In this Special Issue we present a range of studies that showcase novel approaches that researchers are exploring to better decipher the link between genotype and phenotype.
  5. A cartoonish human figure sitting on the outline of a brain on a warm purple background with a bright white spark. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Working with my brain and not against it

    Tigist Tamir
    When attempts to capitalize on her undiagnosed ADHD traits led to repeated cycles of overwork and burnout, a postdoc re-evaluated how she faces the daily challenges of being a neurodivergent scientist.
  6. A cartoonish human figure sitting on the outline of a brain on a light brown background with a bright white spark. Vicky Bowskill (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: How to navigate fieldwork

    Hella Péter
    A PhD student recounts what she has learned from managing her ADHD between the office and the rainforest.
  7. A stick figure sitting on a brain on a grey-green background with white sparks

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: The meaning of self-acceptance

    Uyen Vo
    A research technician describes how receiving an ADHD diagnosis allowed her to re-examine how she sees herself and her work.
  8. A stick figure sitting on a brain on a light green background with white sparks

    Being Neurodivergent in Academia: Nothing wrong with me

    Simone Brixius-Anderko
    An assistant professor and group leader explains how being diagnosed with autism in her early 40s changed her approach to being a scientist.