1. Ecology
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Antagonistic Effects of Intraspecific Cooperation and Interspecific Competition on Thermal Performance

  1. Hsiang-Yu Tsai
  2. Dustin Reid Rubenstein
  3. Bo-Fei Chen
  4. Mark Liu
  5. Shih-Fan Chan
  6. De-Pei Chen
  7. Syuan-Jyun Sun
  8. Tzu-Neng Yuan
  9. Sheng-Feng Shen  Is a corresponding author
  1. Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, Republic of China
  2. Columbia University, United States
  3. Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e57022 doi: 10.7554/eLife.57022

Abstract

Understanding how climate-mediated biotic interactions shape thermal niche width is critical in an era of global change. Yet, most previous work on thermal niches has ignored detailed mechanistic information about the relationship between temperature and organismal performance, which can be described by a thermal performance curve. Here, we develop a model that predicts the width of thermal performance curves will be narrower in the presence of interspecific competitors, causing a species' optimal breeding temperature to diverge from that of its competitor. We test this prediction in the Asian burying beetle Nicrophorus nepalensis, confirming that the divergence in actual and optimal breeding temperatures is the result of competition with their primary competitor, blowflies. However, we further show that intraspecific cooperation enables beetles to outcompete blowflies by recovering their optimal breeding temperature. Ultimately, linking abiotic factors and biotic interactions on niche width will be critical for understanding species-specific responses to climate change.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Hsiang-Yu Tsai

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Dustin Reid Rubenstein

    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Bo-Fei Chen

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3005-8724
  4. Mark Liu

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Shih-Fan Chan

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. De-Pei Chen

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Syuan-Jyun Sun

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Tzu-Neng Yuan

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Sheng-Feng Shen

    Biodiversity Research Center, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    For correspondence
    shensf@sinica.edu.tw
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0631-6343

Funding

Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (103-2621-B-001 -003 -MY3)

  • Sheng-Feng Shen

National Science Foundation (IOS-1656098)

  • Dustin Reid Rubenstein

Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (101-2313-B-001 -008 -MY3)

  • Sheng-Feng Shen

Academia Sinica (AS-SS-106-05)

  • Sheng-Feng Shen

Academia Sinica (AS-IA-106-L01)

  • Sheng-Feng Shen

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Samuel L Díaz-Muñoz, University of California, Davis, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: March 18, 2020
  2. Accepted: July 28, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 18, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 21, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Tsai et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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