1. Developmental Biology
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Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila

  1. Rajaguru Aradhya
  2. Monika Zmojdzian
  3. Jean Philippe Da Ponte
  4. Krzysztof Jagla  Is a corresponding author
  1. Sloan-Kettering Institute, United States
  2. Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Clermont Université, France
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e08497 doi: 10.7554/eLife.08497

Abstract

How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Rajaguru Aradhya

    Rockefeller Research Laboratories, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Monika Zmojdzian

    Génétique Reproduction et Développement, Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Clermont Université, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Jean Philippe Da Ponte

    Génétique Reproduction et Développement, Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Clermont Université, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Krzysztof Jagla

    Génétique Reproduction et Développement, Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Clermont Université, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    For correspondence
    christophe.jagla@udamail.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Margaret Buckingham, Institut Pasteur, France

Publication history

  1. Received: May 3, 2015
  2. Accepted: October 28, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 9, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 29, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Aradhya et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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