1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Multivariate analysis of electrophysiological diversity of Xenopus visual neurons during development and plasticity

Research Article
  • Cited 12
  • Views 1,676
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e11351 doi: 10.7554/eLife.11351

Abstract

Biophysical properties of neurons become increasingly diverse over development, but mechanisms underlying and constraining this diversity are not fully understood. Here we investigate electrophysiological characteristics of Xenopus tadpole midbrain neurons across development and during homeostatic plasticity induced by patterned visual stimulation. We show that in development tectal neuron properties not only change on average, but also become increasingly diverse. After sensory stimulation, both electrophysiological diversity and functional differentiation of cells are reduced. At the same time, the amount of cross-correlations between cell properties increase after patterned stimulation as a result of homeostatic plasticity. We show that tectal neurons with similar spiking profiles often have strikingly different electrophysiological properties, and demonstrate that changes in intrinsic excitability during development and in response to sensory stimulation are mediated by different underlying mechanisms. Overall, this analysis and the accompanying dataset provide a unique framework for further studies of network maturation in Xenopus tadpoles.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Christopher M Ciarleglio

    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Arseny S Khakhalin

    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Angelia F Wang

    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Alexander C Constantino

    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Sarah P Yip

    Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Carlos D Aizenman

    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States
    For correspondence
    Carlos_Aizenman@brown.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All handling of animals was approved by Brown University IACUC in accordance with NIH guidelines. The animal protocol used for these experiments is "Regulation of Neural Excitability and Synaptic Function by Experience in the Developing Visual System (#1308000008C002)."

Reviewing Editor

  1. Mark CW van Rossum, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: September 3, 2015
  2. Accepted: November 12, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 14, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 16, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Ciarleglio et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 1,676
    Page views
  • 213
    Downloads
  • 12
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Neuroscience
    Radhia Kacher et al.
    Research Article

    Recent work on Huntington disease (HD) suggests that somatic instability of CAG repeat tracts, which can expand into the hundreds in neurons, explains clinical outcomes better than the length of the inherited allele. Here, we measured somatic expansion in blood samples collected from the same 50 HD mutation carriers over a twenty-year period, along with post-mortem tissue from 15 adults and 7 fetal mutation carriers, to examine somatic expansions at different stages of life. Post-mortem brains, as previously reported, had the greatest expansions, but fetal cortex had virtually none. Somatic instability in blood increased with age, despite blood cells being short-lived compared to neurons, and was driven mostly by CAG repeat length, then by age at sampling and by interaction between these two variables. Expansion rates were higher in symptomatic subjects. These data lend support to a previously proposed computational model of somatic instability-driven disease.