Neuroscience

Neuroscience

eLife publishes research including brain function, neuronal circuits, synapses, sensory processing and motor pattern generation. Decisions are made by journal editors who are active researchers in neuroscience.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Neuroscience

    Cocaine-induced adaptation of dopamine D2S, but not D2L autoreceptors

    Brooks G Robinson et al.
    Desensitization of the D2 autoreceptor is reduced following in vivo cocaine exposure due to plasticity in the D2S and not the D2L splice variant.
    1. Neuroscience

    Small molecule Photoregulin3 prevents retinal degeneration in the RhoP23H mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    Paul A Nakamura et al.
    Regulating rod gene expression with a small molecule ligand for the orphan nuclear receptor Nr2e3 rescues photoreceptors from degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.
    1. Neuroscience

    CD40 is a major regulator of dendrite growth from developing excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    Paulina Carriba, Alun M Davies
    CD40-activated CD40L-mediated reverse signalling has strikingly opposite effects on the growth of excitatory and inhibitory neuron dendrites in the developing brain of mice.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    The formation of the light-sensing compartment of cone photoreceptors coincides with a transcriptional switch

    Janine M Daum et al.
    Correlating changes in structure and gene expression in cone photoreceptors of mice daily, between birth and eye opening, created a resource that supports research in photoreceptor function, development, transplantation and repair.
    1. Neuroscience

    A unified internal model theory to resolve the paradox of active versus passive self-motion sensation

    Jean Laurens, Dora E Angelaki
    Central vestibular regions in the brainstem and cerebellum perform dynamic Bayesian inference to combine motor commands and sensory signals into an optimal estimate of self-motion.
    1. Neuroscience

    Gyrification of the cerebral cortex requires FGF signaling in the mammalian brain

    Naoyuki Matsumoto et al.
    FGF signaling is crucial for gyrus formation, proliferation of outer radial glial cells and expansion of upper layers of the cerebral cortex in gyrencephalic mammals.

Senior editors

  1. Richard Aldrich
    Richard Aldrich
    Senior Editor
  2. Timothy Behrens
    Timothy Behrens
    Senior Editor
  3. Richard Ivry
    Richard Ivry
    Senior Editor
  4. See more editors