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Guanylate cyclase 1 relies on rhodopsin for intracellular stability and ciliary trafficking

  1. Jillian N Pearring
  2. William J Spencer
  3. Eric C Lieu
  4. Vadim Y Arshavsky  Is a corresponding author
  1. Duke University School of Medicine, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 12
  • Views 1,171
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e12058 doi: 10.7554/eLife.12058

Abstract

Sensory cilia are populated by a select group of signaling proteins that detect environmental stimuli. How these molecules are delivered to the sensory cilium and whether they rely on one another for specific transport remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether the visual pigment, rhodopsin, is critical for delivering other signaling proteins to the sensory cilium of photoreceptor cells, the outer segment. Rhodopsin is the most abundant outer segment protein and its proper transport is essential for formation of this organelle, suggesting that such a dependency might exist. Indeed, we demonstrated that guanylate cyclase-1, producing the cGMP second messenger in photoreceptors, requires rhodopsin for intracellular stability and outer segment delivery. We elucidated this dependency by showing that guanylate cyclase-1 is a novel rhodopsin-binding protein. These findings expand rhodopsin's role in vision from being a visual pigment and major outer segment building block to directing trafficking of another key signaling protein.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Jillian N Pearring

    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. William J Spencer

    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Eric C Lieu

    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Vadim Y Arshavsky

    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    For correspondence
    vadim.arshavsky@duke.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocol A011-14-01 of Duke University.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jeremy Nathans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: October 3, 2015
  2. Accepted: November 20, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 21, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 23, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Pearring et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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