Feedforward motor information enhances somatosensory responses and sharpens angular tuning of rat S1 barrel cortex neurons

  1. Mohamed Khateb
  2. Jackie Schiller
  3. Yitzhak Schiller  Is a corresponding author
  1. Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Abstract

The primary vibrissae motor cortex (vM1) is responsible for generating whisking movements. In parallel, vM1 also sends information directly to the sensory barrel cortex (vS1). In this study, we investigated the effects of vM1 activation on processing of vibrissae sensory information in vS1 of the rat. To dissociate the vibrissae sensory-motor loop we optogenetically-activated vM1 and independently passively stimulated principal vibrissae. Optogenetic activation of vM1 supra-linearly amplified the response of vS1 neurons to passive vibrissa stimulation in all cortical layers measured. Maximal amplification occurred when onset of vM1 optogenetic activation preceded vibrissa stimulation by 20 milliseconds. In addition to amplification, vM1 activation also sharpened angular tuning of vS1 neurons in all cortical layers measured. Our findings indicated that in addition to output motor signals, vM1 also sends preparatory signals to vS1 that serve to amplify and sharpen the response of neurons in the barrel cortex to incoming sensory input signals.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Mohamed Khateb

    The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Jackie Schiller

    The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Yitzhak Schiller

    The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
    For correspondence
    y_schiller@yahoo.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6106-4580

Funding

Israel Science Foundation

  • Jackie Schiller

Adelis Foundation

  • Yitzhak Schiller

Prince Neurodegeneration Center

  • Yitzhak Schiller

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols of the technion.(protocol 007-01-2014) All surgery and experiments were performed under sodium urethane anesthesia, and every effort was made to minimize suffering.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Sacha B Nelson, Brandeis University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 25, 2016
  2. Accepted: January 5, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: January 6, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 27, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Khateb et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Mohamed Khateb
  2. Jackie Schiller
  3. Yitzhak Schiller
(2017)
Feedforward motor information enhances somatosensory responses and sharpens angular tuning of rat S1 barrel cortex neurons
eLife 6:e21843.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21843
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