1. Neuroscience
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Sloppy morphological tuning in identified neurons of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion

  1. Adriane G Otopalik  Is a corresponding author
  2. Marie L Goeritz
  3. Alexander C Sutton
  4. Ted Brookings
  5. Cosmo Joseph Guerini
  6. Eve Marder
  1. Brandeis University, United States
  2. University of Auckland, New Zealand
  3. Q-State Biosciences, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 18
  • Views 2,010
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e22352 doi: 10.7554/eLife.22352

Abstract

Neuronal physiology depends on a neuron's ion channel composition and unique morphology. Variable ion channel compositions can produce similar neuronal physiologies across animals. Less is known regarding the morphological precision required to produce reliable neuronal physiology. Theoretical studies suggest that morphology is tightly tuned to minimize wiring and conduction delay of synaptic events. We utilize high-resolution confocal microscopy and custom computational tools to characterize the morphologies of four neuron types in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the crab Cancer borealis. Macroscopic branching patterns and fine cable properties are variable within and across neuron types. We compare these neuronal structures to synthetic minimal spanning neurite trees constrained by a wiring cost equation and find that STG neurons do not adhere to prevailing hypotheses regarding wiring optimization principles. In this highly-modulated and oscillating circuit, neuronal structures appear to be governed by a space-filling mechanism that outweighs the cost of inefficient wiring.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Adriane G Otopalik

    Volen Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, United States
    For correspondence
    aotopali@brandeis.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3224-6502
  2. Marie L Goeritz

    Department of Marine Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Alexander C Sutton

    Volen Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Ted Brookings

    Q-State Biosciences, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Cosmo Joseph Guerini

    Biology Department, Brandeis University, Waltham, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Eve Marder

    Volen Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, United States
    Competing interests
    Eve Marder, Senior editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9632-5448

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R37NS17813)

  • Eve Marder

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (F31NS092126)

  • Adriane G Otopalik

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Ronald L Calabrese, Emory University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: October 14, 2016
  2. Accepted: January 27, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: February 8, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 23, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Otopalik et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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