UP-DOWN cortical dynamics reflect state transitions in a bistable network

  1. Daniel Jercog  Is a corresponding author
  2. Alex Roxin
  3. Peter Barthó
  4. Artur Luczak
  5. Albert Compte
  6. Jaime de la Rocha  Is a corresponding author
  1. Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Spain
  2. Centre de Recerca Matemàtica, Spain
  3. MTA TTK NAP B Research Group of Sleep Oscillations, Hungary
  4. University of Lethbridge, Canada
  5. Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Spain

Abstract

In the idling brain, neuronal circuits transition between periods of sustained firing (UP state) and quiescence (DOWN state), a pattern the mechanisms of which remain unclear. Here we analyzed spontaneous cortical population activity from anesthetized rats and found that UP and DOWN durations were highly variable and that population rates showed no significant decay during UP periods. We built a network rate model with excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) populations exhibiting a novel bistable regime between a quiescent and an inhibition-stabilized state of arbitrarily low rate. Fluctuations triggered state transitions, while adaptation in E cells paradoxically caused a marginal decay of E-rate but a marked decay of I-rate in UP periods, a prediction that we validated experimentally. A spiking network implementation further predicted that DOWN-to-UP transitions must be caused by synchronous high-amplitude events. Our findings provide evidence of bistable cortical network that exhibits non-rhythmic state transitions when the brain rests.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Daniel Jercog

    Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain
    For correspondence
    djercog@clinic.ub.es
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3849-9196
  2. Alex Roxin

    Centre de Recerca Matemàtica, Bellaterra, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Peter Barthó

    MTA TTK NAP B Research Group of Sleep Oscillations, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Artur Luczak

    Canadian Center for Behavioural Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Canada
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Albert Compte

    Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Jaime de la Rocha

    Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain
    For correspondence
    JROCHAV@clinic.cat
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3314-9384

Funding

AGAUR of the Generalitat de Catalunya (SGR14-1265)

  • Albert Compte

Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness together with the European Regional Development Fund (BFU2009-09537,BFU2012-34838)

  • Albert Compte

Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness together with the European Regional Development Fund (RYC-2011-08755)

  • Alex Roxin

EU Biotrack contract (PCOFUND-GA-2008-229673)

  • Alex Roxin

Hungarian Brain Research Program Grant (KTIA_NAP_13-2-2014-0016)

  • Peter Barthó

Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness together with the European Regional Development Fund (SAF2010-15730,SAF2013-46717-R,RYC-2009-04829)

  • Jaime de la Rocha

EU Marie Curie grants (PIRG07-GA-2010-268382)

  • Jaime de la Rocha

Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (SAF2015-70324R)

  • Jaime de la Rocha

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study involved analysis of previously published and new data. Previously published data (Bartho et al, J Neurophys. 2004, 92(1)) was obtained under a protocol approved by the Rutgers University Animal Care and Use Committee. One new data set was acquired in accordance with a protocol approved by the Animal Welfare Committee at University of Lethbridge (protocol # 0907). All surgeries were performed under anesthesia, and every effort was made to minimize suffering.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Mark CW van Rossum, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: October 16, 2016
  2. Accepted: July 21, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 4, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 4, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Jercog et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Daniel Jercog
  2. Alex Roxin
  3. Peter Barthó
  4. Artur Luczak
  5. Albert Compte
  6. Jaime de la Rocha
(2017)
UP-DOWN cortical dynamics reflect state transitions in a bistable network
eLife 6:e22425.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22425
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