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Microglial transglutaminase-2 drives myelination and myelin repair via GPR56/ADGRG1 in oligodendrocyte precursor cells

  1. Stefanie Giera
  2. Rong Luo
  3. Yanqin Ying
  4. Sarah D Ackerman
  5. Sung-Jin Jeong
  6. Hannah M Stoveken
  7. Christopher J Folts
  8. Christina A Welsh
  9. Gregory G Tall
  10. Beth Stevens
  11. Kelly R Monk  Is a corresponding author
  12. Xianhua Piao  Is a corresponding author
  1. Boston Children's Hospital, United States
  2. Washington University School of Medicine, United States
  3. University of Michigan Medical Center, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 10
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e33385 doi: 10.7554/eLife.33385

Abstract

In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin formation and repair are regulated by oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells, which sense and integrate signals from their environment, including from other glial cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The signaling pathways that coordinate this complex communication, however, remain poorly understood. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor ADGRG1 (also known as ADGRG1) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of OL development in humans, mice, and zebrafish, although its activating ligand for OL lineage cells is unknown. Here, we report that microglia-derived transglutaminase-2 (TG2) signals to ADGRG1 on OL precursor cells (OPCs) in the presence of the ECM protein laminin and that TG2/laminin-dependent activation of ADGRG1 promotes OPC proliferation. Signaling by TG2/laminin to ADGRG1 on OPCs additionally improves remyelination in two murine models of demyelination. These findings identify a novel glia-to-glia signaling pathway that promotes myelin formation and repair, and suggest new strategies to enhance remyelination.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Stefanie Giera

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Rong Luo

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Yanqin Ying

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Sarah D Ackerman

    Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Sung-Jin Jeong

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Hannah M Stoveken

    Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. Christopher J Folts

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0448-3711
  8. Christina A Welsh

    FM Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9802-725X
  9. Gregory G Tall

    Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  10. Beth Stevens

    FM Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    Beth Stevens, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4226-1201
  11. Kelly R Monk

    Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, United States
    For correspondence
    monkk@wustl.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  12. Xianhua Piao

    Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    For correspondence
    Xianhua.Piao@childrens.harvard.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7540-6767

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS094164)

  • Xianhua Piao

National Multiple Sclerosis Society (RG-1501-02577)

  • Xianhua Piao

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS08520)

  • Xianhua Piao

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS079445)

  • Kelly R Monk

National Multiple Sclerosis Society (FG 2063-A1/2)

  • Stefanie Giera

National Multiple Sclerosis Society (Harry Weaver Neuroscience Fellowship)

  • Kelly R Monk

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in accordance to the guidelines of the Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) protocols (17-12-3578R and 17-03-3378R) at Boston Children's Hospital. Zebrafish experiments were performed in compliance with Washington University's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) protocol (20160174)

Reviewing Editor

  1. Klaus-Armin Nave, Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: November 6, 2017
  2. Accepted: May 18, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 29, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 31, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Giera et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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