1. Developmental Biology
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HIF-2α is essential for carotid body development and function

  1. David Macias  Is a corresponding author
  2. Andrew S Cowburn
  3. Hortensia Torres-Torrelo
  4. Patricia Ortega-Sáenz
  5. José López-Barneo
  6. Randall Johnson  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  2. Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Spain
Research Article
  • Cited 21
  • Views 1,873
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e34681 doi: 10.7554/eLife.34681

Abstract

Mammalian adaptation to oxygen flux occurs at many levels, from shifts in cellular metabolism to physiological adaptations facilitated by the sympathetic nervous system and carotid body (CB). Interactions between differing forms of adaptive response to hypoxia, including transcriptional responses orchestrated by the Hypoxia Inducible transcription Factors (HIFs), are complex and clearly synergistic. We show here that there is an absolute developmental requirement for HIF-2α, one of the HIF isoforms, for growth and survival of oxygen sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body. The loss of these cells renders mice incapable of ventilatory responses to hypoxia, and this has striking effects on processes as diverse as arterial pressure regulation, exercise performance, and glucose homeostasis. We show that the expansion of the glomus cells is correlated with mTORC1 activation, and is functionally inhibited by rapamycin treatment. These findings demonstrate the central role played by HIF-2α in carotid body development, growth and function.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. David Macias

    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    dm670@cam.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8676-1964
  2. Andrew S Cowburn

    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Hortensia Torres-Torrelo

    Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Seville, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Patricia Ortega-Sáenz

    Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Seville, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. José López-Barneo

    Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Seville, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Randall Johnson

    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    rsj33@cam.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4084-6639

Funding

Wellcome

  • Randall Johnson

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This work was carried out with approval and following review of the University of Cambridge AWERB (Animal Welfare Ethical Review Board) and under license of the UK Home Office (Home Office License numbers 80/2618 and PC64B8953).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Kari Alitalo, University of Helsinki, Finland

Publication history

  1. Received: December 27, 2017
  2. Accepted: April 18, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 19, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 25, 2018 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: June 4, 2018 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2018, Macias et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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Further reading

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