Drosophila mushroom bodies integrate hunger and satiety signals to control innate food-seeking behavior

  1. Chang-Hui Tsao
  2. Chien-Chun Chen
  3. Chen-Han Lin
  4. Hao-Yu Yang
  5. Suewei Lin  Is a corresponding author
  1. Academia Sinica, Taiwan, Republic of China

Abstract

The fruit fly can evaluate its energy state and decide whether to pursue food-related cues. Here, we reveal that the mushroom body (MB) integrates hunger and satiety signals to control food-seeking behavior. We have discovered five pathways in the MB essential for hungry flies to locate and approach food. Blocking the MB-intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) and the MB output neurons (MBONs) in these pathways impairs food-seeking behavior. Starvation bi-directionally modulates MBON responses to a food odor, suggesting that hunger and satiety controls occur at the KC-to-MBON synapses. These controls are mediated by six types of dopaminergic neurons (DANs). By manipulating these DANs, we could inhibit food-seeking behavior in hungry flies or promote food seeking in fed flies. Finally, we show that the DANs potentially receive multiple inputs of hunger and satiety signals. This work demonstrates an information-rich central circuit in the fly brain that controls hunger-driven food-seeking behavior.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Chang-Hui Tsao

    Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Chien-Chun Chen

    Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Chen-Han Lin

    Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Hao-Yu Yang

    Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Suewei Lin

    Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    For correspondence
    sueweilin@gate.sinica.edu.tw
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7079-7818

Funding

Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (105-2628-B-001-005-MY3)

  • Suewei Lin

Academia Sinica

  • Suewei Lin

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Kristin Scott, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: January 22, 2018
  2. Accepted: March 15, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 16, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 20, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Tsao et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Chang-Hui Tsao
  2. Chien-Chun Chen
  3. Chen-Han Lin
  4. Hao-Yu Yang
  5. Suewei Lin
(2018)
Drosophila mushroom bodies integrate hunger and satiety signals to control innate food-seeking behavior
eLife 7:e35264.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.35264

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