Adult zebrafish Langerhans cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

  1. Sicong He
  2. Jiahao Chen
  3. Yunyun Jiang
  4. Yi Wu
  5. Lu Zhu
  6. Wan Jin
  7. Changlong Zhao
  8. Tao Yu
  9. Tienan Wang
  10. Shuting Wu
  11. Xi Lin
  12. Jianan Y Qu
  13. Zilong Wen
  14. Wenqing Zhang  Is a corresponding author
  15. Jin Xu  Is a corresponding author
  1. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong
  2. Southern Medical University, China
  3. Shenzhen Peking University, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Medical Center, China
  4. South China University of Technology, China

Abstract

The origin of Langerhans cells (LCs), which are skin epidermis-resident macrophages, remains unclear. Current lineage tracing of LCs largely relies on the promoter-Cre-LoxP system, which often gives rise to contradictory conclusions with different promoters. Thus, reinvestigation with an improved tracing method is necessary. Here, using a laser-mediated temporal-spatial resolved cell labeling method, we demonstrated that most adult LCs originated from the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (VDA), an equivalent to the mouse aorta, gonads, and mesonephros (AGM), where both hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and non-HSC progenitors are generated. Further fine-fate mapping analysis revealed that the appearance of LCs in adult zebrafish was correlated with the development of HSCs, but not T cell progenitors. Finally, we showed that the appearance of tissue-resident macrophages in the brain, liver, heart, and gut of adult zebrafish was also correlated with HSCs. Thus, the results of our study challenged the EMP-origin theory for LCs.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files. Source data files have been provided for all figures and supplementary figures.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sicong He

    Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0399-3904
  2. Jiahao Chen

    Key Laboratory of Zebrafish Modeling and Drug Screening for Human Diseases of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Department of Developmental Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Yunyun Jiang

    Key Laboratory of Zebrafish Modeling and Drug Screening for Human Diseases of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Department of Developmental Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Yi Wu

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Lu Zhu

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Wan Jin

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Changlong Zhao

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Tao Yu

    Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Neuronal Structural Biology, Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen Peking University, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Medical Center, Shenzhen, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Tienan Wang

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Shuting Wu

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Xi Lin

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Jianan Y Qu

    Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Zilong Wen

    Division of Life Science and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Wenqing Zhang

    Key Laboratory of Zebrafish Modeling and Drug Screening for Human Diseases of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Department of Developmental Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    For correspondence
    mczhangwq@scut.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  15. Jin Xu

    Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
    For correspondence
    xujin@scut.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6840-1359

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China (31229003)

  • Zilong Wen

Research Grants Council, University Grants Committee (16102414)

  • Zilong Wen

Innovation and Technology Commission (ITCPD/17-9)

  • Zilong Wen

Research Grants Council, University Grants Committee (16103515)

  • Zilong Wen

Research Grants Council, University Grants Committee (HKUST5/CRF/12R)

  • Zilong Wen

Research Grants Council, University Grants Committee (AoE/M-09/12)

  • Zilong Wen

Research Grants Council, University Grants Committee (T13-607/12R)

  • Zilong Wen

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Leonard I Zon, Boston Children's Hospital, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: February 22, 2018
  2. Accepted: June 14, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 15, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 25, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, He et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Sicong He
  2. Jiahao Chen
  3. Yunyun Jiang
  4. Yi Wu
  5. Lu Zhu
  6. Wan Jin
  7. Changlong Zhao
  8. Tao Yu
  9. Tienan Wang
  10. Shuting Wu
  11. Xi Lin
  12. Jianan Y Qu
  13. Zilong Wen
  14. Wenqing Zhang
  15. Jin Xu
(2018)
Adult zebrafish Langerhans cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells
eLife 7:e36131.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.36131

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