1. Neuroscience
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The adipocyte hormone leptin sets the emergence of hippocampal inhibition in mice

  1. Camille Dumon
  2. Diabe Diabira
  3. Ilona Chudotvorova
  4. Francesca Bader  Is a corresponding author
  5. Semra Sahin
  6. Jinwei Zhang
  7. Christophe Porcher
  8. Gary Wayman
  9. Igor Medina
  10. Jean-Luc Gaiarsa  Is a corresponding author
  1. Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), France
  2. Washington State University, United States
  3. University of Exeter Medical School, United Kingdom
Research Article
  • Cited 6
  • Views 1,380
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e36726 doi: 10.7554/eLife.36726

Abstract

Brain computations rely on a proper balance between excitation and inhibition which progressively emerges during postnatal development in rodent. g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission supports inhibition in the adult brain but excites immature rodent neurons. Alterations in the timing of the GABA switch contribute to neurological disorders, so unveiling the involved regulators may be a promising strategy for treatment. Here we show that the adipocyte hormone leptin sets the tempo for the emergence of GABAergic inhibition in the newborn rodent hippocampus. In the absence of leptin signaling, hippocampal neurons show an advanced emergence of GABAergic inhibition. Conversely, maternal obesity associated with hyperleptinemia delays the excitatory to inhibitory switch of GABA action in offspring. This study uncovers a developmental function of leptin that may be linked to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders and helps understanding how maternal environment can adversely impact offspring brain development.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Camille Dumon

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Diabe Diabira

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Ilona Chudotvorova

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Francesca Bader

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    For correspondence
    francesca.bader@inserm.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Semra Sahin

    Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Jinwei Zhang

    Institute of Biochemical and Clinical Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8683-509X
  7. Christophe Porcher

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Gary Wayman

    Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Igor Medina

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6839-5414
  10. Jean-Luc Gaiarsa

    INMED (Institut de Neurobiologie de la Méditerranée), Aix-Marseille University UMR 1249, INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Marseille, France
    For correspondence
    jean-luc.gaiarsa@inserm.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7354-0559

Funding

National Institutes of Health (Grant MH086032)

  • Gary Wayman

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animal procedures were carried out in accordance with the European Union Directive of 22 September (2010/63/EU).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Marlene Bartos, University of Freiburg, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: March 16, 2018
  2. Accepted: August 9, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 14, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 28, 2018 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: December 4, 2018 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2018, Dumon et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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