A resource for the Drosophila antennal lobe provided by the connectome of glomerulus VA1v

  1. Jane Anne Horne  Is a corresponding author
  2. Carlie Langille
  3. Sari McLin
  4. Meagan Wiederman
  5. Zhiyuan Lu
  6. C Shan Xu
  7. Stephen M Plaza  Is a corresponding author
  8. Louis K Scheffer
  9. Harald F Hess
  10. Ian A Meinertzhagen  Is a corresponding author
  1. Dalhousie University, Canada
  2. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, United States

Abstract

Using FIB-SEM we report the entire synaptic connectome of glomerulus VA1v of the right antennal lobe in Drosophila melanogaster. Within the glomerulus we densely reconstructed all neurons, including hitherto elusive local interneurons. The fruitless-positive, sexually dimorphic VA1v included >11,140 presynaptic sites with ~38,050 postsynaptic dendrites. These connected input olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, 51 ipsilateral, 56 contralateral), output projection neurons (18 PNs), and local interneurons (56 of >150 previously reported LNs). ORNs are predominantly presynaptic and PNs predominantly postsynaptic; newly reported LN circuits are largely an equal mixture and confer extensive synaptic reciprocity, except the newly reported LN2V with input from ORNs and outputs mostly to monoglomerular PNs, however. PNs were more numerous than previously reported from genetic screens, suggesting that the latter failed to reach saturation. We report a matrix of 192 bodies each having >50 connections; these form 88% of the glomerulus' pre/postsynaptic sites.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files. Source data files have been provided for Figures 5, 8 and Figure 2-source data 1. Grayscale and segmentation data are hosted at a Janelia website: http://emdata.janelia.org/AL-VA1v. Data can be viewed in a web browser using neuroglancer. Please see the readme file on how to access the data programmatically using dvid and DICED (this can be accessed by clicking on ""AL-VA1v"" (hyperlinked) at http://emdata.janelia.org/AL-VA1v).

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Jane Anne Horne

    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    For correspondence
    jah@dal.ca
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Carlie Langille

    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Sari McLin

    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Meagan Wiederman

    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Zhiyuan Lu

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. C Shan Xu

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8564-7836
  7. Stephen M Plaza

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    For correspondence
    plazas@janelia.hhmi.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Louis K Scheffer

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3289-6564
  9. Harald F Hess

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Ian A Meinertzhagen

    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    For correspondence
    I.A.Meinertzhagen@Dal.Ca
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6578-4526

Funding

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (Janelia FlyEM)

  • Jane Anne Horne
  • Carlie Langille
  • Sari McLin
  • Meagan Wiederman
  • Zhiyuan Lu
  • C Shan Xu
  • Stephen M Plaza
  • Louis K Scheffer
  • Harald F Hess
  • Ian A Meinertzhagen

The funder (HHMI) provided technical support for study design, and data collection.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Liqun Luo, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: April 14, 2018
  2. Accepted: October 31, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 1, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 13, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Horne et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Jane Anne Horne
  2. Carlie Langille
  3. Sari McLin
  4. Meagan Wiederman
  5. Zhiyuan Lu
  6. C Shan Xu
  7. Stephen M Plaza
  8. Louis K Scheffer
  9. Harald F Hess
  10. Ian A Meinertzhagen
(2018)
A resource for the Drosophila antennal lobe provided by the connectome of glomerulus VA1v
eLife 7:e37550.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37550

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