1. Neuroscience
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Deficit of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) accelerates progressive hearing loss

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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e39159 doi: 10.7554/eLife.39159

Abstract

Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are activated during the cellular response to stress signals. Their activity is regulated by the MAPK-phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), a key component of the anti-inflammatory response. Stress kinases are well-described elements of the response to otic injury and the otoprotective potential of JNK inhibitors is being tested in clinical trials. In contrast, there are no studies exploring the role of DUSP1 in hearing and hearing loss. Here we show that Dusp1 expression is age-regulated in the mouse cochlea. Dusp1 gene knock-out caused premature progressive hearing loss, as confirmed by auditory evoked responses in Dusp1-/- mice. Hearing loss correlated with cell death in hair cells, degeneration of spiral neurons and increased macrophage infiltration. Dusp1-/- mouse cochleae showed imbalanced redox status and deregulated expression of cytokines. These data suggest that DUSP1 is essential for cochlear homeostasis in the response to stress during ageing.

Data availability

Source data files have been provided for ABR data in Figures 2 and Figure2-figure supplement 1, as well as for gene expression data in Figures 1, 3, 5, 6 and Figure1-figure supplement 1. Data has also been deposited on Dryad under the doi: 10.5061/dryad.51m8c58.

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Adelaida M Celaya

    Endocrine and Nervous System Pathophysiology, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    For correspondence
    acelaya@iib.uam.es
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0757-6163
  2. Isabel Sánchez-Pérez

    Experimental Models of Human Disease, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4829-201X
  3. Jose M Bermúdez-Muñoz

    Endocrine and Nervous System Pathophysiology, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6034-9285
  4. Lourdes Rodríguez-de la Rosa

    Endocrine and Nervous System Pathophysiology, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Laura Pintado-Berninches

    Experimental Models of Human Disease, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Rosario Perona

    Experimental Models of Human Disease, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Silvia Murillo-Cuesta

    Experimental Models of Human Disease, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8706-4327
  8. Isabel Varela-Nieto

    Experimental Models of Human Disease, Institute for Biomedical Research 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain
    For correspondence
    ivarela@iib.uam.es
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (SAF2017-86107-R)

  • Isabel Varela-Nieto

Federación Española de Enfermedades Raras (P17-01401)

  • Isabel Varela-Nieto

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Animal experimentation was conducted in accordance with Spanish (RD 53/2013) and European (Directive 2010/63/EU) legislations. All protocols used in this study were reviewed and approved by the Ethical Committee of Animal Experimentation at IIBm and Ethical Committee at CSIC in a facility inscribed in the official registration of breeding establishments, suppliers and users of experimental animals in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (registration number, ES280790000188). Mice procedures were done according with scientific, humane, and ethical principles. The studied mouse model did not show phenotype differences comparing male and female. Thus, to ensure that our research represents both genders, the studies describes in this work were performed using both sexes equitably. The number of biological and experimental replicates is detailed in the legend of each figure.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Christine Petit, Institut Pasteur, France

Publication history

  1. Received: June 12, 2018
  2. Accepted: April 1, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 2, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 15, 2019 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: June 7, 2019 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2019, Celaya et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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