Decision and navigation in mouse parietal cortex

  1. Michael Krumin
  2. Julie J Lee
  3. Kenneth D Harris
  4. Matteo Carandini  Is a corresponding author
  1. University College London, United Kingdom

Abstract

Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) has been implicated in navigation, in the control of movement, and in visually-guided decisions. To relate these views, we measured activity in PPC while mice performed a virtual navigation task driven by visual decisions. PPC neurons were selective for specific combinations of the animal's spatial position and heading angle. This selectivity closely predicted both the activity of individual PPC neurons, and the arrangement of their collective firing patterns in choice-selective sequences. These sequences reflected PPC encoding of the animal's navigation trajectory. Using decision as a predictor instead of heading yielded worse fits, and using it in addition to heading only slightly improved the fits. Alternative models based on visual or motor variables were inferior. We conclude that when mice use vision to choose their trajectories, a large fraction of parietal cortex activity can be predicted from simple attributes such as spatial position and heading.

Data availability

Behavioral and two-photon imaging data have been deposited in Dryad Digital Repository and are available at doi: 10.5061/dryad.ht3564h.

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Michael Krumin

    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7356-6994
  2. Julie J Lee

    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-7293-8538
  3. Kenneth D Harris

    Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5930-6456
  4. Matteo Carandini

    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    m.carandini@ucl.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4880-7682

Funding

Wellcome (109004)

  • Julie J Lee

H2020 European Research Council (CORTEX)

  • Matteo Carandini

Simons Foundation (325512)

  • Kenneth D Harris
  • Matteo Carandini

Wellcome (95668)

  • Kenneth D Harris
  • Matteo Carandini

Wellcome (95669)

  • Kenneth D Harris
  • Matteo Carandini

Wellcome (205093)

  • Kenneth D Harris
  • Matteo Carandini

Wellcome (108726)

  • Kenneth D Harris
  • Matteo Carandini

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Joshua I Gold, University of Pennsylvania, United States

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All experimental procedures were conducted according to the UK Animals Scientific Procedures Act (1986). Experiments were performed at University College London, under a Project Licence (70/8021) released by the Home Office following appropriate ethics review.

Version history

  1. Received: October 4, 2018
  2. Accepted: November 16, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 23, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 19, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Krumin et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Michael Krumin
  2. Julie J Lee
  3. Kenneth D Harris
  4. Matteo Carandini
(2018)
Decision and navigation in mouse parietal cortex
eLife 7:e42583.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.42583

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.42583

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