Muscle-derived Myoglianin regulates Drosophila imaginal disc growth

  1. Ambuj Upadhyay
  2. Aidan J Peterson
  3. Myung-Jun Kim
  4. Michael B O'Connor  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Minnesota, United States

Abstract

Organ growth and size are finely tuned by intrinsic and extrinsic signaling molecules. In Drosophila, the BMP family member Dpp is produced in a limited set of imaginal disc cells and functions as a classic morphogen to regulate pattern and growth by diffusing throughout imaginal discs. However, the role of TGFβ/Activin-like ligands in disc growth control remains ill-defined. Here we demonstrate that Myoglianin (Myo), an Activin family member, and a close homolog of mammalian Myostatin (Mstn), is a muscle-derived extrinsic factor that uses canonical dSmad2 mediated signaling to regulate wing size. We propose that Myo is a myokine that helps mediate an allometric relationship between muscles and their associated appendages.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ambuj Upadhyay

    Genetics, Cell Biology and Genetics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Aidan J Peterson

    Genetics, Cell Biology and Genetics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6801-3364
  3. Myung-Jun Kim

    Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Michael B O'Connor

    Genetics, Cell Biology, and Genetics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States
    For correspondence
    moconnor@umn.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3067-5506

Funding

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (R35GM118029)

  • Michael B O'Connor

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Hugo J Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine, United States

Version history

  1. Received: September 7, 2019
  2. Accepted: July 4, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 7, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 20, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Upadhyay et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Ambuj Upadhyay
  2. Aidan J Peterson
  3. Myung-Jun Kim
  4. Michael B O'Connor
(2020)
Muscle-derived Myoglianin regulates Drosophila imaginal disc growth
eLife 9:e51710.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.51710

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.51710

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