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Acute cerebellar knockdown of Sgce reproduces salient features of Myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11) in mice

  1. Samantha Washburn
  2. Rachel Freemont
  3. Maria Camila Moreno-Escobar
  4. Chantal Angueyra
  5. Kamran Khodakhah  Is a corresponding author
  1. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e52101 doi: 10.7554/eLife.52101

Abstract

Myoclonus dystonia (DYT11) is a movement disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in SGCE and characterized by involuntary jerking and dystonia that frequently improve after drinking alcohol. Existing transgenic mouse models of DYT11 exhibit only mild motor symptoms, possibly due to rodent-specific developmental compensation mechanisms, which have limited the study of neural mechanisms underlying DYT11. To circumvent potential compensation, we used short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to acutely knock down Sgce in the adult mouse and found that this approach produced dystonia and repetitive, myoclonic-like, jerking movements in mice that improved after administration of ethanol. Acute knockdown of Sgce in the cerebellum, but not the basal ganglia, produced motor symptoms, likely due to aberrant cerebellar activity. The acute knockdown model described here reproduces the salient features of DYT11 and provides a platform to study the mechanisms underlying symptoms of the disorder, and to explore potential therapeutic options.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Samantha Washburn

    Dominick P Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Rachel Freemont

    Dominick P Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Maria Camila Moreno-Escobar

    Dominick P Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Chantal Angueyra

    Dominick P Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Kamran Khodakhah

    Dominick P Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, United States
    For correspondence
    k.khodakhah@einstein.yu.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7905-5335

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS105470)

  • Kamran Khodakhah

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS089716)

  • Samantha Washburn

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols (#08-133) of the University of Arizona. The protocol was approved by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Permit Number: 20160805). All surgery was performed under isofulrane anesthesia, and every effort was made to minimize suffering.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Louis J Ptáček, University of California, San Francisco, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 22, 2019
  2. Accepted: December 20, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 23, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 14, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Washburn et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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