eLife News: labs

eLife News: labs

  1. Composing reproducible manuscripts using R Markdown

    April 05, 2017

    The technology is available for researchers to create a reproducible manuscript whereby calculations and graphs are generated computationally – thereby saving researcher time and avoiding human error. We are exploring ways to support life and biomedical scientists who wish to communicate their research in this way. In this post, Chris Hartgerink, a metascience researcher at Tilburg University, the Netherlands, describes how he composes a reproducible manuscript using R Markdown. If you would be interested in submitting your manuscript to eLife in R Markdown, or a similar format, please let us...

  2. Hack Cambridge Recurse entries: eXplore, Knowledge Direct, SciChat

    February 27, 2017

    We are delighted to showcase three projects entered for the eLife prize at Hack Cambridge Recurse : eXplore, Knowledge Direct and SciChat. The winner of the eLife prize was eXplore. These hackathon projects are still early stage, and each team welcomes contributions and feedback via the respective GitHub repositories. eXplore Team members: Charlotte Guzzo – PhD student in Biological Sciences, Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge Will Jones – PhD student in Mathematical Genomics and Medicine, University of Cambridge Patrick Short – PhD student in Mathematical Genomics and Medicine...

  3. Proteopedia for sharing macromolecule concepts online

    June 29, 2016

    Proteopedia is a tool for sharing knowledge about the structure and function of proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules on the web, developed by scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. Blog post by Jaime Prilusky and Joel L. Sussman, from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel Online publishing opens new opportunities for conveying scientific ideas in new ways. For example, Proteopedia makes it possible to publish ideas about the relationship between the structures of 3D biological macromolecules and their functions in novel, visual ways. Proteopedia is a web-based Wiki...

  4. The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) for science publishers

    May 16, 2016

    We are pleased to introduce the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF), a community-driven image framework with well-defined application program interfaces (APIs) for making the world’s image repositories interoperable and accessible. When it comes to communicating important discoveries, we appreciate that images can sometimes be as effective as simple text, if not more so. This blog post provides an overview of the IIIF standard, focusing on its potential for Scientific, Technical, and Medical (STM) publishers, with an invitation for these organisations to participate in a...

  5. Toward publishing reproducible computation with Binder

    May 13, 2016

    We are pleased to bring attention to a new and exciting open-source project called Binder, created by scientists at HHMI’s Janelia Research Campus. We are looking for new ways to exploit the flexibility of digital media, to present and make available all kinds of data and analysis, encouraging greater transparency in research and enabling the scientific community to build upon published results more effectively. Binder is a website and collection of open-source tools for building and executing reproducible computational environments. Binder makes it easy to include an interactive version of...

  6. Writing scholarly documents with Manuscripts

    January 11, 2016

    Manuscripts 1.0 is a tool that helps authors create a paper, complete with figures, tables, equations and a formatted bibliography, ready to be published. It has been designed by Manuscripts.app Ltd, headed by Matias Piipari. Blogpost by Matias Piipari, CEO and co-founder of Manuscriptsapp.com Manuscripts is a writing tool for scholarly documents: it helps with the entire process of writing up complex work, from outlining the paper to the editing, proofreading and publishing stages, all from within one beautiful experience. It is a tool I created based on my own writing experiences during...

  7. Authoring online with Lens Writer

    September 04, 2015

    Lens Writer is an online editor designed specifically to help with writing scientific manuscripts. In this blogpost, Ian Mulvany, eLife Head of Technology, explores why it's worth experimenting with online writing tools at all, and what we hope to get out of an experiment like this. You can read more about the features of Lens Writer here , and you can try out Lens Writer here . Most of the submissions eLife receives are created in Microsoft Word (96%), with the remainder in LaTex. Regardless of the current popularity of those tools, we see opportunities in developing web based alternatives...