eLife News

eLife News

  1. Webinar Report: Engaging with wider audiences

    May 03, 2017

    In the third #ECRWednesday webinar of 2017, speakers shared their experiences of communicating with different audiences. You can watch the full video here : Moderator: Stuart King, Associate Features Editor, eLife. Speakers: Anne Osterrieder, Lecturer in Biology and Science Communication, Oxford Brookes University; John Schell, MD/PhD candidate, University of Utah; Fionnuala Ratcliffe, Research Engagement Manager, Cancer Research UK. Are you interested in communicating your research to members of the public or scientists outside your field? Our panel offer the following pieces of advice to...

  2. Inside eLife: Working with Bio-protocol to publish peer-reviewed protocols

    April 26, 2017

    Recognizing the need for greater reproducibility in scientific research, Bio-protocol enables authors to publish their step-by-step methods A contribution to Inside eLife by Marielle Cavrois, Fanglian He and Vivian Siegel At Bio-protocol, Marielle Cavrois is Editor-in-Chief, Fanglian He is Executive Editor and Vivian Siegel is Senior Editorial Advisor Created in 2011 by a group of Stanford scientists, Bio-protocol is an online, peer-reviewed journal curating high-quality research protocols within the life sciences. Bio-protocol provides critical information that enables scientists to be able...

  3. Inside eLife: March roundup of eLife papers in the news

    April 25, 2017

    Each month, eLife papers receive media coverage in a number of high-profile, international news outlets. In the first of our monthly media coverage roundups, we highlight the top mentions that eLife papers generated in March. You can view the coverage, along with the related research articles, below: Evans et al.’s Research Article, ‘ Data-driven identification of potential Zika virus vectors ’, was featured in: New Scientist – Warmer weather could bring fresh Zika misery Gulf Times – Zika may be spread by 35 species of mosquitoes, researchers say The Seattle Times – Zika may be spread by 35...

  4. Inside eLife: Forking software used in eLife papers to GitHub

    April 24, 2017

    By Maria Guerreiro, Senior Editorial Assistant, eLife Since it was launched in 2008, the version-control repository and hosting service GitHub has not only been a vital tool in the daily life of programmers and developers, but it has also become increasingly important for researchers in the biomedical and life sciences. The influence of GitHub has grown significantly, with more than 56 million projects hosted (as of April 2017), and increasingly published papers include citations to GitHub (Jeffrey Perkel, " Democratic databases: science on GitHub ", Nature, 2016). GitHub and other hosting...

  5. Inside eLife: Three early-career researchers awarded first travel grants for 2017

    April 21, 2017

    In the first round of applications for 2017, Douglas Brumley, Ryo Matsuda and Rachel Lowe have been selected by eLife Senior Editors to receive travel grants, based on the quality of the eLife papers they put forward for consideration. The subjects covered in this round were Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology, Computational and Systems Biology, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, Epidemiology and Global Health, and Human Biology and Medicine. We received over 35 applications for this round and have five more rounds and 17 grants available to award before the final deadline. The...

  6. Press package: Viral fossils reveal how our ancestors may have eliminated an ancient infection

    April 11, 2017

    Scientists have uncovered how our ancestors may have wiped out an ancient retrovirus around 11 million years ago. Retroviruses, which include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are abundant in nature. Unlike other viruses, which do not usually leave a physical trace of their existence, retroviruses include a step in their life cycle where their genetic material is integrated into the genome of their host. This integration has created a genetic fossil record of extinct retroviruses that is preserved in the genomes of modern organisms. Writing in the journal eLife, researchers from the...

  7. Inside eLife: A message from our Early-Career Advisory Group

    April 11, 2017

    ‘It’s time to change what we value in science’ At eLife, we’re working to create a more positive publishing experience that will, among other things, support early-career researchers and help them navigate their increasing hurdles and receive the recognition they deserve. Made up of graduate students, postdocs, and junior group leaders from across the globe, the eLife Early-Career Advisory Group is a driving force for this change, committed to guiding the direction of the journal and helping us achieve our goal to re-shape science publishing. In our latest video, their message was loud and...

  8. Press package: Legionella bacteria’s escape route revealed

    April 11, 2017

    The precise mechanism used by Legionella bacteria to escape the body’s defences has been unpicked in intricate detail and is described for the first time in the journal eLife. The study reveals a potential new therapeutic approach to tackle infection by Legionella pneumophila , which is a common cause of community and hospital-acquired pneumonia and causes death in almost a third of cases. One of the ways the body rids itself of infection is to gobble up bacteria or viruses within its cells – a process called autophagy. But particularly dangerous bacteria, such as Legionella , have evolved...

  9. Setting your cites on open

    April 07, 2017

    The Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC) was launched on April 6th, 2017. Over the course of about six months, the initiative has made a large fraction of the citation data that link all scholarship freely available. Mark Patterson (eLife) and Catriona MacCallum (PLOS) were two of the people involved and below they describe how this initiative started and where it might lead. Blog post by Mark Patterson, eLife, and Catriona MacCallum, PLOS It is enormously satisfying when a good idea captures the imagination and takes off and that’s precisely what happened with the Initiative for Open...

  10. Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC) launches with early success

    April 06, 2017

    There is fresh momentum in the scholarly publishing world to open up data on the citations that link research publications. Six organizations today announced the establishment of the Initiative for Open Citations ( I4OC ): OpenCitations, the Wikimedia Foundation, PLOS, eLife, DataCite, and the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University. Until recently, the vast majority of citation data were not openly available, even though all major publishers freely share their metadata through the foundational infrastructure provided by Crossref . Before I4OC started, only about 1% of the...

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