Immunology and Inflammation

Immunology and Inflammation

eLife publishes research spanning allergy, immunity and immunoregulation, inflammation and T-cell receptor signalling. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
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Latest articles

    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    IgE-mediated mast cell activation promotes inflammation and cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis

    Qian Wang et al.
    Osteoarthritis pathogenesis is driven by IgE-mediated mast cell activation.
    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    HIF-1α regulates IL-1β and IL-17 in sarcoidosis

    Jaya Talreja et al.
    Sarcoidosis, a granulomatous disease characterized by macrophage and T-cell activation, is found to be associated with increased HIF-1α transcriptional activity, and modulation of HIF-1α regulates inflammatory immune responses.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    IL-21/type I interferon interplay regulates neutrophil-dependent innate immune responses to Staphylococcus aureus

    Rosanne Spolski et al.
    Neutrophil-dependent innate immune responses to the human pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, are modulated by an interplay between interleukin-21 and type 1 interferons.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Antigen receptor control of methionine metabolism in T cells

    Linda V Sinclair et al.
    Antigen receptor control of methionine transport is critical to co-ordinate protein synthesis and the production of methyl donors for nucleotide and protein methylations which are required for T cell differentiation.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    T Cell Activation: The importance of methionine metabolism

    Ramon I Klein Geltink, Erika L Pearce
    T helper cells import methionine to synthesize new proteins and to provide the methyl groups needed for the methylation of RNA and DNA that drives T cell proliferation and differentiation.
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    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Optogenetic control shows that kinetic proofreading regulates the activity of the T cell receptor

    O Sascha Yousefi et al.
    Controlling the duration of ligand binding to the T cell receptor by light shows that T cells discriminate stimulatory from non-stimulatory ligands by measuring the dynamics of ligand binding.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Light-based tuning of ligand half-life supports kinetic proofreading model of T cell signaling

    Doug K Tischer, Orion David Weiner
    Direct control of ligand binding half-life with light shows that lifetime strongly affects T cell signaling.

Senior editors

  1. Karla Kirkegaard
    Stanford University School of Medicine, United States
  2. Satyajit Rath
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
  3. Tadatsugu Taniguchi
    Tadatsugu Taniguchi
    Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Japan
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