Immunology and Inflammation

Immunology and Inflammation

eLife publishes research spanning allergy, immunity and immunoregulation, inflammation and T-cell receptor signalling. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Genetic timestamping of plasma cells in vivo reveals tissue-specific homeostatic population turnover

    An Qi Xu et al.
    A new system to genetically label and manipulate plasma cells in vivo in their microenvironment resolves current technical limitations and reveals tissue-specific homeostatic population turnover.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Medicine

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells mediate protective host responses in sepsis

    Shubhanshi Trivedi et al.
    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, highly activated and dysfunctional in sepsis patients, contribute to tissue-specific cytokine responses that are protective against mortality during experimental sepsis.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    LRRC8A is essential for hypotonicity-, but not for DAMP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Jack P Green et al.
    Depletion of LRRC8A provides genetic evidence for the importance of Cl- channels in NLRP3 activation.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    MicroRNAs of the miR-17~9 family maintain adipose tissue macrophage homeostasis by sustaining IL-10 expression

    Xiang Zhang et al.
    miR-17~92 family of miRNAs control the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue macrophages, the absence of which leads to disturbed adipose homeostasis.
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein regulates non-selective autophagy and mitochondrial homeostasis in human myeloid cells

    Elizabeth Rivers et al.
    WASp is an immunometabolic regulator of human myeloid cells and regulates autophagy and mitochondrial homeostasis.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Cytotoxic T cells swarm by homotypic chemokine signalling

    Jorge Luis Galeano Niño et al.
    Killer T cells swarm around tumour targets by accelerating the recruitment of distant T cells, which upon arrival and target engagement augment the chemotactic signal in a positive feedback loop.

Senior editors

  1. Miles P Davenport
    University of New South Wales, Australia
  2. Wendy S Garrett
    Wendy S Garrett
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, United States
  3. Tadatsugu Taniguchi
    Tadatsugu Taniguchi
    Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Japan
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