Immunology and Inflammation

Immunology and Inflammation

eLife publishes research spanning allergy, immunity and immunoregulation, inflammation and T-cell receptor signalling. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Human Biology and Medicine
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Chronic muscle weakness and mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of sustained atrophy in a preclinical sepsis model

    Allison M Owen et al.
    Sepsis-induced long-term muscle weakness was reproduced using a refined murine model, which was accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of sustained atrophy, suggesting the promise of mitochondria-targeted post-sepsis therapies.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Neuroscience

    Neutrophils promote CXCR3-dependent itch in the development of atopic dermatitis

    Carolyn M Walsh et al.
    Neutrophils are essential for itch in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis, and promote the transition from acute to chronic itch via induction of CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Neuroscience

    Intestinal infection regulates behavior and learning via neuroendocrine signaling

    Jogender Singh, Alejandro Aballay
    Feedback from the intestine during infection can modulate the behavior, learning, and microbial perception of the host.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Neuroscience

    Autoimmunity: Bringing on the itch

    Daniel A Waizman et al.
    Neutrophils are the first immune cells that enter the skin and cause itch in atopic dermatitis.
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    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Soluble PD-L1 generated by endogenous retroelement exaptation is a receptor antagonist

    Kevin W Ng et al.
    An ancient integration of an endogenous retroelement in the gene encoding PD-L1 is exapted to generate a soluble form that antagonises the suppressive function of the membrane-bound form.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation

    Drosophila macrophages switch to aerobic glycolysis to mount effective antibacterial defense

    Gabriela Krejčová et al.
    Activated Drosophila macrophages undergo transient metabolic remodeling towards Hypoxia inducible factor 1 α-driven aerobic glycolysis, a program that induces systemic metabolic changes and is crucial for resistance to infection.

Senior editors

  1. Wendy S Garrett
    Wendy S Garrett
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, United States
  2. Karla Kirkegaard
    Stanford University School of Medicine, United States
  3. Satyajit Rath
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
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