Transport of soluble proteins through the Golgi occurs by diffusion via continuities across cisternae

  1. Galina V Beznoussenko
  2. Seetharaman Parashuraman
  3. Riccardo Rizzo
  4. Roman Polishchuk
  5. Oliviano Martella
  6. Daniele Di Giandomenico
  7. Aurora Fusella
  8. Alexander Spaar
  9. Michele Sallese
  10. Maria Grazia Capestrano
  11. Margit Pavelka
  12. Matthijn R Vos
  13. Yuri GM Rikers
  14. Volkhard Helms
  15. Alexandre A Mironov
  16. Alberto Luini  Is a corresponding author
  1. Fondazione IFOM, Italy
  2. Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-IBP), Italy
  3. Telethon Institute for Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM), Italy
  4. Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Italy
  5. Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria
  6. FEI Company, Netherlands
  7. Saarland University, Germany

Abstract

The mechanism of transport through the Golgi complex is not completely understood, insofar as no single transport mechanism appears to account for all of the observations. Here, we compare the transport of soluble secretory proteins (albumin and α1-antitrypsin) with that of supramolecular cargoes (e.g., procollagen) that are proposed to traverse the Golgi by compartment progression-maturation. We show that these soluble proteins traverse the Golgi much faster than procollagen while moving through the same stack. Moreover, we present kinetic and morphological observations that indicate that albumin transport occurs by diffusion via intercisternal continuities. These data provide evidence that this transport mechanism that applies to a major class of secretory proteins and indicate the co-existence of multiple intra-Golgi trafficking modes.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Galina V Beznoussenko

    Fondazione IFOM, Milan, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Seetharaman Parashuraman

    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-IBP), Naples, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Riccardo Rizzo

    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-IBP), Naples, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Roman Polishchuk

    Telethon Institute for Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM), Naples, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Oliviano Martella

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Daniele Di Giandomenico

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Aurora Fusella

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Alexander Spaar

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Michele Sallese

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Maria Grazia Capestrano

    Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Margit Pavelka

    Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Matthijn R Vos

    FEI Company, Eindhoven, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Yuri GM Rikers

    FEI Company, Eindhoven, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Volkhard Helms

    Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  15. Alexandre A Mironov

    Fondazione IFOM, Milan, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  16. Alberto Luini

    Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche (CNR-IBP), Naples, Italy
    For correspondence
    luini@tigem.it
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Suzanne R Pfeffer, Stanford University, United States

Version history

  1. Received: December 4, 2013
  2. Accepted: May 25, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 27, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 25, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Beznoussenko et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Galina V Beznoussenko
  2. Seetharaman Parashuraman
  3. Riccardo Rizzo
  4. Roman Polishchuk
  5. Oliviano Martella
  6. Daniele Di Giandomenico
  7. Aurora Fusella
  8. Alexander Spaar
  9. Michele Sallese
  10. Maria Grazia Capestrano
  11. Margit Pavelka
  12. Matthijn R Vos
  13. Yuri GM Rikers
  14. Volkhard Helms
  15. Alexandre A Mironov
  16. Alberto Luini
(2014)
Transport of soluble proteins through the Golgi occurs by diffusion via continuities across cisternae
eLife 3:e02009.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02009

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https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02009

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