1. Cell Biology
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The metal transporter ZIP13 supplies iron into the secretory pathway in Drosophila melanogaster

  1. Guiran Xiao
  2. Zhihui Wan
  3. Qiangwang Fan
  4. Xiaona Tang
  5. Bing Zhou  Is a corresponding author
  1. Tsinghua University, China
Research Article
  • Cited 48
  • Views 2,508
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Cite this article as: eLife 2014;3:e03191 doi: 10.7554/eLife.03191

Abstract

The intracellular iron transfer process is not well understood and the identity of the iron transporter responsible for iron delivery to the secretory compartments remains elusive. Here we show Drosophila ZIP13 (Slc39a13), a presumed zinc importer, fulfills the iron effluxing role. Interfering with dZIP13 expression causes iron-rescuable iron absorption defect, simultaneous iron increase in the cytosol and decrease in the secretory compartments, failure of ferritin iron loading, and abnormal collagen secretion. dZIP13 expression in E. coli confers upon the host iron-dependent growth and iron resistance. Importantly, time-coursed transport assays using an iron isotope indicated a potent iron exporting activity of dZIP13. The identification of dZIP13 as an iron transporter suggests that the spondylocheiro dysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, in which hZIP13 is defective, is likely due to a failure of iron delivery to the secretory compartments. Our results also broaden our knowledge of the scope of defects from iron dyshomeostasis.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Guiran Xiao

    Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Zhihui Wan

    Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Qiangwang Fan

    Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Xiaona Tang

    Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Bing Zhou

    Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
    For correspondence
    zhoubing@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Randy Schekman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: April 25, 2014
  2. Accepted: July 7, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 8, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 15, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Xiao et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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