1. Plant Biology
Download icon

Irreversible fate commitment in the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage requires a FAMA and RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED module

  1. Juliana L Matos
  2. On Sun Lau
  3. Charles Hachez
  4. Alfredo Cruz-Ramírez
  5. Ben Scheres
  6. Dominique C Bergmann  Is a corresponding author
  1. Stanford University, United States
  2. Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
  3. CINVESTAV, Mexico
  4. Wageningen University, Netherlands
Research Article
  • Cited 36
  • Views 3,347
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2014;3:e03271 doi: 10.7554/eLife.03271

Abstract

The presumed totipotency of plant cells leads to questions about how specific stem cell lineages and terminal fates could be established. In the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage, a transient self-renewing phase creates precursors that differentiate into one of two epidermal cell types, guard cells or pavement cells. We found that irreversible differentiation of guard cells involves RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) recruitment to regulatory regions of master regulators of stomatal initiation, facilitated through interaction with a terminal stomatal lineage transcription factor, FAMA. Disrupting physical interactions between FAMA and RBR preferentially reveals the role of RBR in enforcing fate commitment over its role in cell-cycle control in this developmental context. Analysis of the phenotypes linked to the modulation of FAMA and RBR sheds new light on the way iterative divisions and terminal differentiation are coordinately regulated in a plant stem-cell lineage.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Juliana L Matos

    Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. On Sun Lau

    Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Charles Hachez

    Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Alfredo Cruz-Ramírez

    CINVESTAV, Irapuato, Mexico
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Ben Scheres

    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Dominique C Bergmann

    Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    For correspondence
    bergmann@stanford.edu
    Competing interests
    Dominique C Bergmann, Reviewing editor, eLife.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Richard Amasino, University of Wisconsin, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: May 4, 2014
  2. Accepted: October 9, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 10, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 10, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Matos et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 3,347
    Page views
  • 482
    Downloads
  • 36
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, Scopus, PubMed Central.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Plant Biology
    Mark Zander et al.
    Research Article
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Plant Biology
    Yibo Dong et al.
    Research Article