Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations

  1. Kevin M Esvelt  Is a corresponding author
  2. Andrea L Smidler
  3. Flaminia Catteruccia
  4. George M Church
  1. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard Medical School, United States
  2. Harvard School of Public Health, United States

Abstract

Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Kevin M Esvelt

    Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    For correspondence
    kevin.esvelt@wyss.harvard.edu
    Competing interests
    Kevin M Esvelt, Filed for a patent concerning RNA-guided gene drives.
  2. Andrea L Smidler

    Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    Andrea L Smidler, Filed for a patent concerning RNA-guided gene drives.
  3. Flaminia Catteruccia

    Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. George M Church

    Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    George M Church, Filed for a patent concerning RNA-guided gene drives.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Diethard Tautz, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: May 18, 2014
  2. Accepted: July 9, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 17, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: July 17, 2014 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: August 1, 2014 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2014, Esvelt et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Kevin M Esvelt
  2. Andrea L Smidler
  3. Flaminia Catteruccia
  4. George M Church
(2014)
Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations
eLife 3:e03401.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03401

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