1. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine
  2. Immunology and Inflammation
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The basic leucine zipper transcription factor NFIL3 directs the development of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor

  1. Xiaofei Yu
  2. Yuhao Wang
  3. Mi Deng
  4. Yun Li
  5. Kelly A Ruhn
  6. Cheng Cheng Zhang
  7. Lora V Hooper  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2014;3:e04406 doi: 10.7554/eLife.04406

Abstract

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are recently identified lymphocytes that limit infection and promote tissue repair at mucosal surfaces. However, the pathways underlying ILC development remain unclear. Here we show that the transcription factor NFIL3 directs the development of a committed bone marrow precursor that differentiates into all known ILC lineages. NFIL3 was required in the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP), and was essential for the differentiation of αLP, a bone marrow cell population that gives rise to all known ILC lineages. Clonal differentiation studies revealed that CXCR6+ cells within the αLP population differentiate into all ILC lineages but not T- and B-cells. We further show that NFIL3 governs ILC development by directly regulating expression of the transcription factor TOX. These findings establish that NFIL3 directs the differentiation of a committed ILC precursor that gives rise to all ILC lineages and provide insight into the defining role of NFIL3 in ILC development.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Xiaofei Yu

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Yuhao Wang

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Mi Deng

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Yun Li

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Kelly A Ruhn

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Cheng Cheng Zhang

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Lora V Hooper

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    For correspondence
    lora.hooper@utsouthwestern.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animal experiments were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Research Advisory Committee at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and the approved animal protocol number is 1004-06-04-1. The institutional guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals were followed.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Satyajit Rath, National Institute of Immunology, India

Publication history

  1. Received: August 19, 2014
  2. Accepted: October 10, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 13, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 5, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Yu et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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