1. Cell Biology
  2. Developmental Biology
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Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes

  1. David C Zebrowski
  2. Silvia Vergarajauregui
  3. Chi-Chung Wu
  4. Tanja Piatkowski
  5. Robert Becker
  6. Marina Leone
  7. Sofia Hirth
  8. Filomena Ricciardi
  9. Nathalie Falk
  10. Andreas Giessl
  11. Steffen Just
  12. Thomas Braun
  13. Gilbert Weidinger
  14. Felix B Engel  Is a corresponding author
  1. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  2. University of Ulm, Germany
  3. Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Germany
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e05563 doi: 10.7554/eLife.05563

Abstract

Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. David C Zebrowski

    Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Silvia Vergarajauregui

    Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Chi-Chung Wu

    Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Tanja Piatkowski

    Department of Cardiac Development and Remodeling, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Robert Becker

    Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Marina Leone

    Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Sofia Hirth

    Department of Medicine II, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Filomena Ricciardi

    Department of Developmental Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Nathalie Falk

    Department of Biology, Animal Physiology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Andreas Giessl

    Department of Biology, Animal Physiology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Steffen Just

    Department of Medicine II, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Thomas Braun

    Department of Cardiac Development and Remodeling, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Gilbert Weidinger

    Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Felix B Engel

    Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
    For correspondence
    felix.engel@uk-erlangen.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: The investigation conforms with the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals published by the Directive 2010/63/EU of the European Parliament and according to the regulations issued by the Committee for Animal Rights Protection of the State of Hessen (Regierungspraesidium Darmstadt) as well as Baden-Württemberg (Regierungspraesidium Tübingen). Extraction of organs and preparation of primary cell cultures were approved by the local Animal Ethics Committee in accordance to governmental and international guidelines on animal experimentation (protocol TS - 5/13 Nephropatho; Zebrafish protocol number o.183).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Yukiko M Yamashita, University of Michigan, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: November 11, 2014
  2. Accepted: July 30, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 6, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 19, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Zebrowski et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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