1. Cell Biology
  2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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A FYVE zinc finger domain protein specifically links mRNA transport to endosome trafficking

  1. Thomas Pohlmann
  2. Sebastian Baumann
  3. Carl Haag
  4. Mario Albrecht
  5. Michael Feldbrügge  Is a corresponding author
  1. Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
  2. Centre for Genomic Regulation, Spain
  3. Graz University of Technology, Austria
Research Article
  • Cited 32
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e06041 doi: 10.7554/eLife.06041

Abstract

An emerging theme in cellular logistics is the close connection between mRNA and membrane trafficking. A prominent example is the microtubule-dependent transport of mRNAs and associated ribosomes on endosomes. This coordinated process is crucial for correct septin filamentation and efficient growth of polarised cells such as fungal hyphae. Despite detailed knowledge on the key RNA-binding protein and the molecular motors involved, it is unclear how mRNAs are connected to membranes during transport. Here, we identify a novel factor containing a FYVE zinc finger domain for interaction with endosomal lipids and a new PAM2-like domain required for interaction with the MLLE domain of the key RNA-binding protein. Consistently, loss of this FYVE domain protein leads to specific defects in mRNA, ribosome and septin transport without affecting general functions of endosomes or their movement. Hence, this is the first endosomal component specific for mRNP trafficking uncovering a new mechanism to couple mRNPs to endosomes.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Thomas Pohlmann

    Institute for Microbiology, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Sebastian Baumann

    Cell and Developmental Biology, Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Carl Haag

    Institute for Microbiology, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Mario Albrecht

    Institute for Knowledge Discovery, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Michael Feldbrügge

    Institute for Microbiology, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
    For correspondence
    feldbrue@hhu.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Anna Akhmanova, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Publication history

  1. Received: December 12, 2014
  2. Accepted: May 15, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 18, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 15, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Pohlmann et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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