Microbiology and Infectious Disease

Microbiology and Infectious Disease

eLife publishes research covering virology, bacteriology and mycology. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
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Latest articles

    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Integrase-RNA interactions underscore the critical role of integrase in HIV-1 virion morphogenesis

    Jennifer L Elliott et al.
    HIV-1 integrase-RNA interactions account for the key role of integrase in particle maturation.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Viral Maturation: How to package the RNA of HIV-1

    Alex Kleinpeter, Eric O Freed
    Interactions between viral RNA and the integrase enzyme are required for HIV-1 particles to become infectious, a process that can be disrupted through multiple mechanisms.
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    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Doxycycline has distinct apicoplast-specific mechanisms of antimalarial activity

    Megan Okada et al.
    Doxycycline used at a slightly higher concentration kills Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites with faster, first-cycle activity through a novel organelle-specific mechanism.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Interplay between bacterial deubiquitinase and ubiquitin E3 ligase regulates ubiquitin dynamics on Legionella phagosomes

    Shuxin Liu et al.
    A novel bacterial deubiquitinase with multiple chain types specificity regulates the association of ubiquitinated proteins on the phagosome of Legionella pneumophila.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    The alternative sigma factor σX mediates competence shut-off at the cell pole in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Calum HG Johnston et al.
    Tracking fluorescent fusion proteins in competent pneumococcal cells reveals a polar hub for competence regulation, with the alternative sigma factor σX relocalizing DprA to this hub to mediate competence shut-off.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Transcription termination and antitermination of bacterial CRISPR arrays

    Anne M Stringer et al.
    Many bacteria use the Nus factor antitermination complex to prevent premature Rho-dependent transcription termination of their CRISPR arrays.

Senior editors

  1. Miles P Davenport
    University of New South Wales, Australia
  2. Wendy S Garrett
    Wendy S Garrett
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, United States
  3. Päivi Ojala
    University of Helsinki, Finland
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