Microbiology and Infectious Disease

Microbiology and Infectious Disease

eLife publishes research covering virology, bacteriology and mycology. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    An interbacterial DNA deaminase toxin directly mutagenizes surviving target populations

    Marcos H de Moraes et al.
    Interbacterial interactions can promote mutagenesis, and possibly adaptation, when intoxicated cells survive exposure to type VI secretion-delivered DNA deaminase toxins.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial Warfare: Toxins, mutations and adaptations

    Maarten De Jong, Neal M Alto
    The toxins that some bacteria secrete to kill off rival species can also generate mutations that help toxin-resistant populations adapt to new environments.
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    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    The Spike D614G mutation increases SARS-CoV-2 infection of multiple human cell types

    Zharko Daniloski et al.
    A pervasive mutation in the Spike protein of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 results in virions that are up to eightfold more infectious.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Virus infection of the CNS disrupts the immune-neural-synaptic axis via induction of pleiotropic gene regulation of host responses

    Olga A Maximova et al.
    Virus infection of the central nervous system disrupts the homeostasis of the immune-neural-synaptic axis via induction of pleiotropic genes with an unintended off-target negative impact on the neurotransmission.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    A pentameric protein ring with novel architecture is required for herpesviral packaging

    Allison L Didychuk et al.
    The first structures of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF68 and Epstein–Barr virus BFLF1, conserved and essential proteins required in herpesviruses, reveal new insights into viral genome packaging.

Senior editors

  1. Miles P Davenport
    University of New South Wales, Australia
  2. Bavesh Kana
    University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
  3. Gisela Storz
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, United States
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