1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
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The chromatin remodelers RSC and ISW1 display functional and chromatin-based promoter antagonism

  1. Timothy J Parnell
  2. Alisha Schlichter
  3. Boris G Wilson
  4. Bradley R Cairns  Is a corresponding author
  1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e06073 doi: 10.7554/eLife.06073

Abstract

ISWI-family chromatin remodelers organize nucleosome arrays, while SWI/SNF-family remodelers (RSC) disorganize and eject nucleosomes, implying an antagonism that is largely unexplored in vivo. Here, we describe two independent genetic screens for rsc suppressors that yielded mutations in the promoter-focused ISW1a complex, or mutations in the 'basic patch' of histone H4 (an epitope that regulates ISWI activity), strongly supporting RSC-ISW1a antagonism in vivo. RSC and ISW1a largely co-localize, and genomic nucleosome studies using rsc isw1 mutant combinations revealed opposing functions: promoters classified with a nucleosome-deficient region (NDR) gain nucleosome occupancy in rsc mutants, but this gain is attenuated in rsc isw1 double mutants. Furthermore, promoters lacking NDRs have the highest occupancy of both remodelers, consistent with regulation by nucleosome occupancy, and decreased transcription in rsc mutants. Taken together, we provide the first genetic and genomic evidence for RSC-ISW1a antagonism, and reveal different mechanisms at two different promoter architectures.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Timothy J Parnell

    Department of Oncological Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Alisha Schlichter

    Department of Oncological Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Boris G Wilson

    Department of Oncological Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Bradley R Cairns

    Department of Oncological Sciences, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, United States
    For correspondence
    brad.cairns@hci.utah.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. James T Kadonaga, University of California, San Diego, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: December 13, 2014
  2. Accepted: March 28, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 30, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 7, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Parnell et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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