The hormonal peptide Elabela guides angioblasts to the midline during vasculogenesis

  1. Christian S M Helker
  2. Annika Schuermann
  3. Cathrin Pollmann
  4. Serene C Chng
  5. Friedemann Kiefer
  6. Bruno Reversade
  7. Wiebke Herzog  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Muenster, Germany
  2. Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Germany
  3. A*STAR, Singapore

Abstract

A key step in the de novo formation of the embryonic vasculature is the migration of endothelial precursors, the angioblasts, to the position of the future vessels. To form the first axial vessels, angioblasts migrate towards the midline and coalesce underneath the notochord. Vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) has been proposed to serve as a chemoattractant for the angioblasts and to regulate this medial migration. Here we challenge this model and instead demonstrate that angioblasts rely on their intrinsic expression of Apelin receptors (Aplr, APJ) for their migration to the midline. We further show that during this angioblast migration Apelin receptor signaling is mainly triggered by the recently discovered ligand Elabela (Ela). As neither of the ligands Ela or Apelin (Apln) nor their receptors have previously been implicated in regulating angioblast migration, we hereby provide a novel mechanism for regulating vasculogenesis, with direct relevance to physiological and pathological angiogenesis.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Christian S M Helker

    n/a, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Annika Schuermann

    n/a, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Cathrin Pollmann

    n/a, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Muenster, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Serene C Chng

    Institute of Medical Biology, Human Genetics and Embryology Laboratory, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Friedemann Kiefer

    n/a, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Muenster, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Bruno Reversade

    Institute of Medical Biology, Human Genetics and Embryology Laboratory, A*STAR, Sinagapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Wiebke Herzog

    n/a, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    For correspondence
    wiebke.herzog@mpi-muenster.mpg.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Tanya T Whitfield, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animal experiments were performed in strict accordance with the relevant laws and institutional guidelines the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Muenster and the Institute of Medical Biology, Singapore. All protocols were approved by animal ethics committees of the state of North Rhine-Westfalia (Germany,# 39.32.7.1) and Singapore, respectively, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering.

Version history

  1. Received: January 27, 2015
  2. Accepted: May 22, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 27, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 16, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Helker et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Christian S M Helker
  2. Annika Schuermann
  3. Cathrin Pollmann
  4. Serene C Chng
  5. Friedemann Kiefer
  6. Bruno Reversade
  7. Wiebke Herzog
(2015)
The hormonal peptide Elabela guides angioblasts to the midline during vasculogenesis
eLife 4:e06726.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06726

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06726

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