1. Immunology and Inflammation
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Antigen presentation kinetics control T cell/dendritic cell interactions and Tfh generation in vivo

  1. Robert A Benson
  2. Megan KL MacLeod
  3. Benjamin G Hale
  4. Agapitos Patakas
  5. Paul Garside
  6. James M Brewer  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  2. University of Zurich, Switzerland
Research Article
  • Cited 34
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e06994 doi: 10.7554/eLife.06994

Abstract

The production of high affinity, class switched antibodies produced by B cells hinges on the effective differentiation of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Here we define conditions specifically enhancing Tfh differentiation and providing protection in a model of influenza infection. Tfh responses were associated with prolonged antigen presentation by Dendritic cells (DCs), which maintained T cell/DC interactions into stage 3 (>72 hours) of activation. Blocking stage 3 interactions ablated Tfh generation, demonstrating a causal link between T cell-DC behaviour and functional outcomes. The current data therefore explain how duration of antigen presentation affects the dynamics of T cell-DC interactions and consequently determine Tfh cell differentiation in the developing immune response.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Robert A Benson

    Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Megan KL MacLeod

    Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Benjamin G Hale

    Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Agapitos Patakas

    Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Paul Garside

    Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. James M Brewer

    Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    Robert.Benson@glasgow.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animals were specified pathogen free and maintained under standard animal house conditions at the University of Glasgow in accordance with local and UK Home Office Regulations.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Shimon Sakaguchi, Osaka University, Japan

Publication history

  1. Received: February 13, 2015
  2. Accepted: August 8, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 10, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 3, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Benson et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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Further reading

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