1. Cell Biology
  2. Immunology and Inflammation
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Immune surveillance of the lung by migrating tissue-monocytes

  1. Mathieu P Rodero
  2. Lucie Poupel
  3. Pierre-Louis Loyher
  4. Pauline Hamon
  5. Fabrice Licata
  6. Charlotte Pessel
  7. David A Hume
  8. Christophe Combadière
  9. Alexandre Boissonnas  Is a corresponding author
  1. University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, France
  2. The Roslin Institute, United Kingdom
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e07847 doi: 10.7554/eLife.07847

Abstract

Monocytes are phagocytic effector cells in blood and precursors of resident and inflammatory tissue macrophages. The aim of the current study was to analyse and compare their contribution to innate immune surveillance of the lung in the steady state with macrophage and dendritic cells. ECFP and EGFP transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r and Cx3cr1 distinguish monocytes from resident mononuclear phagocytes. We used these transgenes to study the migratory properties of monocytes and macrophages by functional imaging on explanted lungs. Migratory monocytes were found to be either patrolling within large vessels of the lung or locating at the interface between lung capillaries and alveoli. This spatial organisation gives to monocytes the property to capture fluorescent particles derived from both vascular and airway routes. We conclude that monocytes participate in steady-state surveillance of the lung, in a way that is complementary to resident macrophages and dendritic cells, without differentiating into macrophages.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Mathieu P Rodero

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Lucie Poupel

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Pierre-Louis Loyher

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Pauline Hamon

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Fabrice Licata

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Charlotte Pessel

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. David A Hume

    Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The Roslin Institute, Midlothian, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Christophe Combadière

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Alexandre Boissonnas

    Centre d'Immunologie et des Maladies Infectieuses, University Pierre et Maria Curie, Sorbonne Universities, Paris, France
    For correspondence
    alexandre.boissonnas@upmc.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All experiment protocols were approved by the French animal experimentation and ethics committee and validated by "Service Protection et Santé Animales, Environnement" with the number A-75-2065. Sample sizes were chosen to assure reproducibility of the experiments and according to the 3R of animal ethic regulation.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Ronald N Germain, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: April 1, 2015
  2. Accepted: July 10, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 13, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 3, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Rodero et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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