1. Immunology and Inflammation
  2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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An extrafollicular pathway for the generation of effector CD8+ T cells driven by the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-12

  1. Suhagi Shah
  2. Gijsbert M Grotenbreg
  3. Amariliz Rivera
  4. George S Yap  Is a corresponding author
  1. Rutgers University, United States
  2. 121 Bio LLC, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e09017 doi: 10.7554/eLife.09017

Abstract

The proinflammatory cytokine IL-12 drives the generation of terminally differentiated KLRG1+ effector CD8+ T cells. Using a Toxoplasma vaccination model, we delineate the sequence of events that naïve CD8+ T cells undergo to become terminal effectors and the differentiation steps controlled by IL-12. We demonstrate that direct IL-12 signaling on CD8+ T cells is essential for the induction of KLRG1 and IFN-γ, but the subsequent downregulation of CXCR3 is controlled by IL-12 indirectly through the actions of IFN-γ and IFN-γ-inducible chemokines. Differentiation of nascent effectors occurs in an extrafollicular splenic compartment and is driven by late IL-12 production by DCs distinct from the classical CD8α+ DC. Unexpectedly, we also found extensive proliferation of both KLRG1 and KLRG1+ CD8+ T cells in the marginal zone and red pulp, which ceases prior to the final KLRG1Hi CXCR3Lo stage. Our findings highlight the notion of an extrafollicular pathway for effector T cell generation.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Suhagi Shah

    Center for Immunity and Inflammation, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Gijsbert M Grotenbreg

    121 Bio LLC, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Amariliz Rivera

    Center for Immunity and Inflammation, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. George S Yap

    Center for Immunity and Inflammation, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, United States
    For correspondence
    yapgs@njms.rutgers.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) of the Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences, protocol number 13110. The protocol was approved by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments of Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Urszula Krzych, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: May 26, 2015
  2. Accepted: August 4, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 5, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 26, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Shah et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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