1. Cell Biology
  2. Developmental Biology
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A feedback mechanism converts individual cell features into a supracellular ECM structure in Drosophila trachea

  1. Arzu Öztürk-Çolak
  2. Bernard Moussian
  3. Sofia J Araujo  Is a corresponding author
  4. Jordi Casanova
  1. Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Spain
  2. University of Tuebingen, Germany
Research Article
  • Cited 21
  • Views 2,171
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e09373 doi: 10.7554/eLife.09373

Abstract

The extracellular matrix (ECM), a structure contributed to and commonly shared by many cells in an organism, plays an active role during morphogenesis. Here we used the Drosophila tracheal system to study the complex relationship between the ECM and epithelial cells during development. We show that there is an active feedback mechanism between the apical ECM (aECM) and the apical F-actin in tracheal cells. Furthermore, we reveal that cell-cell junctions are key players in this aECM patterning and organisation and that individual cells contribute autonomously to their aECM. Strikingly, changes in the aECM influence the levels of phosphorylated Src42A (pSrc) at cell junctions. Therefore, we propose that Src42A phosphorylation levels provide a link for the extracellular matrix environment to ensure proper cytoskeletal organisation.

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Author details

  1. Arzu Öztürk-Çolak

    Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Bernard Moussian

    Animal Genetics, Interfaculty Institute for Cell Biology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Sofia J Araujo

    Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    For correspondence
    sarbmc@ibmb.csic.es
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Jordi Casanova

    Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Utpal Banerjee, University of California, Los Angeles, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: June 12, 2015
  2. Accepted: January 25, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: February 2, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 12, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Öztürk-Çolak et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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