1. Cell Biology
  2. Computational and Systems Biology
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Active machine learning-driven experimentation to determine compound effects on protein patterns

  1. Armaghan W Naik
  2. Joshua D Kangas
  3. Devin P Sullivan
  4. Robert F Murphy Is a corresponding author
  1. Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Research Article
Cited
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Cite as: eLife 2016;5:e10047 doi: 10.7554/eLife.10047

Abstract

High throughput screening determines the effects of many conditions on a given biological target. Currently, to estimate the effects of those conditions on other targets requires either strong modeling assumptions (e.g. similarities among targets) or separate screens. Ideally, data-driven experimentation could be used to learn accurate models for many conditions and targets without doing all possible experiments. We have previously described an active machine learning algorithm that can iteratively choose small sets of experiments to learn models of multiple effects. We now show that, with no prior knowledge and with liquid handling robotics and automated microscopy under its control, this learner accurately learned the effects of 48 chemical compounds on the subcellular localization of 48 proteins while performing only 29% of all possible experiments. The results represent the first practical demonstration of the utility of active learning-driven biological experimentation in which the set of possible phenotypes is unknown in advance.

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Author details

  1. Armaghan W Naik

    1. Computational Biology Department, Center for Bioimage Informatics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Joshua D Kangas

    1. Computational Biology Department, Center for Bioimage Informatics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Devin P Sullivan

    1. Computational Biology Department, Center for Bioimage Informatics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Robert F Murphy

    1. Computational Biology Department, Center for Bioimage Informatics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, United States
    For correspondence
    1. murphy@cmu.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Uwe Ohler, Reviewing Editor, Duke, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: July 13, 2015
  2. Accepted: January 28, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: February 3, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: March 7, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Naik et al

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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