Computational and Systems Biology

Computational and Systems Biology

eLife publishes research involving the use of methods, models and software. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    A curative combination cancer therapy achieves high fractional cell killing through low cross-resistance and drug additivity

    Adam C Palmer et al.
    Drugs in a curative chemotherapy regimen are independently effective and resisted by different mechanisms, so cancer cells have little chance of surviving all drugs, and this benefit occurs without synergistic interactions.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Initiation of chromosome replication controls both division and replication cycles in E. coli through a double-adder mechanism

    Guillaume Witz et al.
    Single-cell measurements combined with a new statistical framework for discriminating between models of cell cycle regulation show that chromosome initiation controls the E. coli cell cycle via two adder mechanisms.
    1. Cancer Biology
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    Computational and cellular studies reveal structural destabilization and degradation of MLH1 variants in Lynch syndrome

    Amanda B Abildgaard et al.
    Biophysical modeling, performed in silico, can predict the abundance, metabolic stability, and function of MLH1 inside living cells.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Adaptation to mutational inactivation of an essential gene converges to an accessible suboptimal fitness peak

    João V Rodrigues, Eugene I Shakhnovich
    When an essential metabolic gene in E. coli is mutationally inactivated, subsequent evolution rarely reverts the mutation to wild type but rather follows unexpected paths that rewire metabolic fluxes.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial survival in microscopic surface wetness

    Maor Grinberg et al.
    A new intricate reciprocity between microbiology and physics results in collective protection from desiccation through differential formation of stable microdroplets around bacterial aggregates on surfaces drying under moderate humidity.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Bacterial Survival: Life on a leaf

    Robin Tecon
    Microscopic water films allow bacteria to survive the seemingly dry surface of plant leaves.
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Senior editors

  1. Naama Barkai
    Naama Barkai
    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
  2. Ronald L Calabrese
    Emory University, United States
  3. Patricia Wittkopp
    University of Michigan, United States
  4. See more editors